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Future of WebServices

Joe Harry
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Joined: Sep 26, 2006
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Guys,

What would be it?? Will there be some organization like W3C to lay out some rules that should be followed so that the real power of web services start taking effect?? I mean how exactly the world of web services will take effect with respect to the enterprise web projects?


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4 - Hints for you, Certified Scrum Master
Did a rm -R / to find out that I lost my entire Linux installation!
Ulf Dittmer
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Joined: Mar 22, 2005
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  70
I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but there are plenty of standards in the WS world (some would even say too many). The W3C itself is behind some of them (e.g. SOAP, WSDL), other important ones are backed by different organizations like OASIS. You can find a list of some of them here.

What do you mean by "the real power of web services start taking effect"? WS and SOA are being discussed and implemented just about everywhere - they are having a big impact.
Rahul Bhattacharjee
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Joined: Nov 29, 2005
Posts: 2308
Without standardization these technologies take us no where.One system would talk language X and another would talk language Y.This doesn't make much sense.
[ June 26, 2007: Message edited by: Rahul Bhattacharjee ]

Rahul Bhattacharjee
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Eva Van Shtock
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Joined: Jun 02, 2006
Posts: 28
I think the real power of the web will be manifested when the adoption of the semantic aspects of the web are widely used.

The dream is S/W autonomous agents roam the active web in their attempt of satisfying our complex tasks.
Theodore Casser
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Joined: Mar 14, 2001
Posts: 1902

Originally posted by Rahul Bhattacharjee:
Without standardization these technologies take us no where.One system would talk language X and another would talk language Y.This doesn't make much sense.


Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see the problem with that, actually.

As it is, my office uses (primarily) Java on our system (I'm cross-tasked in .Net as well)... but the bulk of the systems at our client use Microsoft technologies. By using web services, we're able to talk between systems without having to write complicated code to interface between the two. It's a nice way to keep things agnostic as far as development environments between departments/companies/industries.


Theodore Jonathan Casser
SCJP/SCSNI/SCBCD/SCWCD/SCDJWS/SCMAD/SCEA/MCTS/MCPD... and so many more letters than you can shake a stick at!
Rahul Bhattacharjee
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Joined: Nov 29, 2005
Posts: 2308
Originally posted by Theodore Casser:
Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see the problem with that, actually.


Hi Theodore Casser , you are not missing anything.May be the way I write (express in words )is not effective .It sometimes give wrong meaning.My bad.

I was not talking about underlying technology , rather I was talking about the communication language or protocol which should be standardized by some organization.

As now we have standard for sending messages for invocation of WS using SOAP ,WSDL for defining a WS and UDDI for discovery of WS from a registry , so we can say that it is standardized.Imagine many protocols for doing the above mentioned tasks.In that case making a inter operable systems would be difficult.
Theodore Casser
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Joined: Mar 14, 2001
Posts: 1902

Ah, I'm understanding better now, I think, what you're trying to say.

I think there's nothing to worry about quite yet when it comes to the underlying protocols. Beyond the basics, there are always going to be proprietary extensions that work best within a given product range - look at the variation in the application servers available in the Java EE space and how they work with products from their own provider. As long as the market is moving the way it is, there's a dis-incentive for any company to do something that pulls their product out of compatibility with other web service providers.

But as long as the basic functionality is there, something that is truly language agnostic, then I don't think there's a real concern for the direction it's moving.
Peer Reynders
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Joined: Aug 19, 2005
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    5
SOAP and the associated WS-* standards are part of the overall WS-* SOA vision. However using these technologies to simply make your web site/application machine-accessible could be considered overkill (satire: REST vs. WS-*: A Parable). So it is important to be on the lookout for other emerging standards like WADL (Introducing WADL; GlassFish: Web Application Description Language; TR-2006-153).
 
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