• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Code Craft - Agile or RUP or ...?

 
Fintan Conway
Ranch Hand
Posts: 142
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Peter,

Would you say that the practices in your book would make a programmer / programming team more Agile?

How would these practices fit into an RUP development methodology?

Is Code Craft something entirely different from these "S/W development methodologies"?

Thanks,

Fintan
 
Pete Goodliffe
author
Greenhorn
Posts: 24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The concept of "Code Craft" is just a neat and catchy way to summarise the idea of crafting code in a careful, thoughtful, pragmatic way. To code with the correct *attitude*.

As for what "methodology" it is, it isn't a methodology. The stuff in this book is as suited to a RUP-programmer as it is to an agile programmer.

Having said that, I personally lean towards agile development. I'm currently doing XP and can't adequately describe the benefits that the process brings.
 
Scott Ambler
author
Ranch Hand
Posts: 608
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
RUP can be instantiated in an agile manner if you choose to. You can even download several agile versions of the UP, including OpenUP and Agile UP.

- Scott
 
Frank Martinig
Ranch Hand
Posts: 59
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is the software development world divided between "agile" (good) and "non-agile" (bad)? Is an agile version (instantiation) of (R)UP better than the non-agile? The software development world (and contexts) is more complex than a simple "labelling" of processes ;o) Carefully crafting code is already a good step to software project success...
 
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff
Posts: 14112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Frank Martinig:
Is the software development world divided between "agile" (good) and "non-agile" (bad)?


I wouldn't say "divided" - it's more like a continuum. There certainly are "more Agile" and "less Agile" approaches to software development, although that's certainly not the only interesting property.

Is "more Agile" better? I very much prefer to work in an Agile way (that is, in a way that respects the Agile values and principles) - both because I like it better, personally, and because I think that it leads to better results. You will have to decide for yourself, though.

Is an agile version (instantiation) of (R)UP better than the non-agile?


If I'd had to bet, I'd always bet on the "more Agile" team, everything else being the same.

The software development world (and contexts) is more complex than a simple "labelling" of processes ;o)


Being Agile certainly won't guarantee success. And being Agile is definitely more complex than just "labelling" the process you are using.

I can't imagine a context in which the Agile values and principles wouldn't be a good idea, though.

Carefully crafting code is already a good step to software project success...


Sure - that's probably why carefully crafting code (with a lot of feedback) is an important part of Agile development.

It won't help you when you carefully craft code the customer doesn't need, of course. That's why there also is a lot of planning, communication etc. involved.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic