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Web services and J2EE

preeti khane
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Joined: Mar 12, 2003
Posts: 93
I would like to know the role Web Services play in the big picture of J2EE... How do they tie into or complement EJB design... EJB's themselves have a huge overhead for implementation and are not recommended for simple applications which do not have immense business logic.. Do Web services just act as a messaging communication medium to EJB's... If so how do Web Services complement JMS architecture,, which is what is currently used for messaging.. Do Web Services remove the need for JMS completely...
I am also trying to understand the need for web services / SOAP , as building blocks for J2EE, adding new paradigms / to existing J2EE architecture...How do they really help real -life J2EE architecture systems... I do know that XML exchange via web services makes it an easy communication service..
Also what I have seen so far about SOAP , it not an easy to implement / master type of protocol... Will building of web services be made easier with some sort of Web Services Application Server , so the application developer need not be concerned with the actual binding/ registering of the Web Services...
thank you for all your replies
William Brogden
Author and all-around good cowpoke
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Joined: Mar 22, 2000
Posts: 12835
    
    5
1. You certainly dont need the full-bore J2EE API to do web services (although Vendors would love to sell you that idea.)
2. I see web services as an ideal user of JMS functions and a great way to expand JMS capability, NOT a replacement.
3. There are lots of great tools to conceal the details of SOAP (which, lets face it, are picky picky picky) and let the designer concentrate on web service architecture.
Bill
Ramesh Nagappan
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Joined: May 06, 2003
Posts: 159
Originally posted by preeti khane:
I would like to know the role Web Services play in the big picture of J2EE... How do they tie into or complement EJB design... EJB's themselves have a huge overhead for implementation and are not recommended for simple applications which do not have immense business logic.. Do Web services just act as a messaging communication medium to EJB's... If so how do Web Services complement JMS architecture,, which is what is currently used for messaging.. Do Web Services remove the need for JMS completely...
I am also trying to understand the need for web services / SOAP , as building blocks for J2EE, adding new paradigms / to existing J2EE architecture...How do they really help real -life J2EE architecture systems... I do know that XML exchange via web services makes it an easy communication service..
Also what I have seen so far about SOAP , it not an easy to implement / master type of protocol... Will building of web services be made easier with some sort of Web Services Application Server , so the application developer need not be concerned with the actual binding/ registering of the Web Services...
thank you for all your replies

The upcoming J2EE 1.4 release (June, 03) focusses primarily on Web services, especially making J2EE application components to participate in Web services. J2EE 1.4 also support WS-I Basic Profile 1.0 (Recommended by Web Services Interoperability Oragnization (ws-i.org). This enables Web services exposed by J2EE 1.4 compliant Application server interoperate with all WS-I Basic Profile compliant Web services.
In particular, All Stateless EJBs can participate Web services using a SOAP Endpoint. The SOAP Endpoint and it service name will be set in the EJB deployment descriptor. All other components can be encapsulated as Web services using JAX-RPC or SAAJ. Both JAX-RPC and SAAJ implementation required are required as part of J2EE 1.4.
For asynchronous communication, MessageDrivenBeans in J2EE 1.4 can receive SOAP messages similiar to JMS messages. It means MessageDrivenBeans can implement "RequestResponseListener" or "OneWayListener" which allows to receive SOAP Messages asynchronously.
If you are really serious about choosing J2EE based Web services, then you must consider using Application servers which implement JAX APIs like JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR and JAXM. Currently very few J2EE 1.3 Application servers support these APIs. One of my favorite application server (which support JAX APIs) is SunONE Application Server 7.0. The PLatform Edition is free to download, development and production. Take a look at http://wwws.sun.com/software/products/appsrvr/appsrvr_download.html.


Ramesh Nagappan CISSP<br />Co-Author of "Core Security Patterns"<br />nramesh@post.harvard.edu<br /><a href="http://www.coresecuritypatterns.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.coresecuritypatterns.com</a>
Kyle Brown
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Joined: Aug 10, 2001
Posts: 3892
    
    5
Might I point out that WebSphere Application Server Version 5.0 ALSO supports JAX-RPC and SAAJ as well as the proposed JSR-109 Web Services deployment specification AND the WS-Security specification as well!
Kyle


Kyle Brown, Author of Persistence in the Enterprise and Enterprise Java Programming with IBM Websphere, 2nd Edition
See my homepage at http://www.kyle-brown.com/ for other WebSphere information.
 
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