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Clean Code: Agile toolkit

Paul Wallace
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 09, 2006
Posts: 40
Hi,

What do you consider the essential "agile toolkit" that a developer should use, for example:

Dependency Injection - to enable mock objects to be inserted into unit tests, what DI frameworks would you consider?
Testing Frameworks?

What else?

Regards,

Paul
Jair Rillo Junior
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 27, 2008
Posts: 114
- Decoupling your code (DI is an excellent approach) - You can use Spring, Google Guice or even EJB3
- Unit Testing and Integration Testing - In Both, you can use JUnit + Any mock object framework (I like JMock + Hamcrest)
- Automatic build process - I use Maven instead Ant
- SVN or CVS - SVN is better in my opinion
- Refactoring - A good IDE, like Eclipse, can help you in this task
- Keep your code as much simpler as possible.
- Paper, Pen and a Dashboard


Regards, Jair Rillo Junior
http://www.jairrillo.com/blog, SCJA 1.0, SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4, SCBCD 5.0, IBM SOA Associate (Test 664).
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
I would add index cards, and since recently also planning poker cards.

You don't need a DI framework to practice dependency injection, by the way. In my experience, simple DI through constructor parameters works just fine most of the time. In many cases it seems to me that the flexibility of a DI framework isn't needed at all and the additional indirection just makes it harder to understand and navigate the structure of the system.


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
Robert Martin
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 02, 2003
Posts: 76
Originally posted by Paul Wallace:
Hi,

What do you consider the essential "agile toolkit" that a developer should use, for example:

Dependency Injection - to enable mock objects to be inserted into unit tests, what DI frameworks would you consider?
Testing Frameworks?

What else?

Regards,

Paul


The best agile toolkit is a good brain and a disciplined attitude. The rest is just gravy. Of course I really like IntelliJ as an IDE. Eclipse is pretty good too. And I use JUnit and Emma.

Dependency Injection is useful, but I hate all the XML files. (XML is God's way of punishing us for writing ugly code. ;-)

I like JMock, but use it sparingly since heavy use of these mocking tools leads to very fragile tests.


---<br />Uncle Bob.
Jean-Claude Rouvinez
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 26, 2003
Posts: 35
Robert Martin wrote:
Originally posted by Paul Wallace:
Hi,

. . .

I like JMock, but use it sparingly since heavy use of these mocking tools leads to very fragile tests.


Hi,

We are going to use JMock in our project. Do you still agree, that this mocking tool leads to very fragile tests? I personally don't think so.
J.-Claude
 
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subject: Clean Code: Agile toolkit