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Any one using Eclipse for real development?

barry boatfield
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 06, 2003
Posts: 7
No, thats not meant sarcastically.
It would be good to hear some tales of succesful use other than as the foundation for tools such as websphere.
I like what I've seen of Eclipse which is admittedly limited, though along with others, finding the switch from Swing to SWT a little confusing. Not that it seems that Swing is really to be missed that much.
Simes Brown
Greenhorn

Joined: May 14, 2003
Posts: 6
I am, and have been for some time. I don't do much GUI work - most of what I'm working on is server-side classes - so I've not dealt with SWT very much.
I'm very fond of it, though. If it weren't already free, the refactoring support alone would be worth the money.
Simes.
Al Caplan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 27, 2003
Posts: 13
Yes, I am using Eclipse for real development. Myself and 8 others use it in working on a module with close to 500 classes, and 50 JSP's.
On it's own, it probrably would not be too usefull, but once customized with VSS plugin (makes checkin/checkout a breeze), a profiler, PMD, JFaceDbc for SQL Querying it's all I need to use. Add to that being able to run and debug any web server I need to run, it allows me to debug into my JSP's in a way I haven't been able to in the past.
Stelian Iancu
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 20, 2002
Posts: 21
I have been using Eclipse from R1.0 and I did some SWT projects (along with other, non GUI projects) with it. It is my favourite IDE.


--<br />Linux registered user 287835<br /> <br />Be different. Think.
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Many of my project's developers (including me) are using Eclipse for development. There are some glitches such as some of the source files being located in wrong directories ("com.company.utils.MyClass" is stored as "/com/company/util/MyClass.class") which prevents us from including the whole codebase in the Eclipse project but fortunately that part of code is never touched (fingers crossed)
I find Eclipse's code navigation, refactoring and general responsiveness to be of great value. I used to go with NetBeans but not anymore. Also, Eclipse's "plugin community" seems to be the most active.


Author of Test Driven (2007) and Effective Unit Testing (2013) [Blog] [HowToAskQuestionsOnJavaRanch]
David Elworthy
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 19, 2003
Posts: 1
I would add another "me too" to this. I made the change from netbeans recently - it was just too frustrating to be useful - and several of my colleagues are also using. Most of my development has been infrastructure classes, with a small amount of Swing work, and it's in every respect but one better than other Java IDEs I've used: NetBeans, SunOne, Visual J++ and the apalling VisualAge for Java.
The one thing that is missing is a good JUnit test generator. There is JUB, but it won't handle incremental additions of new methods to existing classes. NetBeans does have this, and so I occasionally switch back to it just to generate unit tests.
Carol Enderlin
drifter
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 10, 2000
Posts: 1364
5 of 6 developers on our team use Eclipse (6th uses JBuilder). We develop web apps with jsps using Struts, EJBs, web services. We use cvs to control our code, that's very well integrated with Eclipse.
[ July 08, 2003: Message edited by: Carol Enderlin ]
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
The one thing that is missing is a good JUnit test generator.
Strange. I use JUnit a lot, and have never felt the need for a "unit test generator".
I find that I use Eclipse the other way round. It works great as a "real code generator" from my tests. As I write a test, Eclipse lights up any missing classes and methods. "Quick Fix" easily allows me to create what's missing, and then it's just a case of typing in a line or two of actual behaviour into the freshly created empty class or method.
Do you write your "real code" first and then somehow expect one test per method or one per class? How does this work for tests that call more than one real method?


Read about me at frankcarver.me ~ Raspberry Alpha Omega ~ Frank's Punchbarrel Blog
Michal Bienek
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 17, 2002
Posts: 29
Working with a group of 9 designers using Eclipse. We're successfully developing large-scale client/server apps using Struts/jsps, EJBs, running on Jetty/JBoss and using a cvs repository. The very idea that Eclipse is free considering all of its features is incredible. It has managed to speed up our development time by a significant factor, specifically due to how it manages all of our projects from start to finish.
Buzz Cogs
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 29, 2002
Posts: 1
I've used Eclipse on two different projects. I'd never gotten used to using a real ide before Eclipse (I used vi on unix and textpad on Win) but I like Eclipse. I especially like the way it integrates with CVS. Right now I am trying to figure out how it works with ant.
John Sinues
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 21, 2000
Posts: 52
I use Eclipse primarily as an enhanced editor for developing DII COE segments using C++. I don't use the C/C++ plugin. In order to colorize the code, I use Colorer Library Plugin and for source code control, I use the built in CVS features which are very good.
While working on my SCJD certification, I also use Eclipse. For Java development, it is a fanastic tool for a very nominal price.
Eclipse runs well on various both Linux and Windoze, although, I slightly more polished under the latter.
Todd Chambery
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 13, 2001
Posts: 12
Presently using Eclipse with >2000 java files + >1000 non-code files. No problems, using Clearcase for source control.
siqi zhang
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 04, 2003
Posts: 3
Anybody has experience of both WSAD and eclipse
and can give a comparison bethween the two?
I mean I know WSAD is built on top of
eclipse, but is it easy to learn how to
find and install plug ins in order to
get to the same level of functionality of WSAD?
assumming that license cost is not that big
deal here (company pays).
raj madhuram
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 10, 2001
Posts: 71
I used to be a non-IDE person but Eclipse changed all that. I find myself almost twice as productive as before. Code completion and Refactoring support are excellent.
Raj
Sal DiStefano
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 28, 2002
Posts: 90
Hi
WSAD is actually built on Eclipse. From what I've seen, Eclipse is identical to WSAD without all the IBM Specific plug-ins. Many similar plug-ins are available which provide the same functionailty in Eclipse. If you look at the WSAD folders after install it is actually just an extension of a base Eclipse install.
Ed Burnette
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 10, 2003
Posts: 142
The Eclipse SDK currently has about 90 plugins. WSAD has about 500. So it must be about 5-6 times better right?


Ed Burnette, Author of Hello Android
Blog: ZDNet's Dev Connection - Twitter: @eburnette
Karthik Veeramani
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 22, 2002
Posts: 132
Yes i use it to some extent. Finding it useful in integrating with junit and ant. And in writing some clean initial code, though i can manage that myself. Its very useful with omondo plugin for drawing uml diagrams.


Thanks<br />Karthik<br />SCJP 1.4, CCNA.<br /> <br />"Success is relative. More the success, more the relatives."
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
I started using Eclipse more than a year ago at work. I am working on 40+ projects with up to 1000 classes each.
Since that time I have "infected" our whole development shop...


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
Faisal Khan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 29, 2003
Posts: 285
Yes, I am using it for all our development and other developers in the team have started looking into to take on.


The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.
Jon Strayer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 04, 2002
Posts: 133
Originally posted by siqi zhang:
Anybody has experience of both WSAD and eclipse and can give a comparison bethween the two?

WSAD is normally a release or two behind Eclipse.

I mean I know WSAD is built on top of
eclipse, but is it easy to learn how to
find and install plug ins in order to
get to the same level of functionality of WSAD?
assumming that license cost is not that big
deal here (company pays).

Yes and no. I've put together a pretty decent environment for the work I do, but the IBM tools are very good (for example, the WSAD database plugin(s) eat JFaceDBC's lunch).
It's easy enough to play with Eclipse and see how it works for you.
To find plug-ins you can go to Eclipse Plugins


Jon
Jim Chen
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 14, 2002
Posts: 1
I'm using it in J2EE project development. I really like it and introduced it to my friends. Now 6 of my friends also use Ecplise:-)
David Yutzy
tumbleweed and gunslinger
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 29, 2001
Posts: 192
My 2 cents on Eclipse...
I've tried NetBeans, JBuilder, Textpad 8) and find Eclipse much more straight forward. The class and method refactoring alone has increased my productivity (especially on maintenance work that I didn't originally code) has been a blessing.
I'd like to see more options for code generation such that I could create my own processes/templates.
Example: I have several design patterns using Struts that I'd like to be able to generate code for using the same process as the getter/setter mechanism.
Someone here mentioned about jUnit generation, however, I would find a Struts JSp generator much more useful (again, the template issue). Taking a FormBean and automatically generating a JSP file would be awesome.
I've tried many of the plugins for Struts and most are trying to do way too much. You have to basically develop your app using their process from scratch or the plugin is useless. I would find plugins that help you generate Struts code more useful than gold.
Prashanth menon
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 20, 2001
Posts: 65
I have been using eclipse for the past one year. Some how this seems to be a better IDE.
The project I am working on is on EAI. Hence these are core java programs interfacing with IBMQSeries.
So as such I donot know the benifits of using Eclipse for a GUI application. Though Eclipse is built using SWT and also has the library for the same, I have not found any plugin that provides a drag and drop environment.
One of the benifits of Eclipse is the plugins available. We use VSS plugin and Database plugin.
I have tried the Omondo plugin for UML. But this made the application heavy. Other wise this is not as sluggish as other Java IDEs
Hernando
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 08, 2002
Posts: 6
Sorry, I want to know how edit and compile JSP files on Eclipse, I had been using it for one year (and I just Love it) but I still edit my JSP files with other editors because I never found the way to use Eclipse for this porpuse.
Thanks..
Hernando
mark evertz
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 11, 2002
Posts: 22
Yes, we are using Eclipse in real world:-)
Our team is about 6 Developers. Our code base contains several 100 classes and is still growing very fast. We like eclipse very much and think that missing features (probably provided by plug-ins in the future) are compansated by the incredible good working editor. To be honest, at the moment the functionality of IDEs like NetBeans or JBuilder can't be compared to eclipse, because the are providing much more. The hunt for plug-ins isn't so time wasting as with Eclipse. But at the first place all I want is a good Java editor (the rest can be done with some simple ANT scripts and needs to be developed only 1x at the beginning of a project). I think the ROI (usability vs cost) of eclipse is more than I have thought what could be possible >2 years ago.
Greetings, Mark
harold neiper
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 12, 2002
Posts: 18
Yep, we are using it as well. Actually about 8 of us are using and slowly migrating the rest of our dev team to using it from JBuilder. We had purchased about 30k worth of licenses about 6 months ago, but the product is so slow. Eclipse is very repsonsive and with the number of plugins and native features is makes for a damn fine IDE. We mostly use it for J2EE development and use plugins for VSS as well as use Ant, and JUnit within the tool. Lots of other nice featrues as well.
Regards,
Harold
Ryan Bailey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2002
Posts: 134
I have been using Eclipse for about a year now. I use eclipse both for business and personal. I mainly use it at work for middlware which works great, once I get my environment set up and running. At home I use it for server side development. I like the fact how easy it is to utilize plugins for eclipse. Currenty I'm using the QuantumDB and Tomcat plugin.
Cheers
Ryan
[ July 15, 2003: Message edited by: Ryan Bailey ]

SCJP 1.4, SCWCD
Java: The power, elegance, and simplicity of a hand grenade
Jim Pleger
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 04, 2003
Posts: 4
Eclipse is great ... one little annoying (lack of a) feature though ... in Microsft Word, and almost every text editor I can think of, if you triple click on a line, it selects the whole line. Won't work in Eclipse, though! I reported this almost a year ago, and still it has not been fixed ... so much for open source!
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by Jim Pleger:
I reported this almost a year ago, and still it has not been fixed ... so much for open source!

Well, why don't you fix it yourself - it's open source, after all!
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
I reported this almost a year ago, and still it has not been fixed ... so much for open source!

Even if it's not a "big" feature, they're probably doing things based on priorities and they must be getting a lot of requests all the time. For example, in my (commercial) project we have some minor defects reported over a year ago and nobody has touched them because we've had our hands full with bugfixes and change requests which the client regards as more important than an extra whitespace on one webpage.
Would Borland implement a request from a single individual? Not unless the same feature has been requested by a larger audience or if they consider the feature to be of high importance otherwise.
Sherry Shavor
Author
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 15, 2003
Posts: 7
Eclipse is also being used at many universities. It is an excellent IDE to use in a Java class or basic software engineering class. The productivity improvements you get with Eclipse allows the instructor to actually cover more Java concepts in a course. In addition, it also makes it easier to see real examples of large Java frameworks. No longer do the instructors have to be restricted to silly little intro examples.
Sherry Shavor


<a href="http://www.awprofessional.com/titles/0321159640" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.awprofessional.com/titles/0321159640</a>
David Hibbs
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 19, 2002
Posts: 374
Define "real development"
I currently use it at home for open source development of projects on SourceForge. The CVS integration is really amazing, and I can configure each project based on its existing layout in CVS (or in some cases, customize it so I can focus efforts in specific sections of code). Plus, if you check in the project configuration files, anyone else using eclipse can simply import the project and start work with no effort. Sweet.


"Write beautiful code; then profile that beautiful code and make little bits of it uglier but faster." --The JavaPerformanceTuning.com team, Newsletter 039.
Allan Halme
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 22, 2003
Posts: 62
I've been using Eclipse now for a year and a half, after experience with JBuilder and NetBeans, and I'm extremely satisfied. I no longer trawl the IDE discussion threads on the net -- I know what IDE I'll be using unless forced on to something else at gunpoint by my client .
On one project we had >5000 classes, >1400 JSPs, and hundreds of assorted other files, all in ClearCase. Eclipse worked just fine and all its various source code browsing and navigation features were absolutely priceless when you had to inherit this insane codebase and get a hold of it in order to do various maintenance stuff (defect fixes, new features, etc).


<i>The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne.</i> --Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400)
Jeroen Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
Originally posted by Jim Pleger:
Eclipse is great ... one little annoying (lack of a) feature though ... in Microsft Word, and almost every text editor I can think of, if you triple click on a line, it selects the whole line. Won't work in Eclipse, though! I reported this almost a year ago, and still it has not been fixed ... so much for open source!

Maybe because it's a feature request and not a bug like you probably reported it.
If none of the regular maintainers thinks it's more important that other things it doesn't get done.
If it were not open source you'd also still be waiting unless you were a really major customer with a very expensive support contract from which they could finance the creation of the feature...
As already stated, you could download the source and add the feature yourself, then hand it back to the maintainer for possible integration into the main codebase.


42
 
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