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How will XML change the software industry?

 
Paul Wilson
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One important concept in the software industry is the notion of the "proprietary file format." Software vendors like Microsoft fix it so you have to use their programs to get a file in their format. XML promises to change all that with a self-documenting, portable, validatable format for saving data. It could open up new markets for little guy programmers. Can anyone guess how Microsoft will try to stop it?
 
Frank Daly
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MXML?
 
Kevin Williams
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I think that, from everything I've seen, Microsoft is going to be much more of a team player with regards to XML than it has been with other platforms (J++, anyone?) in the past. They have stated openly that XML will be the backbone of their future products, including their .NET software development suite. They've been part of the development of XML almost since the beginning, and I think they're not going to try to come up with their own version anytime soon.
- Kevin
------------------
Kevin Williams
Senior System Architect, Equient Corporation
author of: Professional XML Databases
 
Ajith Kallambella
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My two cents worth..

  • XML will reduce, if not eliminate, the cost of online transactions because of its portability.
  • XML will tremendously reduce the time-to-market factor for eCommerce and web portal companies.
  • XML will eventually become the de-facto standard for data exchange and hence all major vendors will support XML.
  • Better search engines.
  • HTML will stay, but most probably as XHTML.


  • ------------------
    Ajith Kallambella M.
    Sun Certified Programmer for the Java2 Platform.
 
Hemanth Presingu
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XML Will slowly replace the current EDI standards and that will be a huge market. Moreover XML can also be used by corporations for communication of data between diverse applications and or systems.
-Hemanth
 
Kevin Yip
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"Microsoft have stated openly that XML will be the backbone of their future products, including their .NET software development suite."
Yes, that's the way MS got the market share. Once a certain level is reached, you'll see what it'll do next.
 
Nathan Pruett
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IntelliJ IDE Java Spring
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I agree with Kevin... .NET is Microsoft's bid to try to dominate web development with a propriatory software package... they will work as hard as they can to push XML standards now... but when .NET v 2.0 comes out it will have some kind of M$XML++ with propriatory extensions that work better on M$ platforms and screw everyone else...
On the other side of the coin... Microsoft may be pushing XML standards so hard because it is their only chance to make software that produces platform-independent output... something that should be important to them when M$ Windows starts to die out as a platform. (Hopefully soon... )
Anyway, just my $0.02...
-Nate
 
erich brant
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Mark my words! Ms will try to Hijack XML! They cannot be
trusted in any way shape or form! In the past they
tried ( and failed ) to change the TCP/IP standard!
Article on that at www.oreilly.com.
Also, they tried to change the Java programming language with
J++ and failed via a court battle.
But with changing C++ via their compiler, Com/Com+ and Dcom
are not standard ansi/iso C++ thus they are trying to
move the language in that direction. Com is very similar
to Corba! I wonder way?
With dhtml and javascript, MS's IE 4.0/5.0 and 5.5 are
not compatible with www.w3.org standards.
With XML they did change the XML standard with Soap , but
ibm and sun and to my knowledge W3.org liked it and are making
it standard XML.
So, again if history is a guide, MS will try and may or may not
succeed in hijacking xml.
Quote: "A leopard never changes its spots and MS is no different!"
 
Paul Wilson
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It stands to reason that if the key to market share is the ability to push a proprietary file format any move to an open standard such as XML will be seen as a threat.
If it wasn't for the proprietary file format thing, a bunch of folks from JavaRanch could get together, put out a pretty good facsimile to MSOffice2000 (100% Java:fully cross platform) and sell it for 10 bucks. How would Bill Gates feel about that. The ability to save data in XML makes it possible for just that kind of thing to happen.
[This message has been edited by Paul Wilson (edited January 24, 2001).]
 
ram mohan
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Hi erich brant,
U have mentioned about SOAP.Can u briefly say what is that SOAP?
I think I am not asking anything silly
Rgds
ram
[This message has been edited by ram mohan (edited January 24, 2001).]
 
Ajith Kallambella
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Ram,
Here is the SOAP Box from Uncle Bill .
------------------
Ajith Kallambella M.
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java�2 Platform.
 
George Brown
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Originally posted by Paul Wilson:
... XML promises to change all that with a self-documenting, portable, validatable format for saving data ...

This is a bit of an aside, but I wonder about this term self-documenting. Don't you mean self-describing? I have yet to find a technology or tool that reliably does the documentation for me (some case tools have tried with limited success).
 
Brett Knapik
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For the most part XML is self documenting, anybody could understand what
<gretting>
hello!
</greeting>
means, so it depends on the developer of the DTD/Schema to make it self documenting.
------------------
I wish there was a button on my monitor to turn up the intellegince.
Theres a button called 'brightness' but it doesn't work
 
Anil Vupputuri
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Originally posted by Brett Knapik:
For the most part XML is self documenting, anybody could understand what
<gretting>
hello!
</greeting>
means, so it depends on the developer of the DTD/Schema to make it self documenting.


Hi Brett Knapik,
There is no need to have a DTD/Schema for a well-formed XML.DTD only makes XML file to be valid.
All XML documents, both DTDless and valid, must be well-formed:
if there is no DTD in use, the document should start with a Standalone Document Declaration (SDD) saying so:

<?xml version="1.0" standalone="yes"?>
<foo>
<headline>Happy <pic/>Chinese New Year</headline>
<text>Happy XML</text>
</foo>

Valid XML files are those which have a Document Type Definition (DTD) like other SGML applications, and which adhere to it. They must already be well-formed.
A valid file begins like any other SGML file with a Document Type Declaration, but may have an optional XML Declaration prepended:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE advert SYSTEM "http://www.foo.org/ad.dtd">
<advert>
<headline>Happy <pic/>Chinese New Year</headline>
<text>Happy XML</text>
</advert>

Thanx.

Anil

[This message has been edited by Anil Vupputuri (edited January 25, 2001).]
 
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