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Developing with C#

HS Thomas
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
What would be the equivalent technologies if I wanted to develop the assignment in C# ?
regards
Bharat Ruparel
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 30, 2003
Posts: 493
I am puzzled by your question. What are you after?
Regards.
Bharat


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Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
This is actually something I've wondered about: I'm guessing webservices for RMI, and maybe the default gui classes for Swing. Otherwise, everything would be pretty much the same.
M


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Andrew Monkhouse
author and jackaroo
Marshal Commander

Joined: Mar 28, 2003
Posts: 11422
    
  85

I am guessing that you should be able to use IIOP within C#, in which case you might even be able to mix and match your components.


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James Hook
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 20, 2003
Posts: 18
There is .NET remoting that looks soooooooo similar to RMI. I heard
at a Microsoft Developer talk that somebody at Microsoft came up with the design of .NET remoting independently. hmmmmmm.....
Tony Collins
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 03, 2003
Posts: 435
Is C# a product of J++ ?
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
Not exactly. C# seems to be Sun's answer to Java. It's an elegant programming language, apparently strongly based on Java(even more so then Java was based on C++), that seems to offer strong integration within the Windows environment, and significantly weaker integration outside of it( check out the Mono project). IMO, it's a good tool.
My own rule is this. If you need enterprise development, and you're working exclusively on windows, and you can afford visual studio, then use C#. Otherwise, Java's your answer.
M
Miguel Roque
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 24, 2002
Posts: 126
Hello.
C# seems to be Sun's answer to Java
I believe that you want to say that C# it's Microsoft response to Java .
I've read about .NET and C# and I must say that it's a good language and there is other thing that I like in C# that is the fact that it was designed by the same guy that as created the Delphi language and Delphi is my main language and a very powerfull one.
Miguel
HS Thomas
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
I'd learn C# because it is similar to Java , both which have commercial benfits in doing so.
I'd also read up on Smalltalk and Smalltalk Design Patterns because it embodies OO concepts so well, I hear. These have not much commercial use anymore.
But I doubt I'd have time to learn any more languages.
Are there any others you'd add to your craftperson's toolkit ?
regards
Billy Tsai
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 23, 2003
Posts: 1297
I was forced to learn C# in university and do its assignments but I hated it, however I still managed to pass that course anyway I have forgot everything about C# already
HS Thomas
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
Billy , an opportunity missed!
People with C# skills are highly sought after now. Java 1.5 is all about catching up with C#. If you had honed your C# skills along with Java perhaps you'd have been snapped up long ago.
It's not too late. With your abilities I am sure you can catch up with C# again. What you learnt at Uni, perhaps, isn't the latest version.
Billy, you are too much in a rush. (Not that it's a bad thing, but not all the time!).
regards
 
 
subject: Developing with C#