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IDE Question

Ian Roberts
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Joined: Aug 20, 2003
Posts: 46
I am about 80-90% near completion on my assignment and have been using Sun Forte for Java (Studio One) IDE with JSDK of 1.4.2.
I was wondering what other IDE's have been or being used? The ffj4 IDE can be a little slow, even on a whizzy machine! Very much doubt I will change now but does anyone know of any problems with ffj4 that I should be aware of?
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
Hi Ian,
I generally advocate textpad for the SCJD.
All best,
M


Java Regular Expressions
Xie Ruchang
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 25, 2003
Posts: 160
Eclipse 3! Fantastic refactoring, Javadoc support and debugging.
Performance is first class because of SWT!
amchi gelo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 01, 2002
Posts: 75
I use IBM's Websphere Studio Application Developer. Its very good for quick development and debugging. After I am done, I plan on doing the rest of the formalities manually.


Sun Certified Web Component Developer 1.4<br />Sun Certified Java Developer 1.4<br />IBM Certified Associate Developer - WebSphere Studio, V5.0 (285)<br />IBM Certified Specialist - IBM WebSphere Application Server, Adv Single Server Edition for Multiplatforms, V4.0 (158)<br />IBM Certified Solutions Expert - IBM Websphere Studio V4.0 (487)<br />IBM Certified Specialist - IBM Visual Age for Java V4.0 (283)<br />Sun Certified Java Programmer 1.2
alzamabar
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Joined: Jul 24, 2002
Posts: 379
I use Eclipse 3 and it's very nice, also because within its settings it's possible to adhere to the coding convention required by the SCJD.
Marco


Marco Tedone<br />SCJP1.4,SCJP5,SCBCD,SCWCD
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
While all of the above are fantastic IDEs, a developer should really know how to write nontrivial code from the ground up, including resolving classpath issues, rmic compile issues, etc. An IDE can rob you of that experience.
If you already know how to do all of that, then by all means, use your favorite IDE. However, if you don't, you should learn how, and this is the prefect time to do so.
All best,
M
[ March 03, 2004: Message edited by: Max Habibi ]
alzamabar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 24, 2002
Posts: 379
Originally posted by Max Habibi:
While all of the above are fantastic IDEs, a developer should really know how to write nontrivial code from the ground up, including resolving classpath issues, rmic compile issues, etc. An IDE can rob you of that aexperience.
If you already know how to do all of that, then by all means, use your favorite IDE. However, if you don't, you should learn how, and this is the prefect time to do so.
All best,
M

I'm thinking of writing only the sources with the IDE, but then managing all the compilation, classpath, jaring and running activity from the command line, also because I must watch at my application from the examiner's point of view, who is not said that will have Eclipse (otherwise she could be fired from Sun!). However, having an IDE that closes braces and brackets, Javadocs, that automatically performs indentation when required it's handy.
Javini Javono
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 03, 2003
Posts: 286
Hi,
I tend to use "IDE's" for Java applications which I use essentially as text editors.
I then type in the commands myself to compile and the like, or I build .sh or .bat
files to compile complete systems (or use my own homegrown "ant-like" application
(though not like ant in that it depends on an underlying .sh command files) which
without being told, figures out which classes create which applicatons (based on
the existence of .sh files and main() methods, and perhaps another hint)
So, a great text editor is JEdit at www.jedit.org,.
If TextPad refers to a third-party (i.e., non-Microsoft Windows application, then I've
known people who quite liked it).
You'll also need the JBrowser plug-in,
the ErrorList plug-in, and the console plugin (so you can type in commands). If you
work out of one directory, such as suncertify/code/, there's not much need for class paths;
so, my Sun project makes no reference or use of classpaths whatsoever, since there are
no third-party .jar files to reference (for JUnit, I simply extract the class files so that they
are also available from the root directory, and class paths are not needed).
JEdit gives you everything you'd expect, while leaving you in complete control in building
your own application. I use the current, latest version of JEdit.
You can combine JEdit with a tab remover/enabler so that you can use Tabs within JEdit
and then automatically remove them for your final code, replacing each tab with the
appropriate number of spaces. But, you'd have to take a prior posting, which is the main
class, and then build the supporting classes around it yourself.
This is not to say that other IDE's are not also great. But, I hate having my application
"placed into a project" per say. Particularly when I write java code for Mac, Windows,
and Unix, this can become annoying. For instance, Apple's xcode, which has its good points,
loves to add lots of Mac specific stuff, when I want a pure Java application .jar file which will
be double-clickable on any platform. Also, by remaining "Project independent" I can at will
use either xcode or JEdit as I see fit. Basically, I like my "project" to be directly represented
in the directory structure, and not hidden or abstracted away; ideally, then, my project
stays in one place, and I can at will apply any IDE to it I desire at any time, if the IDE is
flexible enough to allow this. Aside: I'd be interested in knowing why IDE's are always
so interested in creating "projects." I should be able to give the IDE a "hint", such as
suncerity/code/ is my project, and let it figure out the rest, or ask a few pointed questions
once.
JEdit has other plug-ins, but those are the basics. JCompiler, I think it's called, is good
in that it compiles everything very quickly, which, afterall, was one point of your original
post! So, if you want speedy compiles, JEdit with the JCompiler plug-in will give you
blazing fast compiles, and any errors are in the ErrorList plug-in, you click on an error,
and it automatically opens the file and brings you to that error point in the .java file.
Thanks,
Javini Javono
[ March 03, 2004: Message edited by: Javini Javono ]
Ian Roberts
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 20, 2003
Posts: 46
Originally posted by Max Habibi:
While all of the above are fantastic IDEs, a developer should really know how to write nontrivial code from the ground up, including resolving classpath issues, rmic compile issues, etc. An IDE can rob you of that experience.
If you already know how to do all of that, then by all means, use your favorite IDE. However, if you don't, you should learn how, and this is the prefect time to do so.
All best,
M
[ March 03, 2004: Message edited by: Max Habibi ]

Max, although I do appreciate your comments on using a simple text editor and command line compilation and execution, in a real commercial world most developers use an IDE not a text editor. I spent fifteen years coding on mainframes and my days of using an IBM TSO text editor are long gone! Any developer worth their weight in salt will always test that the application developed under an IDE can also be executed successfully using command lines. I agree you do need to be aware of not using vendor specific APIs and you do need to check the format of the code has not been changed (i.e. tabs instead of spaces). The way I have approached the development is to use the IDE for everyday work tasks but then to check the format and execution of code using a text editor and command lines.
This may not be the best approach (I agree) but I cannot face yet another text editor to start code from scratch!
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
Hi Ian,
I agree with you: in production, use an IDE. However, my opinion is that, for this assignment, you'll get more from using a simple text editor. If you don't already know how to do all that yucky stuff the IDE does for you, this is a really good time to learn.
When something goes wrong with your IDE(and it will), you'll want to know how to hand compile /deploy your EAR on the server. Even if you use an ANT script, you need to be able to debug it. Again, just a suggestion.
M
Xie Ruchang
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 25, 2003
Posts: 160
I agree with Max to a certain degree but beg to differ. I was using Eclipse and I do not know how to generate Javadoc for my project. I don't even know Javadoc tags. With Eclipse, I got help on how to do the task first and defer the learning of the exact commands and steps later. I think this very helpful. Instead of groping in the dark with a bare Editor, I learn what are possible using the IDE and subsequently explore the detailed mechanics of doing it.
2 cents worth.
[ March 04, 2004: Message edited by: Frankie Cha ]
Ian Roberts
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 20, 2003
Posts: 46
Originally posted by Max Habibi:
Hi Ian,
I agree with you: in production, use an IDE. However, my opinion is that, for this assignment, you'll get more from using a simple text editor. If you don't already know how to do all that yucky stuff the IDE does for you, this is a really good time to learn.
When something goes wrong with your IDE(and it will), you'll want to know how to hand compile /deploy your EAR on the server. Even if you use an ANT script, you need to be able to debug it. Again, just a suggestion.
M

Max, I think we are saying the same thing and that is if you don't know how to use simple command line requests than develop outside the scope of an IDE to learn how. This is particularily important for this assignment because the assessors are not going to deploy and execute using an IDE but command lines or that is my assumption.
What I was trying to suggest is that if you do know how to use command line instructions then using an IDE will speed up your development, so long as you test the format by viewing it on a text editor and execution using the command line. I would not encourage anyone on this assignment to develop with an IDE alone. What may work on an IDE may not work when executed via the command line due to a simple overlook or mistake.
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
Hi Ian,
What I was trying to suggest is that if you do know how to use command line instructions then using an IDE will speed up your development,
Ahh, in that case, I completely agree
M
 
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subject: IDE Question