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installing things trough JWS

 
Kino Lobo
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hello!

Well, I'm pretty rookie about JWS, I've read some articles on the net, but I'd like some help, you know something more straigh foward...

The question is, can I use the JWS tecnology to install a driver in the client machines?

thanks!
 
Jared Cope
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Hi,

At the most basic level, JWS is used to kick off a Java program simply by clicking a hyperlink in a webpage. All the neccessay application files and resources are copied to the client machine in the process of starting up.

So if your program could install the driver, then in theory, yes JWS can help you out.

Cheers, Jared.
 
Peer Reynders
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Originally posted by Jared Cope:
JWS is used to kick off a Java program simply by clicking a hyperlink in a webpage.


As far as I understand it, it's not quite that simple.
  • If the JAR is unsigned its basically restricted to a secure sandbox
  • There is a secure API that lets you import and export files from the local disk under the users control (i.e. Open/Save dialogs popping up all the time.)
  • To obtain unrestricted access the JAR will have to be signed with a digital certificate from a Certifying Authority.
  • Even once the Java app has gotten passed all these hurdles, you still have to contend with the security model of the underlying platform. For Example, on a Windows Box the user must belong to a group that has the necessary privileges to install hardware drivers (typically the Administrators group - though you could tailor a special group towards the requirements of the application).

  • How secure is Java Web Start?
    [ October 02, 2006: Message edited by: Peer Reynders ]
     
    Jared Cope
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    Hi,


    As far as I understand it, it's not quite that simple.


    Sure, you do have to do a few things around the edges, but I can see JWS working for this task which was the original question.


    If the JAR is unsigned its basically restricted to a secure sandbox


    Yes. You have to sign your jar files. But the certificate does not have to be issued from a certifying authority. If JWS doesn't recognize the authority, the user is prompted to accept the risk. Our webstart application is used internally, so there is no need to have a publicly trusted certificate. Depends on your needs.


    you still have to contend with the security model of the underlying platform. For Example, on a Windows Box the user must belong to a group that has the necessary privileges


    Yes. But this is the case regardless of the technology used. JWS or something else. If a locked down user clicks on the webpage webstart link, then the driver will most probably not be installed because of the security permissions you mentioned.

    Cheers, Jared.
     
    Cameron Wallace McKenzie
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    Here's some info about JWS from Sun:

    http://java.sun.com/products/javawebstart/

    -Cameron
     
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