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compare different open source Web Service framework/ tools

Balachandran Vijayarajan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 23, 2005
Posts: 29
I want to write web service client, we are having lots of web service in this project. Currently we are trying to compare Axis2 and WSIF (Web service integration framework). Any one already compared both of this or can we consider any other framework/tools for this requirement. Thanks a lot in advance

Cheers,

Bala
Peer Reynders
Bartender

Joined: Aug 19, 2005
Posts: 2922
    
    5
Are you aware that Apache WSIF hasn't been updated since 2003?

Should WSIF(last release 2003) be used for web service invocation?

The Axis2 architecture wasn't even introduced until August 2004.
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42264
    
  64
Other options you could look at would the Metro stack and Apache CXF. Both implement the same type of web services Axis2 does, namely SOAP, WSDL, WS-Security etc. using SAAJ, JAX-WS, JAXB etc.

For a lighter-weight approach check out REST, about which Peer has collected many useful links in the http://faq.javaranch.com/java/WebServicesFaq.
[ April 05, 2008: Message edited by: Ulf Dittmer ]

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Balachandran Vijayarajan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 23, 2005
Posts: 29
Thanks, Then you are trying to say better to use Axis2 instead of WSIF. Better can I have comparsion of different tools or framework available. Like SOAP protocal means Axis2 is better, JMS means?

Cheers,
Bala
Ulf Dittmer
Marshal

Joined: Mar 22, 2005
Posts: 42264
    
  64
Then you are trying to say better to use Axis2 instead of WSIF.

I think Peer is saying that it's better in the sense that WSIF is obsolete, and shouldn't be considered at all.
Like SOAP protocal means Axis2 is better, JMS means?

OK, I think you're still a bit confused about the basics of WS. You should probably learn about the underlying concepts and technologies (starting with SOAP, WSDL and REST) before selecting a framework for implementing them.

SOAP is a protocol; it is implemented by several of the frameworks mentioned above (Axis2, CXF, Metro).

JMS is short for Java Messaging Service, and is an API for accessing messaging servers (like MQ series). Although SOAP can be used over messaging services, it is a rare thing to do. I'd suggest that you disregard the use of JMS until you know a good deal more about WS in general (and possibly even thereafter).
Peer Reynders
Bartender

Joined: Aug 19, 2005
Posts: 2922
    
    5
WSIF is short for Web Services Invocation Framework. The Web Services portion of the name derives from the fact that the framework uses WSDL (Web Services Description Language) extensions to unify the description of services exposed through a variety of technologies, in particular local POJOs, SOAP web services, EJBs, and JCA. The JCA provider was never completed and the SOAP web service providers are Apache SOAP and Apache Axis (1.x) - Apache SOAP is hopelessly outdated and Apache Axis (1.x) is JAX-RPC based (essentially a deprecated technology) and no longer being actively developed. I would also assume that the EJB provider is limited to EJB 2.1. Ultimately WSIF is about invoking these services not implementing them - and it is limited to older technologies with little hope of an update.

The following article compares Axis2 and Apache CXF The ServerSide: Axis, Axis2, and CXF: Surveying the WS Landscape - however you shouldn't discount Metro as the underlying technologies are part of current or future Java EEs (and even Java SEs).

However ultimately you need to assess why you want to use web services at all - they are a great tool when they are applied to the right problem, however they are often applied incorrectly and often used where they are entirely inappropriate.

And once you have determined that you actually need web services you still need to decide on the type of web service (there is no point to paying the complexity cost for features that you do not need) - only then can you start looking for an implementation technology.

Critics Say Web Services Need a REST (PDF; 2004)
REST versus SOAP - the SOAP story
REST versus SOAP - the REST story
Balachandran Vijayarajan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 23, 2005
Posts: 29
Thanks a lot - Peer and Ulf.
 
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