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Java on a Mac?

RJ Cavender
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 26, 2006
Posts: 51
Ive scraped along trying to learn Java on my XP machine, now I am thinking about getting a new iMac. Are there suitable IDE's for the Mac environment? Anybody here had experience with programming Java on a Mac?
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

Absolutelty! In fact, a large number of javaRanch staff, myself included, use OS X on Macs for development.

All the major IDE players work just fine on a Mac, as do open source utilities and servers such as Tomcat, Ant and ilk.

The only drawback I can think of to Java on the Mac is that the latest Java version lags behind those available for the other platforms. That's not an issue for those just trying to get work done -- who aren't going to use the latest version until it's well-proven in the field anyways -- but may impact those that need to be on the bleeding edge at all times.


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Kaydell Leavitt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 18, 2006
Posts: 688

There are three free Java IDEs for Mac that I'm aware of: 1) XCode from Apple (for Mac only), 2) Eclipse free open source, and 3) NetBeans which is also free open-source.

I'm using Eclipse because I'm developing cross platform desktop applications.

NetBeans sounds good because Sun is endorsing it, Sun's tutorials reference NetBeans and now there is an upgrade path from the ultra-academic BlueJ to real-life NetBeans, and NetBeans has a Swing GUI editor built-in

I'm sticking with Eclipse for now, but I'm keeping an eye on NetBeans.

As for the JDK version, if you buy and iMac now, I think it will come with JDK version 5 installed as the default version of Java, and some of the older versions of Java installed as alternate versions. For Java 6, I think you'd have to download the pre-beta, developer preview version 6 in which you should be able to run the tutorial code from but you wouldn't want to ship for Java 6 until Apple declares it production software.

Kaydell
[ June 10, 2007: Message edited by: Kaydell Leavitt ]
RJ Cavender
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 26, 2006
Posts: 51
Thanks a lot. Ever see an iMac 24"? BEAUTIFUL machine....but if i get it, I dont want to lose the ability to develop.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

Originally posted by RJ Cavender:
Thanks a lot. Ever see an iMac 24"? BEAUTIFUL machine...


Droolable.

but if i get it, I dont want to lose the ability to develop.


No, in fact you will find your development capabilities quite enhanced if you can wrap your mind around a unix command line (or even if not).
Gregg Bolinger
GenRocket Founder
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 15286
    
    6

NetBeans sounds good because Sun is endorsing it...

That has to be the worst reason to ever use anything I've heard in a while. The JDK being the exception, I tend to run screaming from anything Sun endorsed (EJB, JSF, Netbeans, etc). Screaming I tell you, screaming.


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Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

Things may have changed, but last time I was forced to use Netbeans I would rather have stuck toothpicks through my eardrums.
Kaydell Leavitt
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Joined: Nov 18, 2006
Posts: 688

That's good to know.

Kaydell
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24166
    
  30

And of course IntelliJ IDEA is available for the Mac, and I vastly prefer it to Eclipse (although Eclipse isn't toothpick-inducing, it's still no IDEA.)


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Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

Aside: IntelliJ is my IDE of choice as well.
[ June 21, 2007: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
Frank Tollenaar
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 18, 2006
Posts: 18
I just got a Mac myself. Eclipse runs without any trouble, but it's more the 'sidekicks' that are not available for OS X, or don't work.
ClearCase client tool is one of them. Very important if you use ClearCase.
Skype behind a proxy is another pain.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

Originally posted by Frank Tollenaar:
Skype behind a proxy is another pain.


What's the proxy have to do with OS X?
Kaydell Leavitt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 18, 2006
Posts: 688

...I tend to run screaming from anything Sun endorsed (EJB...


What would you use instead of EJBs? Spring?

Kaydell
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 60049
    
  65

I've been writing enterprise-level web apps from over 7 years and never used EJBs. Or Spring. Or any of the other large Rube Goldberg frameworks.
Kaydell Leavitt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 18, 2006
Posts: 688

I'm splitting this thread into the EJB forum, as suggested, since I'm getting off-topic now, here in the Mac OS X forum.

Continued

Kaydell
[ July 24, 2007: Message edited by: Kaydell Leavitt ]
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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