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Software by numbers -- two basic questions

Naveen Gabrani
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 12, 2000
Posts: 25
I have two basic questions --
a) Is there a software development organization that is already using MMFs and IFMs.
b) Most traditional product companies in their first release try to include the bare minimum features that are sufficient to sell the product. In future releases they attempt to add more fancy features. In this sense are all these companies using MMFs and IFMs.
Jane Cleland-Huang
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 28, 2004
Posts: 32
Is there a software development organization that is already using MMFs and IFMs.

Yes - we know of several organizations that are adopting at least some of the IFM practices. I'd have to say though that we are still in the period of "early adopters". We are hoping to expand our website shortly with testimonials etc of these early adopters. IFM is a win-win situation, because it provides you with an analysis that means you only follow the approach IF it makes sense for your project.

b) Most traditional product companies in their first release try to include the bare minimum features that are sufficient to sell the product. In future releases they attempt to add more fancy features. In this sense are all these companies using MMFs and IFMs.

This is true, and in fact in the book we specifically point out that the idea of incremental delivery is certainly not new. What IFM offers that is new, is the ability to reason about the financial impacts of different incremental breakdowns and delivery sequences. For example, you could compare the benefits of a linear development schedule, vs. a concurrent one, vs. a hybrid approach in which you gradually ramp up the work. The new thing about IFM is its ability to inform us of the impact of those decisions.


Jane Cleland-Huang PhD<br />DePaul University<br />jhuang@cs.depaul.edu<br /><a href="http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/jhuang" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/jhuang</a>
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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