aspose file tools*
The moose likes Web Services and the fly likes Best book to learn Web services Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Java » Web Services
Bookmark "Best book to learn Web services" Watch "Best book to learn Web services" New topic
Author

Best book to learn Web services

Mike Anna
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 08, 2007
Posts: 117
Dear all,

I did a lot of google( it just returned a cookbook on Soa and its best practises) and searched this forum too(which resulted in an unanswerwed forum another for weblogic ws (?) and another one for RESTful web services).
I pretty much want to learn web services. I got the "Sams teach yourself ws in 24 hours". Its an okaish book. I would want to understand this entire show of web services in a pretty laymans language (in respect to ws, atleast).

I would love if some one can suggest ONE good book for learning Web services. Or atleast point to a blog or something that would help me understanding.

Rgds
Reza Ravasizadeh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 08, 2004
Posts: 177
First chapters of this book:
Service-Oriented Architecture: A Field Guide to Integrating XML and Web Services (The Prentice Hall Service-Oriented Computing Series from Thomas Erl)


Reza
Mike Anna
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 08, 2007
Posts: 117
Hi,

Thanks for the info. I start reading it tomorow
Please do let me know of any other books also

Rgds
Peer Reynders
Bartender

Joined: Aug 19, 2005
Posts: 2922
    
    5
I actually prefer Thomas Erl's second book Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA): Concepts, Technology, and Design (amazon US) which seems much more structured.

You can find sample chapters for the first book here
You can find sample chapters for the second book here

His third book SOA Principles of Service Design (amazon US) is also interesting (sample chapters).
A fourth book SOA Design Patterns may be published sometime next year.

However these books are completely in the messaging paradigm (which is good) and all about SOAP, WSDL, and WS-* standards. NO IMPLEMENTATION, no Java, no .NET, etc.

If you are looking for a "simpler" style of web services then go for RESTful Web Services (amazon US; concepts are explained, most examples are in Ruby but there is also a Restlet example). Currently the disadvantage for RESTful web services is that there are no wizards in the current generation of IDEs that will crank them out for you, so there is more hand-coding. However the advantage of the SOAP-based web services is usually short-lived. You'll probably have to deal with the raw complexity of the WS-* standards the first time your wizards croak or when you a trying to use (possibly multiple) WS-* standards in your web service interface.

RMH: WS* vs. REST / Intelligence vs. Wisdom
REST vs. WS-*: A Parable
How I Explained REST to My Wife

If you are interested in implementing web services with JAX-WS (Glassfish; Java EE 5):
SOA Using Java� Web Services (amazon US)
Am I Stupid or is Java Web Services Really Hard?

If you are interested in implementing J2EE 1.4 web services (JAX-RPC etc.):
J2EE Web Services (RMH; Richard Monson-Haefel) (amazon US)


Originally posted by Mike Anna:
I would want to understand this entire show of web services in a pretty laymans language (in respect to ws, atleast).
I would love if some one can suggest ONE good book for learning Web services.


No can do. To talk about web services properly you need learn about the messaging paradigm that the web service client and web service server use to communicate. Once you learn that, you still have to learn about framework and APIs that you are going to use to implement the web service (and possibly clients). Because the enterprisey SOAP/WSDL/WS-* standards got so complicated, RESTful web services started to appear (talk about them started back in 2002, SOAP dates back to 2000 and earlier). There are too many aspects to web services to cover "the entire show of web services" in one single volume - unless you are simply looking for an executive summary. So it is going to take more that one or two books to "understand the entire show of web services" - despite the fact that vendors offer some features in the implementation language (be it .NET web service attributes or JAX-WS web service annotations) to �ease development�. Many of them try to ignore the object-hierarchical impedance mismatch (Java Objects vs. XML message payloads) - pretending to be web service magic pixie dust.
Mike Anna
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 08, 2007
Posts: 117
hi Peer Reynders,

Thanks for your reply. I will try and follow the books articles you have suggested. At this stage looks like they should suffice for a lot of time
sasank ch
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 07, 2007
Posts: 25
Personally i think you should install any IDE which supports webservices , example install eclipse , create a dynamic project and add webservice and on another machine create webservice client and call them (first example just pass the string "Hello World"). That is the best way to start learning. All the best
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42950
    
  71
Originally posted by sasank ch:
Personally i think you should install any IDE which supports webservices , ... That is the best way to start learning.


I disagree. Putting a GUI on top of WSes hides most of the details, thus minimizing the amount of knowledge acquired in the process. It may speed up the development of WS, but not the learning.
Asif shivapur
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 18, 2007
Posts: 6
Hi,
Read this book "Developing Java Web services" by Ramesh Nagappan, Wiley publisher.It cost about Rs.449. I am using this book.All chapters nicely described.

Thanks & Regards,
Asif
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: Best book to learn Web services