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Clean Code: Where to start?

Michelle Parker
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 23, 2008
Posts: 5
Do you have any basics that a new Java programmer can work on to have the best possible code when starting out (in addition to buying your book)?

Thanks,
Mischelle
Katrina Owen
Sheriff

Joined: Nov 03, 2006
Posts: 1364
    
  17
In addition to starting on page 1 of Clean Code, I would suggest

The Cattle Drive (I'm biased, I volunteer around those parts)

If you are very new to Java and Object Oriented programming in general, I would suggest reading Head First Java

Also, I would suggest looking at Design Patterns or - if that one seems a bit daunting - Head First Design Patterns

The Pragmatic Programmer is another title that is great. It talks a lot about practices that aren't necessarily related to naming variables and how many lines a class or method should contain.
Jeff Langr
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 14, 2003
Posts: 762
Sorry about the plug, but if you're new to Java, and want to learn "the agile way," which includes how to keep the code clean, Agile Java is another book to consider. It tries to teach Java using test-driven development (TDD) and also introduces some of the concepts that you'll read about in Clean Code.


Books: Agile Java, Modern C++ Programming with TDD, Essential Java Style, Agile in a Flash. Contributor, Clean Code.
Robert Martin
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 02, 2003
Posts: 76
Originally posted by Michelle Parker:
Do you have any basics that a new Java programmer can work on to have the best possible code when starting out (in addition to buying your book)?

Thanks,
Mischelle


Work closely with others. Critique each other's code. Get some old hands to show you what THEY think might be clean. Attend user groups and participate in pair programming sessions, coding dojos and the like.

And, of course, read, read, read. Books are good, but better yet, read other people's code. Read lots of other people's code. Learn how and why those people do things -- both the good and the bad.

Writing software is a craft. The best way to learn a craft is by working closely with other crafstpeople, and by learning from masters.


---<br />Uncle Bob.
 
 
subject: Clean Code: Where to start?