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process control

marys joseph
Greenhorn

Joined: May 14, 2004
Posts: 20
hi,

In our company(small) we would like to control the development "process".

we were having only 2 projects before and now we are having more than 10 at hand, and many new hires are going to be in another 4 months.

We write requirement documents based on "Mastering requirement process" book. we do a little design, using UML tool. so that is it..

What are the things your company does to control the process.

is there any kind of training available for this? we do it by only "book" knowledge and we are not sure if we are doing it correct.

thanks,
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
First, you probably shouldn't *control* *the* process. The reason is simple: every project needs its own process, and will probably even need to change its process over time, adjusting it to the current situation.

So, what you want to do is *train* your teams, helping them to choose their process, to gather the right metrics to see how they are doing and to decide how adapt the process to improve. Early and often feedback and reflection is *vital* for this.

Personally, I like XP as a starting point. It provides rather concrete practices to start with, and tons of feedback.

Whatever process you start with, it's quite easy for beginners to misinterprete the book knowledge, though - to miss the main points and concentrate on unimportant things. Having someone experienced on the team will significantly increase your chance of success. If you have the resources, definitely hire an experienced coach, at least to get you started. Preferably, try to find someone who isn't fixed on a specific process, so he is more likely to actually concentrate on helping you instead of selling his process. Be especially cautious if he wants to sell you some tools!


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
marys joseph
Greenhorn

Joined: May 14, 2004
Posts: 20
Thanks for your reply.

I did not clearly explain what I wanted to know, but gave me the answer. :-)

we are not in position to hire someone right now, can you point me to some training classes ?

thanks a lot for your help,
dinaker prasad
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 11, 2004
Posts: 27
if you are starting to look out a process that fits your organization [with limited knowledge about process], i suggest you might want to look at spiral process development[plan driven][on which most of the process are based on] and agile development [non-plan driven]- combining both is good way of achieving displine and flexibility in software development. they will give you a good insight into the kind of process that might best fit your organization goals.

thanks
Dinaker
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by marys joseph:
we are not in position to hire someone right now, can you point me to some training classes ?


Depends on where you are in the world...

For the US/UK, Object Mentor, ThoughtWorks and Industrial Logic are quite well known in the Agile-/XP community.

You might also want to take a look at http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?XpTrainingClasses and ask for references at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/extremeprogramming/
Scott Ambler
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 12, 2003
Posts: 608
Looks like you're dealing with cross-system issues, you've got 10 projects in the hopper. It's likely overkill for you but the Enterprise Unified Process (www.enterpriseunifiedprocess.com) addresses cross-system issues.

Knowing about the issues, such as portfolio management and enterprise architecture, is the first step in dealing with them.

- Scott


<a href="http://www-306.ibm.com/software/rational/bios/ambler.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Scott W. Ambler</a><br />Practice Leader Agile Development, IBM Rational<br /> <br />Now available: <a href="http://www.ambysoft.com/books/refactoringDatabases.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Refactoring Databases: Evolutionary Database Design</a>
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
The most interesting processes imposed on my project have nothing to do with how we do things inside the project, but how we interact with other groups. Frinstance the people who: order servers, install them, provide 1st level prod support, deploy database changes, deploy WARs and EARs and so on. It's helpful to have a good roadmap of who you need to talk to at various stages of the project and what deliverables they'll be providing or expecting. You have to be careful building the roadmap because people will come out of the woodwork trying to impose reviews and gates before a project can go live.


A good question is never answered. It is not a bolt to be tightened into place but a seed to be planted and to bear more seed toward the hope of greening the landscape of the idea. John Ciardi
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Originally posted by Stan James:
The most interesting processes imposed on my project have nothing to do with how we do things inside the project, but how we interact with other groups. Frinstance the people who: order servers, install them, provide 1st level prod support, deploy database changes, deploy WARs and EARs and so on. It's helpful to have a good roadmap of who you need to talk to at various stages of the project and what deliverables they'll be providing or expecting. You have to be careful building the roadmap because people will come out of the woodwork trying to impose reviews and gates before a project can go live.

I know exactly what you're talking about. Sigh.


Author of Test Driven (2007) and Effective Unit Testing (2013) [Blog] [HowToAskQuestionsOnJavaRanch]
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
I was trying to sit on both sides of the fence there ... The roadmap is a good thing because it can be very bad to forget one of those partners on the way. Early in the web days, one business group contracted an outside company (thousands of dollars a day, two guys in a garage) to build a web site. When it was all done and paid for they took it to the enterprise to install. They said, that doesn't meet our standards, you can't put it on our servers. Oops.

The roadmap can be bad because some people don't want to help you so much as to put together a very impressive process document and look busy.

If you get the chance to design a roadmap, get everybody together early and agree on some deliverables that everyone can use. It's a major pain to present the same information to every group, copied into their required templates over and over. I wound up putting all of our doc on a Wiki and putting links in all the questionnaires. Heh heh.
David Deans
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 10, 2004
Posts: 3
>we are not in position to hire someone right now, can you point me to some training classes?

Joseph, try this related training course list at InferData
http://www.inferdata.com/training/processandmethods.html
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: process control