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Do you need Maven if you are using an IDE

 
Arun Kumar
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Hi All

When do I need Maven? Am I missing something in my build process?

I have Rad as my Development Environment, there is an option in RAD to just right click and create jar or WAR file of your project then why do we have to use another build tool

I am not familiar with Maven but from the tutorials I can see that the Project structure of Maven(POM) is some what different from the once created using RAD

I am confused can some body please shed some light on this topic
 
Ilja Preuss
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Take a look at http://www.coderanch.com/t/107054/tools/If-IDE-Why-ANT - it's about Ant, but the principles are the same.
 
Tim Holloway
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Just to repeat myself: IDEs are wonderful, but I always recommend you have a way of building in batch.

First and foremost, I've discovered over the years that the average developer maintains a lot of context in their IDE that doesn't get propagated out to version control. So if I take someone else's project and import it, I can easily spend a day+ getting it to build in my installation of the identical IDE. This is assuming that everyone's using the same IDE. For batch builds, it's mostly a matter of acquiring and additional canned external libraries the project needs - which is something Maven can do automatically.

Secondly, IDEs tend to change significantly between releases, Very often (more like inevitably, for Microsoft IDEs I've worked with), the build process will break. More time lost.

Thirdly, IDEs require a lot of resources. If you want to raise the odds that you can build in an emergency when things are going wrong, a batch build is easier to set up and more likely to work.

Finally, in my environments, the actual production builds are done on a machine that lacks a GUI. No GUI, no IDE. Not a problem for batch builders.

This is not to say I'm anti-GUI. Try and take away my IDE and you'll lose fingers. However, I always try and have an offline build option - generally Ant or Maven.
 
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