aspose file tools*
The moose likes Programmer Certification (SCJP/OCPJP) and the fly likes Is there any newsletter for scjp? Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Certification » Programmer Certification (SCJP/OCPJP)
Bookmark "Is there any newsletter for scjp?" Watch "Is there any newsletter for scjp?" New topic
Author

Is there any newsletter for scjp?

pavan kalyan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 15
Hi all
this is my first post here, I find this place heaven for scjp aspirants, but unfortunately I have only a mailserver at my college and the net center is miles away, I have loads of doubts to clear so if there is any newletter for scjp where I can get info or questions or anything which helps my preperation pl post the url I will check it comming sunday.
Hope there is a reply.
harpreetsingh
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 08, 2000
Posts: 6
yes pavan you can find one at http://www.anilbachi.8m.com happy preperation.
[This message has been edited by harpreetsingh (edited November 15, 2000).]
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Pavan, there is "the Question of the Day" on http://www.examcram.com/, if you subscribe they will send you a question every day and answer for it the next day.


Uncontrolled vocabularies
"I try my best to make *all* my posts nice, even when I feel upset" -- Philippe Maquet
Marcus Green
arch rival
Rancher

Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
I assume you mean that you can get email easily but not browse the web.
If you sign up for the discussion at www.jchq.net/discus you can click on an option so you receive the messages as emails. You can't post via email but you will be able to follow the discussions of the other posters.

------------------
http://www.jchq.net Mock Exams, FAQ, Tutorial, Links, Book reviews
=================================================
Almost as good as JavaRanch
=================================================


SCWCD: Online Course, 50,000+ words and 200+ questions
http://www.examulator.com/moodle/course/view.php?id=5&topic=all
Marcus Green
arch rival
Rancher

Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
Also I have just noticed you can receive an emailed digest of the posts to this here JavaRanch forum. See the link at the top.
Marcus

[This message has been edited by Marcus Green (edited November 10, 2000).]
pavan kalyan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 15
Thanks all for your help I really got what I need.
pavan kalyan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 15
Hi, I found something useful which might help others like me this is what iwas looking for,
///////////copied from anilbachi's site//////////////
SCJP Exam simulation software just for you with 120 practice questions.
receive 3 new sample practice scjp questions every day
Also receive the solutions with detailed explanation
So if your average preparation time is 2 months you get 2 mock exams
be informed about the changes in sun certification
receive a scjp faq everyday
a free webpage where you can display your online resume and many more as this is only the beginning some.
A unique draw every week where you could be the one to receive the archive of the entire resource http://www.anilbachi.8m.com which includes every page from this site!!! Wov!!!(draw every sunday)
All these right in your mail.
/////////////////////////////////////////////
This is excellent service by anil for aspirants.
the url is http://www.anilbachi.8m.com/docs/certification/redirect.htm
Bye.
sumankumar
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 13, 2000
Posts: 3
Hi
thanx for the info it will help me I didn't noticed these things I can be off for some time while I get my email posts.
harpreetsingh
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 08, 2000
Posts: 6
hey pavan have u got ur newsletters pl mail me the newlsltters if u have got them before I did not find the previous newsletters. Sorry for this post.
Ajit how do I get the mailids of the person who posted here to talk to him private.
pavan kalyan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 15
Hi harpreet,
I too did not find any link for the previous newsletters Ihave mailed anil and he promised to deliver me so I will get intouch with as soon as he delivered it to me. He also promised me an exam simulation with 120 questions. I will pass it on to you.
Ok.
atin sehgal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 12, 2000
Posts: 32


Hi Pavan,
Thanks for this eal gr8 info.
I will just chk the sitye & see the stuff.
regards

sukumar
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 16, 2000
Posts: 1
Hi,
can you pass on those newsletters my id is sukumar_reddy2@yahoo.com.
Thnx.
Ajith Kallambella
Sheriff

Joined: Mar 17, 2000
Posts: 5782
harpreetsingh,
Next to the date and time stamp there is a little icon with question mark. If you click on the link, it will open another browser window which will display the profile of the user who posted the particular message. The profile should include the email id if the user provided the information during registration.
Ajith


Open Group Certified Distinguished IT Architect. Open Group Certified Master IT Architect. Sun Certified Architect (SCEA).
Ajith Kallambella
Sheriff

Joined: Mar 17, 2000
Posts: 5782
'sumankumar', 'sukumar' and 'harpreetsingh',
PROPER NAMES ARE NOW REQUIRED!!
Please Read the JavaRanch naming policy for more details.
Javaranch appreciates your cooperation to comply with the official naming policy.
Ajith
Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 29, 2000
Posts: 8521
if you go to http://developer.java.sun.com/index.html and hit the link on "subscribe to free JDC newsletters" Sun will send you a weekly e-mail called JDCTechTips that is very good.
Attached is a sample:
*****************************
J D C T E C H T I P S
TIPS, TECHNIQUES, AND SAMPLE CODE

WELCOME to the Java Developer Connection(sm) (JDC) Tech Tips,
August 15, 2000. This issue covers:
* Manipulating Java Arrays
* Java I/O Redirection

These tips were developed using Java(tm) 2 SDK, Standard Edition,
v 1.3.
You can view this issue of the Tech Tips on the Web at http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/TechTips/2000/tt0815.html
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
MANIPULATING JAVA ARRAYS
If you've done much Java programming, you're probably familiar
with the use of Java collections such as Vector and ArrayList.
For example, you can create a collection and add an element to
it by saying:
List lst = new ArrayList();
lst.add(new Integer(37));
In this particular example, an integer value 37 is used to
construct an Integer wrapper object, which is then added to
the list.
This simple example illustrates a fundamental point about
collections -- they are used to manipulate lists of objects,
where each object is of a class or interface type. So, for
example, an ArrayList can be composed of objects of types
such as Object, String, Float, and Runnable. Collections
do not work on lists of primitive type, such as an array
of integers.
If you're using primitive arrays in your program, how can you
manipulate them? This tip illustrates several techniques you
can use.
The first technique is sorting. The java.util.Arrays class
contains a set of class methods for sorting and searching
arrays. For example, you can say:
import java.util.Arrays;
public class ArrayDemo1 {
public static void main(String args[]) {
int vec[] = {37, 47, 23, -5, 19, 56};
Arrays.sort(vec);
for (int i = 0; i < vec.length; i++) {
System.out.println(vec[i]);
}
}
}
The demo initializes an array of integers, and then calls
Arrays.sort to sort the array in ascending order.
In a similar way, you can do binary searching on a sorted array:
import java.util.Arrays;
public class ArrayDemo2 {
public static void main(String args[]) {
int vec[] = {-5, 19, 23, 37, 47, 56};
int slot = Arrays.binarySearch(vec, 35);
slot = -(slot + 1);
System.out.println("insertion point = " + slot);
}
}
There's one tricky aspect of this particular program. If the
binary search fails to find the requested element in the array,
it returns:
-(insertion point) - 1
The demo program calls the search method with an argument of 35,
which is not in the array. The method returns a value of -4. If
the value -4 is incremented and then negated, the result is 3;
this is the point at which 35 would be inserted into the array.
In other words, the values -5, 19, and 23 occupy locations 0, 1,
and 2 in the array. The value 35 therefore belongs at index 3,
with the values 37, 47, and 56 pushed down. The search method
does not actually insert 35 into the array, but just indicates
where it should go.
Beyond sorting and searching, what else can you do with
primitive arrays? Another useful technique is to take an array
of primitive type and turn it into an equivalent Object array.
Here each corresponding element is a wrapped version of the
primitive element. So, for example, a value 37 in the primitive
array becomes Integer(37) in the wrapped array.
Here's how you can do this:
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.lang.reflect.Array;

public class ArrayDemo3 {

// if input is a single-dimension primitive array,
// return a new array consisting of wrapped elements,
// else just return input argument

public static Object toArray(Object vec) {

// if null, return

if (vec == null) {
return vec;
}

// if not an array or elements not primitive, return

Class cls = vec.getClass();
if (!cls.isArray()) {
return vec;
}
if (!cls.getComponentType().isPrimitive()) {
return vec;
}

// get array length and create Object output array

int length = Array.getLength(vec);
Object newvec[] = new Object[length];

// wrap and copy elements

for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
newvec[i] = Array.get(vec, i);
}

return newvec;
}

public static void main(String args[]) {

// create a primitive array

int vec[] = new int[]{1, 2, 3};

// wrap it

Object wrappedvec[] = (Object[])toArray(vec);

// display result

for (int i = 0; i < wrappedvec.length; i++) {
System.out.println(wrappedvec[i]);
}
}
}
The method "toArray" takes a single Object argument (arrays can be
assigned to Object references). If the argument is null, does not
represent an array, or represents an array of other than primitive
type, the method simply returns the argument. java.lang.Class
facilities are used to determine whether the argument is an array,
and to obtain the array's underlying component type.
Once these checks are made, reflection facilities from the class
java.lang.reflect.Array are used to obtain the length of the
primitive array, and then obtain individual elements of the array.
Each element obtained by Array.get is returned in a wrapper such
as Integer or Double.
A final example builds on the previous one, and shows how you can
use collection features with arrays. This assumes you already have
an Object array. Here's the program:
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
public class ArrayDemo4 {
public static void main(String args[]) {
Object vec[] = {new Integer(37), new Integer(47)};
List lst = Arrays.asList(vec);
lst.set(1, new Integer(57));
for (int i = 0; i < vec.length; i++) {
System.out.println(vec[i]);
}
}
}
In this program, vec is an Object array containing Integer(37)
and Integer(47) objects. Then Arrays.asList is called. It returns
a collection (of interface type List), with the array as the
backing storage for the collection. In other words, a collection
like ArrayList has within it some type of storage to store
collection elements. In this example, the storage that is used is
the passed-in array argument to Arrays.asList. This means that
changes made by collection methods (such as set), are reflected
in the underlying array.
Changing the element at index 1 in the collection causes the
underlying array to change, and the output of running the program
is:
37
57
So if you have an Object array, you can use collection features
with it; the array itself serves as the underlying storage.
It's also possible to take a collection and convert it to an
Object array, by saying:
Object vec[] = lst.toArray();
For further information, see sections 11.2.9 Arrays, 16.6 List,
and 16.9 The Arrays Utility Class in "The Java Programming
Language Third Edition" by Arnold, Gosling, and Holmes
(http://java.sun.com/docs/books/javaprog/thirdedition/).
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
JAVA I/O REDIRECTION
If you've worked with UNIX or Windows shells (command processors)
very much, you've probably used I/O redirection operators such as
this:
$ command >outfile
This usage says to run a command, and direct its standard output
(such as that written by System.out.println) to the specified file
instead of to the console or screen.
This feature is quite useful. However it's possible to achieve the
same objective inside of a Java application, without relying on
a shell. Typically, if you're using a programming style that relies
on standard input and output (as the UNIX shell and utility programs
do), you don't need or want to redirect I/O from inside a program.
But sometimes there are exceptions to this rule. Let's look at a
couple of examples.
The first example redirects standard output to a file:
import java.io.*;

public class RedirectDemo1 {
public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {

// set up a PrintStream pointing at a file

FileOutputStream fos =
new FileOutputStream("out.txt");
BufferedOutputStream bos =
new BufferedOutputStream(fos, 1024);
PrintStream ps =
new PrintStream(bos, false);

// redirect System.out to it

System.setOut(ps);

// do some output

System.out.println("This is a test\u4321");
int n = 37;
System.out.println("The square of " + n +
" is " + (n * n));

ps.close();
}
}
Standard output (System.out) is a reference to an object of type
PrintStream. To redirect output, an object of this type is
created, representing a file or other output stream (such as
a network connection). Then System.setOut is called to change
the System.out reference.
As a point of interest, the JDK 1.3 implementation of
java.lang.System has internal code of this form:
FileOutputStream fdOut =
new FileOutputStream(FileDescriptor.out);
setOut0(new PrintStream(
new BufferedOutputStream(fdOut, 128), true));
This code is used to initialize System.out. So, by default,
System.out is a PrintStream. The PrintStream represents a special
FileOutputStream file created from FileDescriptor.out, with
a 128-byte buffer, and with autoflush set to true. Autoflush means
that output is flushed on new line characters and when byte
vectors are written. When output is redirected as in the example
above, System.out is changed to reference the new PrintStream
object that was created and passed to System.setOut.
There are a couple of issues related to the RedirectDemo1 program.
One is that PrintStream converts characters to bytes using the
platform's default character encoding. This is usually a good
thing. For example, if you have a short Java program with the
following line in it:
System.out.println("this is a test");
and you run the program by saying (in the United States English
locale):
$ java prog >outfile
the program will direct ASCII characters to "outfile". This is
probably what you want, given the prevalence of 7-bit ASCII text
files.
But there's a problem in that the Unicode character '\u4321'
in the demo program has turned into a single '?' byte. You can
see the ? if you look at the out.txt file. In other words, the
default encoding doesn't correctly handle one of the output
characters.
Another issue is that I/O redirection can be generalized. You can,
for example, send output to a string instead of to a file. Here's
an example that covers both of these issues:
import java.io.*;

public class RedirectDemo2 {
public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException {

// set up a PrintWriter layered
// on top of a StringWriter

StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(sw);

// write some output (to the StringWriter)

pw.println("This is a test\u4321");
int n = 37;
pw.println("The square of " + n + " is " + (n * n));

// get a string containing what was written

String str = sw.toString();

// display it

System.out.print(str);

// output the string to a file, using
// the UTF-8 encoding

FileOutputStream fos =
new FileOutputStream("out.txt");
OutputStreamWriter osw =
new OutputStreamWriter(fos, "UTF-8");
BufferedWriter bw =
new BufferedWriter(osw);
bw.write(str);
bw.close();

// read back the string and check

FileInputStream fis =
new FileInputStream("out.txt");
InputStreamReader isr =
new InputStreamReader(fis, "UTF-8");
BufferedReader br =
new BufferedReader(isr);
String s1 = br.readLine();
String s2 = br.readLine();
br.close();

String linesep = System.getProperty("line.separator");
if (!str.equals(s1 + linesep + s2 + linesep))
System.err.println("equals check failed");
}
}
The first part of the example sets up a PrintWriter object layered
on top of a StringWriter. PrintWriter is similar to PrintStream,
but operates on characters instead of byte streams. StringWriter
is used to accumulate characters into a dynamic internal buffer
for later retrieval into a String or StringBuffer.
After the output is written to the StringWriter, the accumulated
string is retrieved. The string is then written to a file using
OutputStreamWriter and the UTF-8 encoding. This encoding is
supported in all Java implementations. It encodes Java characters
in the range '\u0001' through '\u007f' as one byte; other
characters are encoded as two or three bytes.
Finally, the string is read back from the file, again using the
UTF-8 encoding. The string is then compared to the original string.
The original string had two line separators in it, and so it is
read back as two strings. The line separators are added to build up
one string for comparison.
Note that you can also redirect input from a file or string, using
classes such as StringReader.
Further reading: sections 9.7.1 Character Encoding, 15.4.7
String Character Streams, 15.4.8 Print Streams, and 18.1.1
Standard I/O Streams in "The Java Programming Language Third
Edition" by Arnold, Gosling, and Holmes
(http://java.sun.com/docs/books/javaprog/thirdedition/).
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
- NOTE
The names on the JDC mailing lists are used for internal Sun
Microsystems(tm) purposes only. To remove your name from a JDC
mailing list, see Subscribe/Unsubscribe below.

- FEEDBACK
Comments? Send your feedback on the JDC Tech Tips to:
jdc-webmaster@sun.com

- SUBSCRIBE/UNSUBSCRIBE
The JDC Tech Tips are sent to you because you elected to subscribe.
To unsubscribe from this and any other JDC Email, select
"Subscribe to free JDC newsletters" on the JDC front page. This
displays the Subscriptions page, where you can change the current
selections.
You need to be a JDC member to subscribe to the Tech Tips. To
become a JDC member, go to:
http://java.sun.com/jdc/
To subscribe to the Tech Tips and other JDC Email, select
"Subscribe to free JDC newsletters" on the JDC front page.

- ARCHIVES
You'll find the JDC Tech Tips archives at:
http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/TechTips/index.html

- COPYRIGHT
Copyright 2000 Sun Microsystems, Inc. All rights reserved.
901 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto, California 94303 USA.
This document is protected by copyright. For more information, see:
http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/copyright.html

This issue of the JDC Tech Tips is written by Glen McCluskey.
JDC Tech Tips
August 15, 2000

"JavaRanch, where the deer and the Certified play" - David O'Meara
sumankumar
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 13, 2000
Posts: 3
Hi Ajit,
I appreciate your policy for proper names but wait a minute didn't you ever heard the name sumankumar in this whole world!!! if you didn't thats me!![not in -ve sense dont give a messing reply] if you have any policies show it in your registration software where it rejects improper names I guess there is nothing like that!
madhavi naga
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 17, 2000
Posts: 1
Thanks to anil for his service to people like us. I hope there are couple of others like him which makes life easier for aspirants.
shailesh sonavadekar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 1874
Sumankumar , regarding the naming policy. If you have seen the naming policy , it clearly says that The user have to register with proper first & last name ( example. : shailesh sonavadekar )
Yourself , Sukumar , Harpalsingh have registered with first name only. You must be having surname. So , I request all three of you with proper last name & help maintain the decorum of the forum & make the experience of participation in the forum more richer.
YOUR FRIENDLY BARTENDER
SHAILESH
sumankumar
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 13, 2000
Posts: 3
hi shailesh,
I really appreciate it but why dont you consider making the last name field a must during the registration itself. Iam sure that u can make that simple conditional software. Its a matter of making that field compulsary other dont accept it.its very simple whatever u are talking abt show it in your software.
bye.
suman bingi
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 19, 2000
Posts: 21
Hi all,
I found something new at this page thanks all.
Ray Hsieh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 20, 2000
Posts: 59
Hi sumankumar,
Well, if you really appreciate it why don't you take 1-2 minutes of your time to edit/enter your last name while waiting for the good guys here to add the check to the registration page?
JavaRanch is such a good and useful and above all, FREE site, I've learned a lot about Java from it. It's only fair that you go by their simple and reasonable rule of having you register with a proper name.
It's about your attitude and good will, not about whether the registration page checks for your last name or not. The question is: do you have the good will?
Cheers,
Ray.
Originally posted by sumankumar:
hi shailesh,
I really appreciate it but why dont you consider making the last name field a must during the registration itself. Iam sure that u can make that simple conditional software. Its a matter of making that field compulsary other dont accept it.its very simple whatever u are talking abt show it in your software.
bye.
shailesh sonavadekar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 1874
Sumankumar, see there are lot many things sofware can do a lot many things. Other point , I would like to stress here is that Javaranch is very popular site & it is really helping java cerfication enthusiasts all round the world. You will agree with me on that point. So, it is the responsibilty of each & every individual to properly fill the registeration & give proper fisrt & last name , rather than software doing this job. It is really , really required from An Individual , since he or she is going to gain a lot from participation in various forums.See the registration is also very small. You don't have to fill huge fors . Just few details. So , individuals should honestly give the information . Since , you are participating & gaining , there is no point in having psuedonames , annonymous names or not giving e-mail addresses.
So , I request you to reregister yourself with proper last name. Let us allow software to do its job. Let us as individuals will fulfill our duties by properly registering. I will really appriciate help from you to help other who have registered without proper last name & help make javaranch better place.
Ray Hsieh , it was nice to hear from you regarding javaranch. Javaranch will appericate such help from all the responsible javaranchers to help others with proper name registration problems. Thank you very much.
Bye & regards, Sumnakumar , I will appericiate your next message with proper first & last name. ( Sukumar & Harpalsingh , do the needful. )

YOUR FRIENDLY BARTENDER
SHAILESH
Ray Hsieh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 20, 2000
Posts: 59
You're most welcome, shailesh Like I said, Java Ranch has been very useful for me--and I believe to thousands of other members as well.
For such a small request as requiring one to register with proper name in return... I find it difficult to understand that some people actually get offended, simply disappear, or worse, blame your software instead! Gosh!
Originally posted by shailesh sonavadekar:

Ray Hsieh , it was nice to hear from you regarding javaranch. Javaranch will appericate such help from all the responsible javaranchers to help others with proper name registration problems. Thank you very much.
Ajith Kallambella
Sheriff

Joined: Mar 17, 2000
Posts: 5782
sumankumar,
When someone refuses to change their name to comply with JavaRanch policies, this is what I tell them - Consider what you are losing by leaving JavaRanch. Is the naming issue big enough to let go the benefits of being here??
The decision is yours, though I urge you to think in an objective way.
Ajith
akram khan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 21, 2000
Posts: 5
What a nice way to start my post I want to thank all those who are helping scjp aspirants.
akram khan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 21, 2000
Posts: 5
pl anyone tell me how to receive these posts thru mails?
akram khan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 21, 2000
Posts: 5
pl anyone explain me of how to receive these posts thru mails
iam new to this system
akram khan
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 21, 2000
Posts: 5
Hi Ajit this is my 3rd post reg the above . please help me.
Shubhangi A. Patkar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 20, 2000
Posts: 78
Akram,
Go to Javaranch Moose Saloon main page. Arounf the top of this page you will find a link called "Subcribe to a digest". Click on it, u will be taken to the required page.
for ur convenience, I have pasted it here: http://www.javaranch.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ubbmail.cgi?action=subscribe
HTH,
Shubhangi
Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 29, 2000
Posts: 8521
If you subscribe to JDCTechTips it will come to your e-mail address (see post above).
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: Is there any newsletter for scjp?