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netbeans vs eclipse

Pradeep bhatt
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Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

How does NetBeans compare with Eclipse, if there is a comparison .


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Dave Steinberg
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Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 18, 2003
Posts: 20
Pradeep,
NetBeans and Eclipse are both useful and featureful IDEs, and both provide a platform for building tools.
You won't get an unbiased comparison out of me, since I'm a big fan of Eclipse, and have much less experience with NetBeans. So, I won't try to hide my bias or anything.
Eclipse uses a highly praised plug-in architecture that makes it very easy to extend and integrate tools. As a result, there are dozens of commerical products and hundreds of open source projects based on the platform.
For the user, the difference you'll notice first is that NetBeans uses Swing for its UI, while Eclipse uses SWT. Swing is, of course, part of the Java platform, so NetBeans will run anywhere that Java does, with a consistent look and feel. SWT installs along with Eclipse. It's a lighter-weight toolkit that retains the platform's native look and feel and tends to perform better. Though it's not a part of the Java platform, SWT is widely ported.
In feature comparisons, people most often criticize Eclipse for lacking a UI builder, and most often praise it for its superior refactoring tools. Personally I find that, in terms of usability, Eclipse just rocks. Everything is well designed, from the Java editor, the task list, and the debugger, to the integration with CVS, Ant, and JUnit.
EMF is a relatively new addition to Eclipse (in fact, it's been out there for about a year now, but it seems like we're just starting to really get the word out). It adds another dimension to Eclipse's integration story: fine-grained data integration. It makes it easy for independently developed plug-ins and applications to define and share common data. You can define the structure of the data with a UML model, an XML Schema, or a set of Java interfaces, and EMF will generate efficient code to manage and persist that model data. It will even generate a GUI editor for your model. EMF is easy to use, with integrated Eclipse-based code generation tools, and easy to understand. As far as we know, there's nothing else quite like it, in NetBeans or anywhere else.
Cheers,
Dave


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Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 15299
    
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This has been discussed numerous time. If you just search this forum, you will find some valuable discussions and not have to wait on responses to your posts.


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Pradeep bhatt
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Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

How does SWT UI look like? Any screen shots :roll:
Dave Steinberg
Author
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 18, 2003
Posts: 20
Pradeep,
Depending on where you're running it, it looks just like an ordinary Windows, GTK+, Motif, Carbon, or Photon applicaiton. That's the point of SWT; it uses the native widgets.
For screen shots, trying poking around the eclipse.org web site.
 
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