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Coding Speed matter?

Harris Tanu
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 05, 2006
Posts: 24
I'm not addressing the performance of an application but rather how fast a programmer deliver a solution.

I tend to see different pace of delivering solution between one programmer and another. My questions are:
-how to measure that someone is too slow in delivering a solution?
-and does speed really matter?
Jeroen T Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 21, 2006
Posts: 1847
Quality is always more important than speed.
Maintainability is also more important than speed.

If one person delivers a solution that doesn't scale, crashes frequently, and is impossible to maintain, he's actually less productive than someone who takes a few more days (or weeks, depending on project size) to deliver something that is rock stable, easy to maintain, and scales well.

Sadly many performance reviews still look only at lines of code produced per time unit (or similar broken definitions of performance) because that's easy to measure.


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Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 13, 2005
Posts: 39834
    
  28
If you work in healthcare, as I used to do, you find out that number of patients treated counts for a lot.
In some places numbers treated takes priority over whether they are very ill or not
It's not only in computing that people count what it easy to the exclusion of what matters.

CR
Harris Tanu
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 05, 2006
Posts: 24
Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:
Quality is always more important than speed.
Maintainability is also more important than speed.


Good programmer can release a stable solution much faster than a normal programmer.
As team leader what is the suggestion to increase programmer's efficiency instead of looking at faster delivery of the solution?
Jeroen T Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 21, 2006
Posts: 1847
happy programmers work harder, well rested programmers make fewer mistakes.

Programmers are kept happy with interesting work and training, as well as an unlimited supply of softdrinks.
Programmers stay well rested by not overtaxing them, don't assume they'll work 10 hours straight per day and then switch to 16 hour days for a month at the end of the project and stay alert.

Give highly trained intelligent people mind-numbing assemblyline work with no compensation or rest and they'll not be motivated, which reflects poorly on productivity and the quality of the deliverable.

As programmers are more and more equated with shiftworkers in factories when it comes to working conditions that will more and more become apparent.
Lasse Koskela
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 23, 2002
Posts: 11962
    
    5
Keeping in mind the fact that "speed" and "productivity" are not the same thing...
Originally posted by Harris William Tanu:
I tend to see different pace of delivering solution between one programmer and another.

I believe it was Fred Brooks who first brought up the idea that a good programmer is 10 times as productive as a mediocre one. Some recent encounters in the corporate world have made me believe the productivity difference between the best and worst programmers must be closer to several magnitudes.

Some developers simply can't get a thing working in six months that another developer takes a couple of days to implement without a single defect.


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Jeanne Boyarsky
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Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30938
    
158

Coding speed also needs to be compared with the percentage of time spent coding. If a senior developer codes faster but spends 75% of his/her time in meetings, the code may not appear faster even though the rate is faster.


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Harris Tanu
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 05, 2006
Posts: 24
I believe it was Fred Brooks who first brought up the idea that a good programmer is 10 times as productive as a mediocre one. Some recent encounters in the corporate world have made me believe the productivity difference between the best and worst programmers must be closer to several magnitudes.


it is interesting to know there is definition of good programmer vs mediocre programmer.
I believe, a good programmer doesn't only know deep concept of programming but also creative enough in coming out with solution.
ogical way.

I know, many books on good leadership and one of the author is John Maxwell.
But is there any good references/books describing defining good programmer and how to be one?
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by Harris William Tanu:

But is there any good references/books describing defining good programmer and how to be one?


The one I know that comes closest is "The Pragmatic Programmer".


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
Harris Tanu
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 05, 2006
Posts: 24
I was recommended for the 2nd time the same book.
Thanks I'll go and grab this.

Vielen Dank.
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Kein Ursache!

"Practices of an Agile Developer" also looks interesting. Haven't read it yet, though.
Raghavendra nandavar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 26, 2005
Posts: 231
Originally posted by Harris William Tanu:
I was recommended for the 2nd time the same book.
Thanks I'll go and grab this.

Vielen Dank.


You can find the information online here
 
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