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What tools are discussed?

 
Tony William
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By looking at the TOC of the book, tools in different areas (such as Code Management, build script, issue tracking etc) are discusse.

Are the software / tools discussed mainly open-source? or in fact commercial software that the reader needs to buy so that we can try?
 
Jared Richardson
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Originally posted by Tony William:
By looking at the TOC of the book, tools in different areas (such as Code Management, build script, issue tracking etc) are discusse.

Are the software / tools discussed mainly open-source? or in fact commercial software that the reader needs to buy so that we can try?


We kept the book topics as language and vendor neutral as we could, but included language specific resouces in the appendixes. I've also set up an online version here.

We've provided links to both open source and commercial vendors, but honestly, you can almost always set up the entire system with open source software if you're willing to invest the time. One of the blog entries that I haven't written yet is how I would set up a shop if I was starting from scratch.

So, no, there are no tools you'd have to buy to try these ideas out.
 
Barry Andrews
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Does the book talk about the pros and cons of using open source tools/libraries in a software project?
 
Jared Richardson
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Originally posted by Barry Andrews:
Does the book talk about the pros and cons of using open source tools/libraries in a software project?


No. Ship It! focuses more on using a tool. We have no strong preference for closed source versus open. Find a tool that works and use it. To me, it's better to use a any source code management tool (open or proprietary) than no source code management at all.

Some environments really want the support contracts that come with a commercial product (however there are more companies offering similar support for open source products these days). Other companies with tight budgets tend to want open source because the up front cost is lower.

Personally, I've spent enough time at startups to be a confirmed cheapskate and generally use open source tools when they are available. I've also run into bugs in the past that we've been able to fix, which is also nice.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
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