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Implementation Patterns - yet another set of Design Patterns?

 
Raghavan Muthu
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Hello Kent,

I have gone through the book description. It looks very great and i am sure there are so much valuable inputs are waiting for the developers.

Is it again going to be some set of Design Patterns like GOF? or any other new strategies/methodologies?

Also looks like a bit of UML is associated with it. Aint I?

Thank you.
 
Kent Beck
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Dear Raghavan,

Implementation patterns are smaller scale than design patterns. While a design pattern describes relationships between objects, implementation patterns describe relationships within objects, like how the methods relate to each other or how the fields relate to the methods.

I use a few diagrams in describing the patterns, but they aren't in any formal notation.

Regards,

Kent Beck
Three Rivers Institute
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Originally posted by Kent Beck:

Implementation patterns are smaller scale than design patterns. While a design pattern describes relationships between objects, implementation patterns describe relationships within objects, like how the methods relate to each other or how the fields relate to the methods.



That sounds interesting to know Kent.

Thank you
 
Hendy Setyo Mulyo
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Hi Kent,

Does your book teach us the best practices of how to use implementation patterns when we decide to build a framework? Is your book also suitable for Junior Level Programmer?
Thank you.
 
Lasse Koskela
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Originally posted by Hendy Setyo Mulyo:
Does your book teach us the best practices of how to use implementation patterns when we decide to build a framework?

Is there an assumption here about the best practices for building a framework being different? Is that necessarily true?
 
ledc
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Mr. Beck,

From what I have read of the various posts so far, a prime reason to use implementation patterns is to establish a common method of writing code so that the original code is more clear to future programmers that may maintain the code. Is this correct?

I am struggling to learn more than I did getting my undergrad degree. Do you feel implementation patterns should be taught in addition to development and design patterns?
 
Kent Beck
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Hendy and Lasse,

One thing I learned in writing this book is that implementation patterns for application writers and framework writers *are* different. In application development I assume I can refactor the whole code base, so I minimize complexity. In framework development, though, I can't refactor the whole code base but I need to maintain freedom to change the design in the future. In writing frameworks, then, I am willing to add some complexity to the design to preserve the ability to change the design in the future.

For example, if I add an operation to an interface in an application, I go to all the implementors and add the operation. In developing a framework, I might introduce a new version of the interface (FooListener2) with the additional operation. My code is more complex because it has to handle both interfaces (and probably with an ugly instanceof), but users aren't inconvenienced.

Regards,

Kent Beck
Three Rivers Institute
 
Kent Beck
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Laura,

The key change I would like to see in the undergraduate curriculum is to put programming in context. I would rather hire a programmer who knows less about how to program and more about why to program--business, social, and personal reasons. Implementation Patterns fits well into such a curriculum because it invites programmers to look beyond their interaction with the computer, to consider the needs of other programmers who will read this code later.

It sounds like you are a recent graduate. What do you wish you had learned in school that you didn't?

Regards,

Kent Beck
Three Rivers Institute
 
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