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eclipse vs. netbeans contention seems to be settled

Axel Janssen
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Joined: Jan 08, 2001
Posts: 2164
Microsoft.net has good effects. It seems to be good for cooperation:
http://techupdate.zdnet.com/techupdate/stories/main/0,14179,5105441,00.html
jason adam
Chicken Farmer ()
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Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
Yeah, I heard Sun did a 180 degree turn-around in regards to Open-Source, but it still seems they are a ways away from working hand-in-hand with their biggest ally.
Now if Java would only figure a way to do cross-language development like .NET is.
Thanks for the article!
[ April 03, 2002: Message edited by: jason adam ]
Kyle Brown
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Joined: Aug 10, 2001
Posts: 3879
Originally posted by jason adam:
Yeah, I heard Sun did a 180 degree turn-around in regards to Open-Source, but it still seems they are a ways away from working hand-in-hand with their biggest ally.
Now if Java would only figure a way to do cross-language development like .NET is.
Thanks for the article!
[ April 03, 2002: Message edited by: jason adam ]

Ummmmm.... Then it wouldn't be Java would it?
Kyle


Kyle Brown, Author of Persistence in the Enterprise and Enterprise Java Programming with IBM Websphere, 2nd Edition
See my homepage at http://www.kyle-brown.com/ for other WebSphere information.
jason adam
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Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
No, it wouldn't, but it would be nice. That way I wouldn't be forced into going the .NET route because the company sees cross-language development as a good thing, which I have to admit it is.
Now if Java actually became .NET-aware, things would be ok. Don't see that happening. Have to do what I can to make a living.
Gerry Giese
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Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 247
Jason,
How is cross-language development a good thing? Define cross-language development while you're at it.
I do think it's important to know more than one language, and it's important for runtimes written for more than one language to be able to cummunicate with each other so each can accomplish tasks they're best at. But I'm not sure that "cross-language development" .Net-style is going to cure very many software development problems.
Java already interacts with other languages quite well. JNI and Jython are good examples, and Java can work with just about anything via sockets, CORBA, or SOAP.
So is your company is heading for .Net and you're just saying you'll miss Java? Cookies crumble, I guess. I would miss Java, too, but from what I little I know of C#, it is basicly a rip-off of Java, so you won't miss it too much.


CJP (Certifiable Java Programmer), AMSE (Anti-Microsoft Software Engineer)
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jason adam
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Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
Very good points.
Yes, I would totally miss Java if I had to go the .NET route. It's not something I want to do, it is something that I might have to do if the company I work for decides that is the way they are going. Already some of the sectors are redoing all of their web services in .NET, and once they start, I'm sure it will domino. Basically, the developers that are here aren't keen on actually learning a language, they more like to have graphical tools that help them build things easily. We're already a MS heavy company, so their opinion is why stop now.
Yes, Java can talk with other languages, but not as easily as .NET is making their stuff out to be. You write your code in VB, Managed C++, C#, whatever, you can easily use classes that were set up in another .NET-aware language (inheritance, all that). Mind you, I've not really delved into either, so this is purely based on academic learning instead of truly practical uses. Yes, that is not the best of situations to base an opinion on, but I'm not in the best of situations.
And yes, C# is a huge rip off of Java. In fact, several things that the whole .NET framework does is extremely suspect to what Java already provides. Coincidence? I think not.
Don't get me wrong, Java is my passion, has been since I started over a year ago and it hasn't waned since. But right now I do sys admin junk on NT, and hate it. If I want to move into software development, and keep with the same company (since the benefits are great, pay isn't too bad, and they are paying for all my schooling), I'll probably end up having to do the devil's work.
I did read in another post that there is actually a .NET compiler for Java. That at least gives me hope.
Gerry Giese
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Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 247
JavaWorld's Best and Worst of JavaOne 2002
Best embrace-and-extend play
In Monday's technical keynote, Sun talked a lot about Java's support for the full gamut of Web services. Sun used VisualStudio .Net to build
a Web service client to a Java-based Web service. Now you can feel free to aggressively refute anybody who thinks that .Net will somehow
cut Java out of the market. The more that (open) standards and implementations are available, the less of a stranglehold Microsoft can
exert upon the world.
Gerry Giese
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Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 247
Some Users See Java on Back End, .Net on Front End
jason adam
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Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
Great articles Gerry! Funny thing is, I work at Lockheed, also (see last comment in second article), and parts of the company are already going to .NET. But hey, we have enough miscommunication as it is, why not throw in some more. That lack of company cohesiveness might mean I'll have a Java job
Gerry Giese
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Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 247
I work at Lockheed, too, indirectly. Sandia Labs, actually. We're all over the map, and cohesiveness in our IT efforts is not our strong point because of the labs culture that's been around forever. I haven't heard of any efforts to use .Net, but I'm sure somebody is looking at it. I have heard a few people toss around the 'Web Services' buzzword, but nothing serious. Mostly people in the IT (not scientific) area seem to be interested in J2EE and ColdFusion, but there 's "other" stuff floating around as well.
jason adam
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Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
ColdFusion is the big thing in the WebServ groups. Never done it myself, and seems to be what is keeping me away from moving over in that area (besides the fact that they just laid off a large percentage of people). I believe it is either Sunnyvale or San Diego, I can't remember which coast, has already begun the move to .NET. Since each area tends to be its own little empire, it is not suprise that some haven't even started thinking about it, while others are full steam ahead. Being here in Denver, we probably won't start moving for awhile, Space Systems isn't getting the contracts that defense and aeronautics are.
The whole corporate initiative is to move all web services to J2EE or .NET (notice it is not AND, but OR). Now how they plan on implementing all this is a different story. Most likely, each area will do it's own thing.
Either way, I'm stuck where I am right now due to hiring freezes, but was told if I really want to move over, knowing both would be good (duh!), with more a focus on .NET
 
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