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Colors

fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
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Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11308
    
  16

Pat Farrell wrote:OK, take a piece of dark paper and @bear's box of crayons.

Combine them to make white.

When you fail, the box of crayons is not a basis set.

I'd just use the white crayon near the top right.


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
chris webster
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Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1701
    
  14

Jesper de Jong wrote:One of the subjects they talked about was how different people, or people in different cultures, seem to perceive colors differently. One thing that's curious for example is that many ancient cultures, for example the ancient Greeks, didn't have a word for "blue". You'd say that the blue sky should be obvious to them, but it seems that for some reason they weren't very aware of the color blue.

The Celtic languages apparently used the same word for blue and green historically e.g. the Welsh word "glas" means blue these days, but occurs in older place names e.g. "Glasgow" where it meant green. These languages subsequently acquired a word for green e.g. Welsh "gwyrdd" (related to Latin "viridis"), presumably when they decided it was a useful distinction to make. But given the recent weather here in Wales, I'm starting to doubt the usefulness of any colour terms other than "grey" right now...


No more Blub for me, thank you, Vicar.
Frank Silbermann
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Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1387
chris webster wrote:
Jesper de Jong wrote:One of the subjects they talked about was how different people, or people in different cultures, seem to perceive colors differently. One thing that's curious for example is that many ancient cultures, for example the ancient Greeks, didn't have a word for "blue". You'd say that the blue sky should be obvious to them, but it seems that for some reason they weren't very aware of the color blue.

The Celtic languages apparently used the same word for blue and green historically e.g. the Welsh word "glas" means blue these days, but occurs in older place names e.g. "Glasgow" where it meant green. These languages subsequently acquired a word for green e.g. Welsh "gwyrdd" (related to Latin "viridis"), presumably when they decided it was a useful distinction to make. But given the recent weather here in Wales, I'm starting to doubt the usefulness of any colour terms other than "grey" right now...
It may be that the Celts have a higher level of testosterone than other people -- when you consider that gay interior decorators seem to have a great many more words for color distinctions than has the average man. As for the country/province you mentioned, well, the ocean can appear either blue or green depending on how the light reflects off it -- so it's not surprising that whales consider it the same color.
chris webster
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Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1701
    
  14

Frank Silbermann wrote:It may be that the Celts have a higher level of testosterone than other people -- when you consider that gay interior decorators seem to have a great many more words for color distinctions than has the average man.

Hm, not sure about the stereotyping there. It might be just that, like the famous "Eskimos words for snow" example, they need more words to describe what they're dealing with every day.

Anyway, Russians have two words for "blue", so good luck with that theory!

I remember reading somewhere that some women see more shades of red than men, because they have two copies of the genes that determine their colour vision, one on each X chromosome. These genes have different variants that code for slight differences in the relevant retinal pigment that responds to red light, so some women have both variants of the red-sensitive pigment. Men only have one X chromosome, so they don't get this extra red variant and instead are far more likely to suffer from colour blindness.

Aside:
Apparently, Eskimo languages don't necessarily have many more words for snow than English, it's just that they commonly need to use more specialised descriptions of snow that would usually be used in English only by people who deal with a lot of snow - skiers, polar explorers etc. Also, Eskimo languages are agglutinating, which means that what we would regard as a phrase or sentence is regarded as a single word in an Eskimo language. So maybe they would have one "word" to express the English phrase "really wet grey snow full of dog dirt", for example, but both languages can express the same concept easily enough.

Anyway, that's enough time-wasting from me: Colour me gone.
Paul Clapham
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Joined: Oct 14, 2005
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    8

chris webster wrote:The Celtic languages apparently used the same word for blue and green historically e.g. the Welsh word "glas" means blue these days, but occurs in older place names e.g. "Glasgow" where it meant green.


And I'm told that in Scots Gaelic, "glas" means (or meant) something between grey and green. And when I was hiking the West Highland Way back in May, I was thinking what a useful word that was because everything I could see was a shade of glas.

If you really want to be amazed by how other people see blue and green, check out the Wikipedia article about Distinguishing blue from green in language.
dennis deems
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Joined: Mar 12, 2011
Posts: 808
Jesper de Jong wrote:There's an interesting show about colors from the RadioLab podcast - very interesting and entertaining to listen to.

One of the subjects they talked about was how different people, or people in different cultures, seem to perceive colors differently. One thing that's curious for example is that many ancient cultures, for example the ancient Greeks, didn't have a word for "blue". You'd say that the blue sky should be obvious to them, but it seems that for some reason they weren't very aware of the color blue.


I'm deeply skeptical of claims like this, because we just don't know. We don't have anything remotely approaching all the facts. We have maybe 5 percent of the facts, if that. We don't know what idioms may have thrived in their language but simply failed to be preserved in the extant writings. Consider that Sophocles wrote 123 plays but only 7 have survived. We can't make sweeping statements about a dead language and, bizarrely, conclude things about the physiology of those who spoke it, based on the little that remains of it. Consider too how much use of color terminology is likely to be non-literal even in a work that is not poetry. We commonly say of one who exhibits cowardice that he is yellow, of one who feels envy that he is green. Anger makes us see red, while unhappiness makes us feel blue. 1500 years from now, folks will surely think our eyes must have perceived the world quite strangely.
Greg Charles
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 2850
    
  11

chris webster wrote:
The Celtic languages apparently used the same word for blue and green historically ...


Vietnamese still has the same word (xanh) for blue and green, but it can distinguish them with extra words, like we do with shades. Sky "xanh", leaf "xanh", and sea "xanh" are the most common.


There's an interesting Straight Dope column here that speculates that humans' ability to perceive colors developed in parallel to their creation of words for them.
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 38765
    
  23
Greg Charles wrote:. . . that humans' ability to perceive colors developed in parallel to their creation of words for them.
I have seen that sort of theory before, based on what Gladstone said about the absence of blue words in Greek. I had thought it rather far‑fetched, and having read that Straight Dope link, I see it was incorrect.
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4655
    
    5

I assume words for colors explode when the users need them. The above example of skiers. When I raced motorcycles we had a ton of phrases/words for crashes. Normal folks would just say "Pat crashed his bike." but we made distinctions between highside, lowside, death wobbles, being spit over the handlebars, etc.
Martin Vajsar
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 22, 2010
Posts: 3610
    
  60

Pat Farrell wrote:I assume words for colors explode when the users need them. ...

It's interesting that, given the amount of computer bugs I encounter, I haven't developed a sophisticated vocabulary for different kinds of bugs. I probably need to speak about my bugs with other people much more, then the need for the words will eventually arise!
Rizvan Asgarov
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Joined: Jan 07, 2009
Posts: 451

Hi All,
Baseet Ahmed wrote: 1. RED as Blood
2. GREEN as Tree
3. Blue as Sky

These are also colors of our flag (Azerbaijan):

The blue band refers to the nation's Turkic heritage, the red stands for progress, and the green represents Islam


"Half of the science is to ask question"
Paul Clapham
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Joined: Oct 14, 2005
Posts: 18564
    
    8

Red for progress? That's a cultural association that I hadn't heard before. Do you think it's an Azerbaijani thing or was it maybe left over from the old Soviet Union days?
Rizvan Asgarov
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Joined: Jan 07, 2009
Posts: 451

Hi Paul and others,
Paul Clapham wrote: Red for progress? That's a cultural association that I hadn't heard before. Do you think it's an Azerbaijani thing or was it maybe left over from the old Soviet Union days?

The first unofficial Soviet Azerbaijani flag was used when Russians conquered Baku on April 28, 1920.



After gaining independence, the three-color national flag of Azerbaijan was adopted by the government of the Democratic Republic of Azerbaijan on November 9, 1918. Azerbaijan was the first modern democratic state in the Muslim World. Among the important accomplishments of the Parliament was the extension of suffrage to women, making Azerbaijan the first Muslim nation to grant women equal political rights with men. And now national flag (next to the map) of Azerbaijan is as the following (before 1920 and present):


So the red color is for the progress to establish a modern state and the development of democracy...

Thanks
Baseet Ahmed
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2006
Posts: 224

After RGB colors, there is White color which takes place.

I am not sure whether white could be primary color or not but I like it !!!


--------
Regard
Ahmed
 
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subject: Colors