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Handwriten JSF tags vs Visual designers

Zhaidarbek Ayazbayev
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 18, 2007
Posts: 6
Hi, Gurus!
I am new to JSF programming and don't know how start. I am reading Core JSF, 2 edition and trying to make something in Netbeans 6 Visual web pack. But using visual designer is compeletely different because it uses woodstock components and generates completely different jsf tags.
What do you prefer in production projects when developing with JSF, handwriting JSF tags or using visual designers such as one in Netbeans 6.0?
Eugene Abarquez
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 211
I've always written mine by hand. I've never used a visual designer that automatically generates the tags for you. If you're new to JSF, I think that it is advisable to write everything by hand so you get familiar with how things work out. So if the visual designer later on generates something that you feel is out of whack, you can always edit it by hand. I guess people use visual designers for the simple reason that it's much faster, you just drag and drop the components and that's it. But with that you also give up control, which leaves you at the mercy of the tool.


There's so much to learn in this industry, and not everybody has the necessary interest.
Freddy Wong
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 11, 2006
Posts: 959


it uses woodstock components and generates completely different jsf tags.

Actually Visual JSF in NetBeans also has standard JSF components. But if you're new to JSF, it's better if you code it by hand first. At least you need to know how the JSF framework works. Once you get well versed in it, you can use Visual JSF.

Just my 2 cents.


SCJP 5.0, SCWCD 1.4, SCBCD 1.3, SCDJWS 1.4
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Zhaidarbek Ayazbayev
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 18, 2007
Posts: 6
Originally posted by Freddy Wong:

Actually Visual JSF in NetBeans also has standard JSF components. But if you're new to JSF, it's better if you code it by hand first. At least you need to know how the JSF framework works. Once you get well versed in it, you can use Visual JSF.

Just my 2 cents.


But there is another problem with any Java IDE visual designer regarding html authoring. The problem is that java developer is bad at design and designer is bad at programming. Designer works with DreamWeaver and prepares markup for user interface, and programmer writes business logic in his favourite IDE.
Could anyone suggest me a programming style or framework/tool for Dreamweaver friendly JSF developement?
Thanks in advance.
Freddy Wong
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 11, 2006
Posts: 959

As far as I know there is a commercial JSF plugin for Dreamweaver.
http://www.jsftoolbox.com/
I don't know if there is any free one available out there.

I'm not a front-end developer and I'm quite bad at designing a web page. But I know CSS and HTML. So I normally do most of the design stuff in the CSS and just apply it to my HTML page. I don't know if it works for you, but that's why I normally do.
Eugene Abarquez
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 18, 2006
Posts: 211
Originally posted by Freddy Wong:
As far as I know there is a commercial JSF plugin for Dreamweaver.
http://www.jsftoolbox.com/
I don't know if there is any free one available out there.


Hmmmm ... interesting link. But judging from the demo it looks like the designer still have to learn the JSF tags. Zhaidarbek, if you want your code to be designer friendly, try using Facelets instead. It lets you write your JSF pages using plain HTML, so you won't have to go through the trouble of translating HTML tags to JSF tags or vice-versa. You can also view the JSF pages in any visual tool like Dreamweaver as if it's a normal HTML file. But of course, you have to write everything by hand.

Check out their developer documentation:
https://facelets.dev.java.net/nonav/docs/dev/docbook.html#taglib-use
[ September 20, 2007: Message edited by: Eugene Abarquez ]
Vassili Vladimir
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 08, 2007
Posts: 1585
Hi,

Use the Oracle JDeveloper IDE, it generates standard code when you drag and drop.

Best of luck ...


Vassili ...
SCJP 5.0, SCWCD 1.4, SCJA 1.0
Daniel Sagenschneider
Greenhorn

Joined: May 14, 2011
Posts: 1
Try out:

webfloor.org

as it provides support for integrating Java web development with WYSIWYG web designer tools such as DreamWeaver by using only three simple instrumentations ( <!-- {section} --> , ${property} , #{link} ) within the web pages. As these do not change the nature of the HTML, it does not intrude on designing or changing web pages with DreamWeaver.

The tutorials off the above link are a great place to start.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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