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So which country is best?

Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Google search Monterey+California+rats:
Naval Postgraduate School Monterey at the University of Southern California "THE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL AROUSAL ON LEARNING IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS".
The omission of emotional arousal in the design of these VEs may be reducing the effectiveness of the training being conducted. Research using rats, discussed in detail in the next chapter, has shown that emotional arousal (particularly fear) regulates long-term memory storage. As such, this research investigates the plausibility that emotional arousal (in this case stress) in humans could serve as one possible method for transferring material taught in a virtual environment to long-term memory storage.



Uncontrolled vocabularies
"I try my best to make *all* my posts nice, even when I feel upset" -- Philippe Maquet
John Smith
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Joined: Oct 08, 2001
Posts: 2937
Map: Google search Monterey+California+rats:
Your search query was a bit imprecise. I was struggling with myself whether I should respect Al's privacy or respect my relation with you, Map, but then I realized that Al brought it upon himself.
So, here it is. "Rats", followed by the exlamation sign is the slang expression indicating disappointment or disbelief. Monterey, California is home to Defense Language Institute. Virtually every CIA and US Army counter-intelligence operative specializing in Russian region has graduated from one of their programs, -- typically one year or more of intense study of Russian language, literature, and culture. You can judge the quality of the program by Al's involved knowledge of Russian language and culture, -- if you are not paying attention, you may as well think that he is Russian.
After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the cold war, the demand for the Defense Language Institute graduates subsided drammatically. Many former spies found their new jobs as interpreters in non-military organizations. However, if you are typical CIA officer who has at least a Master's Degree, translating from Russian to English in some doctor's office is like flipping burgers when you hold a Ph.D in Food and Agriculture. A much better avenue is to capitalize on your knowledge and experience. For example, spend a few years in the former evil empire teaching English to Russians, learn a few things from the students, and write a book about it.
Now, I want to make it very clear, Al: working for the government agencies is just another kind of job, as long as you feel comfortable with it. It's irreleveant how other people feel about it. I mean, you should never be ashamed of being a Christian, even if you are surrounded by Muslims, and vise versa. With that in mind, I welcome you again to our diverse ranch population, Al!
Erwin Bredford
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Joined: Feb 11, 2003
Posts: 167
IT HAS TO BE NIGERIA COME ON .
TAKE A BOW!!!


--One learns a lot during a lesson but seeing is not enough,you must do;knowing is not enough ,you must apply--<br />SCJP 1.4,SCBCD,SCEA part 1,OCM JEE Enterprise Architect.
Anonymous
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Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:
Now, I want to make it very clear, Al: working for the government agencies is just another kind of job, as long as you feel comfortable with it. It's irreleveant how other people feel about it.!

The question, of course, is which agency I'm working for. Perhaps my flawed Russian is but a ruse to disguise my real loyalties?
With that in mind, I welcome you again to our diverse ranch population, Al
Eugene, now that we've consumed our first metaphorical glass of vodka, let us now dispense with the personal formalities....Please call me by my secret code name, Rats.

Alan Labout
Valedictorian, Monterrey Class of '88
Mapraputa Is
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Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Eugene: "Rats", followed by the exlamation sign is the slang expression indicating disappointment or disbelief.
Hey, I know. I even used it myself (in past, do not remember using it for long time, I guess I am no more disappointed ) Just thought Al's reply is ambiguous enough to provide a good potential for a joke.
As for the rest... You think Al is black?
For non-Slavic Union members, there is an anecdote about Monterey Defense Language Institute graduates.
An American spy, it seems, landed in the middle of a Russian countryside, buried his parachute, and after changing into traditional peasant clothes hiked to a village where he came upon a house and an old woman sitting on its porch. The woman looked at him suspiciously, but the man approached her anyway, addressing her in flawless, accentless Russian:
Babushka, he said, Give me some water!
The old woman, listening to his request for a drink, looked at him severely and said:
I won't give you anything, you American spy!
Well, turned out the guy was black.
And when it turned out like this, all he could say was "Rats!"
P.S. I worked on my English this weekend, so I am pretty sure I did not make any mistake in the above anecdote...
John Smith
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Joined: Oct 08, 2001
Posts: 2937
Map: As for the rest... You think Al is black?
Well, "ruse to disguise my real loyalties" does sound like ebonics, and taking the trends for equal opportunity into consideration, it's not an unlikely proposition that Al was one of the first black guys to be sent to Russia as a spy.
frank davis
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Joined: Feb 12, 2001
Posts: 1479
Originally posted by chinedu efoagui:
IT HAS TO BE NIGERIA COME ON .
TAKE A BOW!!!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3157570.stm
But then Americans became more happy :
http://www.dw-world.de/english/0,3367,4789_W_1017338,00.html
And the happiest of the happy live with me in Florida,
http://209.157.64.200/focus/f-news/973469/posts
Anonymous
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Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
P.S. I worked on my English this weekend, so I am pretty sure I did not make any mistake in the above anecdote...

!!
Map: I counted at least 78 grammatical mistakes in the above anecdote--78 of which concerned indefinite articles. This just goes to show you that you really have to be careful about who you learn English from: alas, there are a lot of imposters out there...!
Hey Eugene: Does "alas" also remind you of Ebonics?
This calls to mind an English translation that I recently read where the translator tried to render Russian vernacular speech of the early 20th century and it came out sounding more like the speech of Southern blacks: "Now listen here, Sanya. I'm tellin' ya it just ain't right what they did to Avdotia Solomonovna...!"

p.s. I am not black.

Respectfully,
Alan
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
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Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
And when it turned out like this, all he could say was "Rats!"
I think a good English translation of this should have something stronger than "Rats!" "Shee-eet!" perhaps. (Yes, that should be two syllables.)
Map: I counted at least 78 grammatical mistakes in the above anecdote--78 of which concerned indefinite articles.
Sadly, Map is still inarticulate much of the time...
[running away now...]


"I'm not back." - Bill Harding, Twister
John Smith
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Joined: Oct 08, 2001
Posts: 2937
This calls to mind an English translation that I recently read where the translator tried to render Russian vernacular speech of the early 20th century and it came out sounding more like the speech of Southern blacks: "Now listen here, Sanya. I'm tellin' ya it just ain't right what they did to Avdotia Solomonovna...!"
Very cute.
p.s. I am not black.
Hey, relax, bro. The last thing we need to know is the color of your skin. It's your sense of humor that is being tested here.
Joe Pluta
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Joined: Jun 23, 2003
Posts: 1376
And then of course there's the (possibly apocryphal) anecdote about a computer translating program that translated a phrase from English to Russian and back...
"The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak."
came back as
"The vodka is good but the meat is rotten."
Not sure about whether it really happened, but it certainly made me chuckle the first time I heard it.
Joe
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Jim: I counted at least 78 grammatical mistakes in the above anecdote -- 78 of which concerned indefinite articles.
Rats! You all confused me now -- who is supposed to make fun of whom? Ok, I copied that anecdote from "Twelve Stories of Russia" book verbatim.
Joe: And then of course there's the (possibly apocryphal) anecdote about a computer translating program that translated a phrase from English to Russian and back...
This story *does* seem apocryphal...
Urban Legends:
Debunked: Russian/Chinese mechanical translator translates "out of sight, out of mind" into "blind and insane". Also "Spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak" as "the drink is good but the meat is rotten."
http://www.urbanlegends.com/faq2k/compute_index.html
And here is more detailed account:
John Hutchins. "The whisky was invisible", or Persistent myths of MT (PDF)
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Jim: I think a good English translation of this should have something stronger than "Rats!" "Shee-eet!" perhaps.
Actually, I think he said: "Oops!"
Alan: Respectfully,
Alan

Now these are fighting words! "Respectful speech" in MD -- how do you like it?
(Just kidding).
 
 
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