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Why JWS is not popular?

Elizabeth King
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Joined: Jul 11, 2002
Posts: 191
Java Swing has much richer functions than Flex and AJAX. Why do people choose them over Java Swing with JWS? Size of the jar files to be downloaded on client computers? Multiple versions of JVM? Old technology?
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Joined: Jan 10, 2002
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  66

Originally posted by Elizabeth King:
Java Swing has much richer functions than Flex and AJAX.
As was pointed out in your other thread on this topic, that's a loaded statement that is true only if what Swing provides is what you are after. If you need a web application, Swing has zero functionality.

Why do people choose them over Java Swing with JWS? Size of the jar files to be downloaded on client computers? Multiple versions of JVM? Old technology?
Many reasons, including what you have listed. Can you always assume that your client has a JVM at all? And one that's up-to-date? Is your client comfortable with downloading and running your software on their systems? Do you really want to have the headache of supporting multiple copies of your app on the target systems (versus the ease of maintaining a single web application?) And so on.

As I said in the other post, it depends on the needs and the requirements of the particular job. There is no one-size-fits-all solution.

P.S. As you have chosen to move the discussion here, I have closed your other topic on this subject.
[ August 11, 2008: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]

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Elizabeth King
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Joined: Jul 11, 2002
Posts: 191
Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
Many reasons, including what you have listed. Can you always assume that your client has a JVM at all? And one that's up-to-date? Is your client comfortable with downloading and running your software on their systems? Do you really want to have the headache of supporting multiple copies of your app on the target systems (versus the ease of maintaining a single web application?) And so on.

As I said in the other post, it depends on the needs and the requirements of the particular job. There is no one-size-fits-all solution.

P.S. As you have chosen to move the discussion here, I have closed your other topic on this subject.

[ August 11, 2008: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]


Flex is also running in a VM.

When you got a browser, you got a JVM. Plus, you can use a different JVM to run your Swing app
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
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Yes, but none of that affects the reasons that a Swing app might not be the right tool. I say "might" because you seem to be wanting someone to say "Xyz technology is always better than the others". Well, it doesn't work that way. You need to consider what the project requirements dictate, and what the needs, and level of comfort, the client(s) have.
Ulf Dittmer
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Joined: Mar 22, 2005
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When you got a browser, you got a JVM.

No. Browsers no longer ship with JVMs. JVM penetration doesn't come close to Flash VM penetration. Plus, Flash starts up way faster than the JVM, and people dislike browsers locking up for up to 10 seconds while the JVM starts up.

Plus, you can use a different JVM to run your Swing app

I'm not sure if you're responding to something Bear said with this, but in my experience it's beyond the non-technical user to set more than one JVM on a machine, and to make sure they get used for different purposes. But then, I'm not sure how this would make using JWS and/or applets more or less palatable to begin with ... ?


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Elizabeth King
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Joined: Jul 11, 2002
Posts: 191
Originally posted by Ulf Dittmer:

I'm not sure if you're responding to something Bear said with this, but in my experience it's beyond the non-technical user to set more than one JVM on a machine, and to make sure they get used for different purposes. But then, I'm not sure how this would make using JWS and/or applets more or less palatable to begin with ... ?


I agree that JVM is much heavier than Flex VM and this is why its UI functions are much richer. Especially, Java3D.

I think JNLP allow you to use the JVM just for your Swing app, but not affect others running on the same computer.
Yves Zoundi
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Joined: Aug 31, 2008
Posts: 47
JWS "IS" used a lot. Most people that I know who are doing some Swing development use JWS often or at least time to time.

Are you asking the question because you don't see many JWS related articles?


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