Win a copy of Soft Skills: The software developer's life manual this week in the Jobs Discussion forum!
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

How to hide some ressources ?

 
Franck Tranchant
Ranch Hand
Posts: 75
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi
Does anyone know how to hide some ressources from a Eclipse project ?
More precisely i my own case, i'm trying to hide all *.CVS directories created by WinCVS in my project since it has nothing to do with Java.
Any info is welcome
Thanx
 
Frank Carver
Sheriff
Posts: 6920
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Eclipse is actually quite good at hding CVS directories. The trick is that you have to encourage it to load its CVS module. I do this by creating a dummy CVS repository URL and associating it with the project. After that, magically, all those CVS directories don't appear any more.
As an aside, though, are you really using CVS and Eclipse on the project, but not using Eclipse's excellent built-in CVS-integration? If so, you should investigate how to use Eclipse with CVS immediately. It's way ahead of anything else I've found in terms of straight simplicity and ease of use.
 
Joe Pluta
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1376
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Frank, what OS are you running your CVS repository on? Also, do you know of a good tutorial for using Eclipse with CVS? I've got a fairly robust network, with two machines and one Red Hat machine (not to mention an iSeries). From what I understand, the best configuration is to run CVS on the Linux box, but that's an area where I need help. The online documentation that I've found to date isn't exactly geared toward beginners.
Joe
 
Franck Tranchant
Ranch Hand
Posts: 75
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Frank,
It looked like a good trick but, since I dont have any valid repository, it doesn't work...
First, i tried to open a Team Perspective to add a fake repository URL.
Then i tried to share my project with this repository ... without success, which is quite normal
I really wonder how you manage to associate you project to a dummy repository !
Joe,
My compagny doesn't use any repository server. A shared directory on NT server does the job...
 
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff
Posts: 14112
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Franck Tranchant:
My compagny doesn't use any repository server. A shared directory on NT server does the job...

Good luck...
What did you do with WinCVS if you don't have a CVS repository?
[ August 12, 2003: Message edited by: Ilja Preuss ]
 
Franck Tranchant
Ranch Hand
Posts: 75
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Ilja Preuss:

What did you do with WinCVS if you don't have a CVS repository?

I mean, i have no repository SERVER (callable with the standard URL format (ie. :method:login@hostname/directories...)
But WinCVS allow to work with a simple shared directory on the network (ie. R:\..)
 
Frank Carver
Sheriff
Posts: 6920
  • 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Joe Pluta wrote: Frank, what OS are you running your CVS repository on?
Much as you probably suspected, I run my local CVS on a Linux box (which also doubles as my mail server, file server, web cache etc.) Your Red Hat installation should have CVS already,
I'd have thought. If not, it's real easy to install using RPM. Have you tried running whatever the Red Hat configuration tool is called in your version and looking for CVS?
The online documentation that I've found to date isn't exactly geared toward beginners.
True, but Eclipse makes using CVS so transparent, that it's really worth spending the
time to get it set up. The only thing I recall being even mildly tough was choosing where to locate the repository. I chose a subdir of a user home directory in the end, simply because it was easier to browse via SAMBA while I was getting the hang of how things work.
I use the e-smith distribution (based on RedHat) for my box, so I simply followed the instructions from http://www.e-smith.org/docs/howto/cvsinstall-howto.html
Franck Tranchant wrote: really wonder how you manage to associate you project to a dummy repository !
Hmm. I'm begining to wonder myself now!
My situation is that I have a selection of projects, which I store on one of those USB-flash-keyfob thingies. Some of these projects I manage using my CVS server in my home office, some I manage using CVS servers at sourceforge.net, and for some my clients force me to use abominations such as Continuus or PVCS. I carry the keyfob around and develop on a variety of machines, some of which have no access to sourceforge or to my home CVS.
When I work with one of the CVS projects on a machine with no CVS access, I don't want to see all those CVS directories in my face, so I know that I followed some instructions on setting up a dummy CVS repository location in Eclipse. I seem to recall I had to do some jiggery-pokery like setting up the dummy location with my project closed, maybe shutting down Eclipse, then reloading Eclipse and viewing the list of repositories before opening my project. The problem seems to be that Eclipse loads its plugins (even "built-in" ones) "lazily", and won't hide CVS directories unless the CVS plugin is loaded first. So you need to make sure the plugin is loaded before your project.
I know it works fine for me now. I make my changes at the client site behind the firewall, then bring my keyfob home and re-synch with CVS. I never see the CVS directories in Eclipse.
I hope some of this has helped. You may also want to try searching for eclipse cvs in this forum, as I know this sort of thing has been discussed before.
I mean, i have no repository SERVER (callable with the standard URL format (ie. :method:login@hostname/directories...)
But WinCVS allow to work with a simple shared directory on the network (ie. R:\..)

Man, that sounds scary. I'd be really worried about what happens if two users try and make changes at the same time. CVS updates at the file level simply level can't be atomic like they can through a server, and each WinCVS client doesn't know of the existence of the others.
Will your system admins not allow you to run one of the Windows CVS servers on a shared box?
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic