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Question about IDE's

Thomas Harrington
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 29, 2003
Posts: 22
Hi,
I have a question for the employed professionals. What IDE is the buisness standard for Java? I mostly use NetBeans while at the university, but while at an interview, I was asked to write some sample code, and the IDE they had was by Borland. Since I have never used it before, I am sure I looked clumsy while I clicked around searching for various features. Now I do not have the funds to go and buy every IDE out there, so I thought I would purchase the one most used by large buisnesses. Can you please tell me what IDE your company uses?
Thank you for your input,
Tom
Bear Bibeault
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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William Barnes
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Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

There is no standard in my company. Most of the people in my group use vi or emacs (which are smart text editors, not IDEs).


Please ignore post, I have no idea what I am talking about.
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
William, I'm very interested in how that works out. Some in our organization believe there must be exactly one blessed IDE that everyone must use. Can you describe any processes you have around this - source control, building distributions? Any problems? How do you avoid using proprietary features of one tool and getting locked in?


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William Barnes
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Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

I work for a large company. So what one group is doing doesn't have anything to with what another group is doing. Which is why different groups are able to use different solutions.
My group uses vi or emacs to write the code, cvs for source control and ant to build. (Ant by the way rules!) Our product runs in WebSphere but we don't use their IDE.
[ March 30, 2003: Message edited by: William Barnes ]
Marilyn de Queiroz
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 22, 2000
Posts: 9047
    
  10
In my group, some used JBuilder, some use SlickEdit, some use IntelliJ, some use vi. We ran into the problem where some people said, "Well, it works in my IDE. I don't know why it won't work in yours."


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Thomas Harrington
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 29, 2003
Posts: 22
A friend of mine who works for GE told me they use J++ from Microsoft. He also told me that Visual Studio is what GE installed on every programmers computer. I was wondering is Microsoft is the standard. I guess from what I am reading in the posts is: 1) there is no standard and, 2) some companies allow different groups to use different IDE's. What I do not understand about one company having multiple IDE's is: doesn't that increase cost as normally the price goes down as licenses are pucrhased in quantity? Plus you would think it would make managing large projects more difficult.
John Smith
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Joined: Oct 08, 2001
Posts: 2937
JBuilder for an IDE, Ant for builds, Weblogic for app server, OptimizeIt for profiler, PVCS for source control.
Eugene.
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
It's worth noting that if you want/need to familiarize yourself with JBuilder, you can download JBuilder 8 Personal for free, with no time limit. It doesn't have as many features as other editions (the ones that cost money) but it's still useful in and of itself - especially for learning how it works. Even for the features that aren't available in the free version, you can at least see where the controls are located (grayed out). You can see the differences between the various JBuilder editions here.
Oh, and don't overlook Eclipse (also free). Not as easy to understand as JBuilder, but far more powerful and flexible (at least compared to JBuilder Personal; probably also compared to JBuilder Professional. (But I only have version 5 of that; haven't bothered paying for an upgrade since then.)


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Michael Morris
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Joined: Jan 30, 2002
Posts: 3451

In my group, some used JBuilder, some use SlickEdit, some use IntelliJ, some use vi. We ran into the problem where some people said, "Well, it works in my IDE. I don't know why it won't work in yours."

That's an easy problem to solve. Everyone use vi.
Michael Morris


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Ravee Bhat
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Joined: Nov 26, 1999
Posts: 72

Nothing standard in my organization. Personally I use eclipse. Very good, one of the best things about eclipse is the plug-ins.
Has anyone used pramati studio? People here are contemplating on purchasing it.
[ March 30, 2003: Message edited by: Ravee Bhat ]
Barry Gaunt
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Joined: Aug 03, 2002
Posts: 7729
Our standard is JBuilder, but that's because the suits are VisBaz mentality. I use Eclipse or plain vanilla.


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William Barnes
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Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986


What I do not understand about one company having multiple IDE's is: doesn't that increase cost as normally the price goes down as licenses are pucrhased in quantity? Plus you would think it would make managing large projects more difficult.

In my company each group has their own budget, so they spend it how they want. And different groups are not working on the same projects, so there isn't any issue there.
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
Fascinating answers, everyone. I think we'll be a Websphere Studio standard shop. It's nice to get an enterprise license, and to be able to carry your skills from one project to another. We also have big issues about using open source without contracted support, and Websphere gets us a supported version of Struts.
My own project uses a vendor framework that is locked into VAJ visual composition. That's on a short road with a hard dead end, so I'm not sure what might happen next.
Of course it will be hard to use Websphere Studio without getting locked into more proprietary features. A text editor standard has its merits!
[ March 31, 2003: Message edited by: Stan James ]
Chris Stehno
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Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 180
I have been using NetBeans for a few years now and the company I work for adopted it as our standard about six months ago. We are using all that cash we saved to buy better server hardware.


- Chris Stehno, SCPJ
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
This thread really belongs in the IDE's forum, so I'm moving it there.
Leslie Chaim
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Joined: May 22, 2002
Posts: 336
Originally posted by Michael Morris:

That's an easy problem to solve. Everyone use vi.
Michael Morris


Better yet: www.vim.org


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Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Thomas Harrington:
What IDE is the buisness standard for Java?

The is only one correct answer... the one I use[i]. :-)
Seriously, as you've seen people's taste varies. It's also not uncommon for people to use different IDEs within one company. One word of caution, however, some of the modern IDEs (i.e. JBuilder, VisualAge, as opposed to Emacs--I'm trying to avoid the typical debate about whether or not this is a true IDE), tend to add their own little code hacks. They won't break in other IDEs, but other IDEs won;t follow the standard.
As an example, JBuilder creates a method called [i]jbInit()
and puts the GUI code in their. This allows the display to correctly display the component. IIRC, if your co-worker creates a GUI using a different tool, and doesn't create this arbitrary method, JBuilder won't display it.
--Mark
Thomas Harrington
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 29, 2003
Posts: 22
What???
Maybe this is the dumbest question ever, but I do not get it. Why add code? What does the user get out of it?
BTW, I think the vandalism of the moose is hallarious! Someone here has a very good sense of humor.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by Thomas Harrington:
Maybe this is the dumbest question ever, but I do not get it. Why add code? What does the user get out of it?
Faster development time.


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John Lee
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Joined: Aug 05, 2001
Posts: 2545
Thanks for the information!
 
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