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EJB object and Skeleton

 
vikasids sharma
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hi all
Well i m confused .I have read skeletons in almost every EJB book/refrence .Whether EJB objects and skeletons are two different entities or are same.if they are altogether different entities...
Let me know why do we our EJB object(cotainer specific object) implements rmi.remote interface,when a call is delegated from skeleton itself(which implements remote interface) to EJB object. Implementing remote interface makes any object network enabled. So when skeletons are there for every EJB object and they delegate the method call to ejb object .wotz the fun of making ejb object as network enabled?
 
Arun Shanmugham
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Hi,
As long as i know , defeinitely the object and skeleton are two different object, whether u take the case of EJB or simple RMI objects. Skeleton and stub are created by the EJB container for communicating with actuall object along the Network. We are implementing remote interface to enable the EJB object to communicate remotely with the client.
Cheers
Arun
 
somkiat puisungnoen
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Please see detail in Chapter 2 EJB Fundamentals of Mastering EJB second edition.
I think it useful for this question.
 
vikasids sharma
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Originally posted by Arun Shanmugham:
When we have skeletons which delegate calls to ejb object.It means skeletons are surrogate to ejb object. They do have copy of methods to be delegated to ejb object. why do ejb objects are network enabled?
Hi,
We are implementing remote interface to enable the EJB object to communicate remotely with the client.
Cheers
Arun
 
Arun Shanmugham
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Hi Sharma,
I mean we are not implementing remote interface on EJB Object. We are just implementing SessionBean or EntityBean on EJB Iobject. But we are extending EJBObject interface (which is derived from java.rmi.Remote) only on the remote interface which is going to form stub on clientside and skeleton on server side. And anyway that task is handled by the container. But it can indirectly give response to remote clients through Remote Interface which makes them look like network enabled.
Cheers
Arun
 
vikasids sharma
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Thatz ok Arun...as per concept of creating remote interface(application specific) is concernd.
So we extend rmi.remote interface to our application specific remote interface for creating stubs and skeletons i.e to provide surrogates for container specific ejb object.
Can we say to have reference of this ejb object at client side ,we(container) makes it network enabled?
Can we conclude it by saying this. OR
Originally posted by Arun Shanmugham:
Hi Sharma,
We are just implementing SessionBean or EntityBean on EJB Iobject. But we are extending EJBObject interface (which is derived from java.rmi.Remote) only on the remote interface which is going to form stub on clientside and skeleton on server side. And anyway that task is handled by the container. But it can indirectly give response to remote clients through Remote Interface which makes them look like network enabled.
Cheers
Arun
 
Arun Shanmugham
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Hi Sharma,
Yes, exactly.. i guess we can conclude by saying that.
Arun
 
Vishwa Kumba
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This is a good basic question, helps in understanding the difference
between client stub, server skeleton, EJB Object and the bean instance.
A nice one guys..
 
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