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Author

Hibernate Made Easy

John Richard Kelly
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 01, 2008
Posts: 7
Hi Cameron,
Welcome to the Java Ranch and congratulations on the book! I just have a couple of questions regarding your book;

1) What level of user is the book most suitable to? Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced? I am a relative newcomer to Hibernate, but I am looking for a very accessible text to get me up to speed on the intricacies of Hibernate.

2) Would you consider the writing style of your book to be formal/informal? I always prefer an informal approach to technical books - eg. the Head First approach. For me, reading a formal technical tome is akin to having your teeth pulled out - painful! Hopefully your book will not be like that!

3) Does your book cover how Hibernate is used in different frameworks (eg. Spring, etc).

4) Are there a lot of practical examples with real-world relevance contained in the book?

5) Finally, what is the cost of your book?

Thanks for taking the time, and good luck with your book launch. I hope it is a success for you!

Regards,
John


Best Regards, <br />John<br /> <br />SCJP 1.4(2005), SCWCD 1.5(in training!)
Vikas Kapoor
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 16, 2007
Posts: 1374
Hello Cameron,

I would repeat John's question no.3. Does your book concentrate solely on Hibernate? Does it explain hibernate in context with Spring/Struts ? Because generally people use these frameworks as they support hibernate.

Thanks.
Best luck for your book.
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
author and cow tipper
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Aug 26, 2006
Posts: 4968
    
    1

1) What level of user is the book most suitable to?


The book is focuessed towards people who are new to Hibernate, but have some basics in Java and know a little bit about a database. Data persistence is itself an advanced topic, so this is definitely not a book for someone who has never programmed in Java. But it is written for the Java professional who knows very little about relational mapping, and has no previous experience with Hibernate or mapping technologies. From that perspective, the book is focussed towards beginner to intermediate Hibernate developers.

2) Would you consider the writing style of your book to be formal/informal?


I have a very informal style. It's been compared to Head First at times, but I have great respect for the Head First series, and am flattered by the comparison. Some have said I am less 'silly' than Head First, and a tad more sarcastic. (By the way, 'silly' isn't a dig at the Head First Books. I like and appreciate their silliness. If you've read them, I think you know what I mean. I just can't think of a better word.) I self publish, so many of the comments I make that would get pulled by editors of other books manage to make it into my final editions.

Follow my signature links, and you'll see some unedited chapters from the book. That'll give you a very good feeling for my writing style.


3) Does your book cover how Hibernate is used in different frameworks (eg. Spring, etc).


I very intentionally stayed away from things like Spring and Seam. From what I've seen, too many books try to cover everything, and in the end, don't cover anything well. Covering too much also tends to intimidate and confuse the reader. The goal from the beginning was to create a very easy to read book about Hiberante that will get people up and running with the technology quickly, so Hibernate with JPA annotations is very much the focus.

Having said that, I've used Hibernate with Spring in many projects. If you have a good understanding of how hibernate works, integrating Hiberante with JSF or Struts or Seam or GWT or Spring is pretty easy. Most problems happen when people don't really understand what Hibernate does, and how it does it. My book really gives you that strong, solid foundation in how to use Hiberante effectively, and once you understand that, you'll find integrating it with Spring or JSF or Seam becomes much, much easier. And, when problems do arise, if you really understand how Hibernate works, you'll be able to solve those problems in a hurry.


Are there a lot of practical examples with real-world relevance contained in the book?


Each chapter contains a single, easily reproducible example that you can get running with nothing more than a database, JDK and the Hibernate libraries. You don't need Maven, ANT or anything else that might complicate things. Plus, the examples don't hinge on previous chapters having been read, and the code from previous chapters having been written. Each chapter is pretty much stand alone, so you can open to any chapter in the book and start coding along. Personally, that's the way I think books like this should be written.

Having said that, I always tell students that the Caveat Emptor is a great, full blown application to reference when heading into production. I'm not sure if it's the greatest learning tool, but it is a great reference, and along with the many examples in my book, you'll be very prepared to start hacking out some powerfule Hibernate code.


Finally, what is the cost of your book?]5) Finally, what is the cost of your book?


It's $54.98, but I'm selling it through amazon at $45.98. I self publish, so my costs are a little higher than the big publishers, so my books sometimes cost a tad more.

For this month, I did notice that Hibernate offers a 5% discount on both Java Persistence with Hibernate and my book, Hibernate Made Easy, if you buy them both together. That's not a bad deal.

Kindest regards,

-Cameron McKenzie
[ June 03, 2008: Message edited by: Cameron Wallace McKenzie ]
John Richard Kelly
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 01, 2008
Posts: 7
Cheers Cameron, sounds like a good deal. Definitely a candidate for the type of book I was looking for. It would be swee-eet to win a copy!

Thanks for taking the time out to answer my questions, and again good luck with the book!

Regards,

John
raghu dubey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 05, 2007
Posts: 72
Thanks Cameron for answering these. And John for asking...

Best of luck for your book. I think it is time for me to get a copy (if I do not win )

A lot of things cleared on one shot.


Thanks,<br />Raghu.<br /> <br />SCJP 5, SCWCD 1.4, NCFM
Vikas Kapoor
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 16, 2007
Posts: 1374
Thanks Cameron
Padmarag Lokhande
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 29, 2008
Posts: 93
Hi,
With EJB3 and JPA very much in focus now, how would your book help someone to understand JPA and EJB3?
What do you think is the future of ORM in general?


- Padmarag Lokhande
SCJP5 - http://blog.padmarag.com
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
author and cow tipper
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Aug 26, 2006
Posts: 4968
    
    1

I wouldn't tell someone trying to learn EJB3 to use Hibernate Made Easy as their learning tool. I'd tell them to buy the book, because I'd want the royalties, of course, but it really doesn't deal with EJB3 at all.

Many authors that post in this forum have written excellent books on EJB3 and JPA. Take a look at Mike Kieth's Pro EJB3 Book. It comes highly recommended.

Pro EJB3 at Amazon.com

-Cameron McKenzie
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
 
subject: Hibernate Made Easy
 
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