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CVS questions

Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
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    6

I want to set up a CVS. I don't need one but I want to learn how to set one up and use one.
My question is pretty simple. Maybe even stupid. If I setup a CVS server and used it to check files in and out, how does the build process work? Do I have to checkout every file, build it, then checkin all the files again? Or can it be built through CVS somehow?
And how does this work for testing your app? I will be using it for web apps mainly. Can someone explain the process to me? Thanks.


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Adrian Yan
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Joined: Oct 02, 2000
Posts: 688
I think there is a big misconception about CVS in java community. CVS is not a build-process manager, or antyhing else. It's a simple version control software. Meaning, it keeps track of your souce code, that's about all it does. As far as build process goes, you can combined your ANT with CVS, have it does a daily build. You don't need to check out a file to do a build, you can simply update your copy in your local directory and does a build that that.
Gregg Bolinger
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    6

So in a development team, does every team member actually have a local copy of all the files to test with?
Ilja Preuss
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
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Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:
So in a development team, does every team member actually have a local copy of all the files to test with?

Yes. Every developer gets a copy (a Private Workspace) from the repository to work on. Once he has completed a task and tested it, he checks in his changes to share them with the other developers (preferably several times a day).
(I recently finished my review of "Software Configuration Management Patterns" by Berczuk, which explains this - and more complicated situations - in more detail.)
[ October 05, 2003: Message edited by: Ilja Preuss ]

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Ilja Preuss
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Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:
I want to set up a CVS. I don't need one but I want to learn how to set one up and use one.

I think it is *always* a good idea to use a version control system. Even when working alone, it's nice being able to compare a file to its state from a month ago, to restore deleted files, to go back to the latest "known to be good" state of the source when you screwed up your working copy etc.
You might want to take a look at subversion, which is the designated successor of CVS.
Adrian Yan
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Joined: Oct 02, 2000
Posts: 688
I definitely suggest running a version control software even if you are your own team. It's just a good idea and pratice to get into those good habit of managing your source code.
I run a CVS server at home just to track changes in my script and codes.
Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
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    6

All very good responses to my questions. I think I understand how it works now. I downloaded subversion yesterday. Their documentation is kind of lacking, but I haven't had much time to work with it yet.
Of couse, then I have to learn how to get Eclipse's CVS client working. Lots to do. Luckily this project is personal and not for work or anything.
Adrian Yan
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Actually, I recommend you to use command-line based cvs client and svn client. You can understand it better than click and drag.
Gregg Bolinger
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    6

Do you have to use a web server to communicate with a CVS over an internet connection? Or do CVS's use their own socket connects?
Lasse Koskela
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Joined: Jan 23, 2002
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    5
Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:
Do you have to use a web server to communicate with a CVS over an internet connection? Or do CVS's use their own socket connects?

All you need is CVS--it provides its own server software.


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Charles Hasegawa
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Joined: May 22, 2003
Posts: 117
Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:
Of couse, then I have to learn how to get Eclipse's CVS client working. Lots to do.

I found Eclipse's CVS client set up was very easy. Since you are going to be trying this out on your own, you'll probably find that CVS feels a lot like a fancy version of Eclipse's local history (except you can tag and branch in CVS and each time you check in changes you can add a comment).
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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