File APIs for Java Developers
Manipulate DOC, XLS, PPT, PDF and many others from your application.
http://aspose.com/file-tools
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Java and MacOS X

George Brown
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2000
Posts: 919
Has anyone here tried using Mac OS X as a platform for java development? I have been reading about quite an enthusiastic uptake of the OS X platform for java. Anyone got any views on this?
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
Likewise, I don't have any direct experience, but there seems a lot of interest. I can't see much point in moving from Windows and Linux for my uses, but maybe next time I'm looking ...


Read about me at frankcarver.me ~ Raspberry Alpha Omega ~ Frank's Punchbarrel Blog
Buzz Andersen
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 28, 2001
Posts: 54
I use Mac OS X for Java and *love* it! While Java was a kludge at best on the old (classic) Mac OS, on OS X it truly shines. Here are a few reasons why I love OS X for Java:
1. It has a unique status as the only "mass-market," consumer OS to support Java out-of-the-box. When you are developing Java on Windows (as I do at work), you are essentially in hostile territory. When you develop it on the Mac, you are working on a platform that has fully embraced Java.
2. From a UI standpoint, Apple has done a better job than Sun. Apple's Swing implementation is very good, and a Java app done properly could easily pass for a native app in terms of look-and-feel and responsiveness.
3. Apple's VM has some thoughtful features--my favorite is the "-Xdoc:name=<application name>:icon=<path to icon file>" that allows you to easily make your Java app behave more like a native app.
4. Apple includes a lot of nice developer tools for Java, and you can even use Project Builder to turn your application into an OS X application bundle. This makes your application *indistinguishable* from a native app (icon and all) without sacrificing your code's portability (the application bundle is just like a wrapper).
Right now the only thing holding Apple back is that everyone is still waiting for word on when their version of Java 1.4 will be released. Other than that, as both a Java and Mac fan, I couldn't be happier!
Buzz
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: Java and MacOS X