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Eclipse CVS help

rick collette
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 208
Hi, guys:
I am using Eclipse IDE on Windows 2000, and I loaded a CVS repository from a remote machine. I am trying to add/remove individual files from this shared repository to update my files, it seems that all CVS documents support CVS on unix-ops. I am wondering how can I do the above actions?
And I will be very greatful if you guys can point me to the common guide line for CVS on Windows platform.
Thanks.
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
If you have Eclispe, why do you need to know about low-level manuipulation of CVS? Eclipse has a buit in "team" CVS client which I use all the time.
To delete a file from the project in the repository, just delete it from your working copy, click team >> synchronize with repository, and it does it.
Or am I missing the point of what you are trying to do?


Read about me at frankcarver.me ~ Raspberry Alpha Omega ~ Frank's Punchbarrel Blog
Hung Tang
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 14, 2002
Posts: 148
Rick,
In Eclipse, it has its own CVS client which you can use to do your updates, commits, and other basic CVS commands that you are accustomed to in unix/linux.
Just add a CVS repository perspective, right click on the window and add a repository location. You can then checkout projects, and add, update, synchronize files through the Java perspective.
It takes a little of getting used to the various perspectives offered in Eclipse, and how the CVS synchronization features work, but it's not that difficult really.
Good luck
rick collette
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 208
Hi, Hung Tang:
Thank you very much for your input. I am a real newbie of Eclipse, I just started using that. I cannot imagine it is this easy like what you pointed out.
Originally posted by Hung Tang:
Rick,
In Eclipse, it has its own CVS client which you can use to do your updates, commits, and other basic CVS commands that you are accustomed to in unix/linux.
Just add a CVS repository perspective, right click on the window and add a repository location. You can then checkout projects, and add, update, synchronize files through the Java perspective.
It takes a little of getting used to the various perspectives offered in Eclipse, and how the CVS synchronization features work, but it's not that difficult really.
Good luck
rick collette
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 208
Thanks, Frank:
team >> synchronize with repository, and it does it.

I cannot find team, should I create this menu for it already exists? Sorry, I am a real newbie.
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
If you open a project in the left-hand "package explorer" pane, then right-click on the project name you should see "team" near the bottom of the menu that appears.
If you only see it "greyed out", it probably means you have not associated your project with a CVS repository as suggested above.
The best thing is to look up CVS in the built-in Eclipse help system. That's how I got started.
Ed Burnette
Author
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Joined: Jun 10, 2003
Posts: 142
Originally posted by rick collette:

I cannot find team, should I create this menu for it already exists? Sorry, I am a real newbie.

You need to check the entire project out from CVS, using the built-in client, before you can do Team operations on it. You do this from the CVS perspective as a previous poster indicated.
Also note you should be using the full "SDK" version of Eclipse and not the smaller "Runtime" version.


Ed Burnette, Author of Hello Android
Blog: ZDNet's Dev Connection - Twitter: @eburnette
Ilja Preuss
author
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by Ed Burnette:
Also note you should be using the full "SDK" version of Eclipse and not the smaller "Runtime" version.

Huh, why? I am using the Runtime version + JDT, and it works quite fine...


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
Ed Burnette
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 10, 2003
Posts: 142
Originally posted by Ilja Preuss:

Huh, why? I am using the Runtime version + JDT, and it works quite fine...

Runtime + JDT would include no source code for the platform, no programming doc, and no plugin development system. These are all included in the SDK. So although it wouldn't affect whether or not CVS and generic Java programming work, it's what I recommend people get so that stuff will be available in case it's needed, for example if you ever decide to write a SWT program or a simple plugin.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: Eclipse CVS help