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Ship it - what a person may get if he know all the processes?

ankur rathi
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Joined: Oct 11, 2004
Posts: 3830
What position a person can get in any software company, if he/she know all the processes very well and which one is to use when.

Thanks.
Tony William
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Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 54
how about a post called Senior Consultant in the software architecture and process consulting department?


MCP, MCP+I, MCSE(NT4), MCSE+I, MCSE(2000), MCDBA, MCSD(VS6)<br />SCJP 5.0, SCBCD 1.3<br />ICED(v5.0), ICSD (WSP5.0)
Rudy Harianto
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Joined: Dec 01, 2003
Posts: 94
Technical and business consultants if you're not in the project.
But if you're running a project, you can be either a Project Manager or Software Architect. If your company have a R&D department, you could be the Chief Technology Officer


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4, SCBCD 1.3, SCJA<br /> <br />blog: <a href="http://jroller.com/page/rharianto" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://jroller.com/page/rharianto</a>
Gian Franco
blacksmith
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Joined: Dec 16, 2003
Posts: 977
I think it depends on the company and on the
person's other capabilities.

Roughly making a distinction of a developing-software
company and a non-developing-software company.

In a developing-software company the role of
such a person would probably reside in the
project management levels. And if (s)he has
no hands-on experience with real development
then there will be a lot of sceptic developers
doubting the usefulness of his/her role

On the other hand, in a non-developing-software
company, that person could be a consultant
performing long to medium term activities to
get things rolling in other companies.

Alternatively, he/she can give lectures in a
University.

Cheers,

Gian
[ August 04, 2005: Message edited by: Gian Franco Casula ]

"Eppur si muove!"
Jared Richardson
author
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Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 113
Originally posted by rathi ji:
What position a person can get in any software company, if he/she know all the processes very well and which one is to use when.

Thanks.


Knowing process well can move you into leadership positions like tech lead or manager. The ability to guide a team of developers through a sustainable software process and create product over and over is very valuable.


Check out <b>Ship It! A Practical Guide to Shipping Software</b><br /> <br /><a href="http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/prj/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/prj/</a>
Scott Ambler
author
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Joined: Dec 12, 2003
Posts: 608
There's a big difference between "knowing all of the processes", which I doubt is feasible, and having the skills to lead a team. The best leaders that I know have very good communication and collaboration skills and are strategic thinkers. They are knowledgeable about software development, but most importantly they realize that they don't know everything.

If you want to get ahead in your organization, first identify the type of role that you think you'd like, then identify the people in that role who are doing a good job, then work with them to gain the skills that you need.

- Scott


<a href="http://www-306.ibm.com/software/rational/bios/ambler.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Scott W. Ambler</a><br />Practice Leader Agile Development, IBM Rational<br /> <br />Now available: <a href="http://www.ambysoft.com/books/refactoringDatabases.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Refactoring Databases: Evolutionary Database Design</a>
ankur rathi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 11, 2004
Posts: 3830

If you want to get ahead in your organization, first identify the type of role that you think you'd like, then identify the people in that role who are doing a good job, then work with them to gain the skills that you need.



True, But usually we don't have freedom to choose the team, we want to work with...
Jared Richardson
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 113
Originally posted by rathi ji:


True, But usually we don't have freedom to choose the team, we want to work with...



Can you voluteer on some open source projects on evenings and week-ends?
Tony William
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Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 54
Jared,

what kind of open source project it would be? Does it helps in opening the shop?
Jared Richardson
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 113
Originally posted by Tony William:
Jared,

what kind of open source project it would be? Does it helps in opening the shop?


Volunteering on an open source projet gets you experience writing code, working with a team, etc. If you want to learn about testing, you volunteer to write tests. If you want to learn about distributed systems, find a distributed project ~or~ a project that is adding a distributed layer.

In addition to the experience, you also making friends. When you open your software shop, these friends (who are all developers) may be in a position to refer work to you. Potential clients may have already heard of you, etc.
Tony William
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 54
Frankly speaking, except being an end user, I haven't get involved in a open source project before.

If I get involved, it is common that the tech lead (the most active volunteer? or person in charge) of the area will become my coacher / mentor. Well, I don't expect receiving training, but will the lead give me direction, material or information that I need to know before I start doing the realy work. Or, the lead expect me to be kind of experienced developers in that area before accepting me to take part in the project?
Rudy Harianto
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 01, 2003
Posts: 94
about an open source project, I still don't get it..
Who's our supervisor? what are our responsibilities? how are the job separations? How can we sure that no overlaping that 2 people doing the same job?
and so much more questions..

Can anybody give me the nutshell?
Jared Richardson
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 22, 2005
Posts: 113
For Rudy and Tony. Find an open source project that's active. I'm going to suggest you look at CruiseControl, Maven 2, or (for a much less active project) Cobertura as examples.

Subscribe to both the users and developers mailing list and just watch them for a few days. Try to at least look at every message. Get a feel for how people are working, the questions they are asking, etc.

Use the product you are looking at. When you have questions about how to use them, ask. When you have feature suggestions, post them the list. In short, get involved as a participant.

Over time you'll see how the system works. There is usually a single project owner who has appointed a small number of code committers. Then lots of people dontate code that the commiters review and then add to the project.

If someone has an idea of a feature to add, they discuss it on the list, ask the committers for ideas on how to add the feature, etc.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
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