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Is Certification really worth it ?

Java geezer
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 10
The old chestnut I know, but I've been thinking about this one and this article is quite interesting see
http://www.javaskyline.com/topnews.jsp
The latest JDJ has also got something to say bout this.
As for me I dont think being certified makes a good programmer it just helps ....


Whatever you think you can do, begin it !. Boldness has power, magic and genius in it.
ersin eser
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Joined: Feb 22, 2001
Posts: 1072
Good one.
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
It's worth it if you take it seriously and for what it is, that is, an improvement of your knowledge and not a learning from scratch.
My comments on Keith's article:
To be or not to be certified (Java developers journal)
[ March 27, 2003: Message edited by: Valentin Crettaz ]

SCJP 5, SCJD, SCBCD, SCWCD, SCDJWS, IBM XML
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Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
One certification will not prove anything. But if you have a college degree in CS related field, and
you did pretty extensive programming in Java before, this certification can boost your knowledge on Java. I have been programming in Java
for more than 2 years, and I still find this process help me to understand the language much better.
victor

Originally posted by Franklin Nwankwo:
The old chestnut I know, but I've been thinking about this one and this article is quite interesting see
http://www.javaskyline.com/topnews.jsp
The latest JDJ has also got something to say bout this.
As for me I dont think being certified makes a good programmer it just helps ....
JeanLouis Marechaux
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 906
Well, let's stop hypocrisy.
We all know, as Java developers, that the certification is not to improve knowledge.
You are not better than a non-certified if you only added value is to know the API by heart.
If the documentation exists, let's use it and let stop learning dummy definitions.
No, if we take the Cert, it is just to have a better salary, a better job, to be recogniized, to have brighter days.....

So the real question is : Does it work ?
Did someone obtain a better job after the SCPJ ?
Did someone obain a better salary ?
Did someone have a chat with his bos like
You know, Boss, I'm certified now... I guess I deserve a better wage...let's say..30 %...
Then what did he do ?
Laughed ? fired you ? cried ? or gave you some Microsoft stock options....??
That is the real question.


/ JeanLouis<br /><i>"software development has been, is, and will remain fundamentally hard" (Grady Booch)</i><br /> <br />Take a look at <a href="http://www.epfwiki.net/wikis/openup/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Agile OpenUP</a> in the Eclipse community
Junilu Lacar
Bartender

Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 4456
    
    6

Originally posted by Bill Bailey:

So the real question is : Does it work ?

A year ago I was (only) a Borland Certified Delphi Consultant. I sat on the bench for two months poring over RHE and any Java book I could get my hands on. I took the SCJP exam and passed. It took me another month of schmoozing with account managers to get an interview. The client almost cancelled my interview when he realized I had no actual Java experience (even though I had more than 3 years of OOP with Delphi and more than 10 years in IT). Fortunately, the account manager made him an offer he couldn't refuse: a 30% discount on the billing rate. I still had to do a good interview though. Apparently, I did well enough because after a couple weeks, I got a call from my excited account manager telling me to report for my first Java assignment.
What I got for my trouble: my foot in the door (I should have pulled it out while I had the chance, but that's another story)
Did I get a raise because of it? I don't know but I'm sure it didn't hurt my review.
Did I get promoted because of it? Heck, no. I still had to prove that I wasn't JACH (Just Another Certified Hacker)
Did it open the door to other opportunities? Heck, yes. I got myself sent to NYC for a 5-day training on EJBs with the MiddleWare company. And my next Java assignment won't be discounted so I can probably use that to bargain for a bigger raise this year. I also learned enough to actually give decent answers at JavaRanch and now I'm leading a study group at my company for SCJP aspirants.
The point is, the SCJP badge is not a magnet for opportunities. It's a sign that you can talk the talk. It's up to you to walk the walk.
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: Junilu Lacar ]

Junilu - [How to Ask Questions] [How to Answer Questions]
Valentin Crettaz
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Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Bill,
I hope your are talking specifically about SCJP and not SCJD.
I agree to some extent that SCJP doesn't prove much. But if you attempt SCJD you better know what you are talking about when you go to the follow-up exam.
Brian Lugo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 10, 2000
Posts: 165
I believe that SCJP is good if you are currently a Java programmer or you are planning to do some JAVA development. Here are couple of reasons:
1. It will help you code faster i.e. resulting in fewer syntax errors and in turn aiding rapid application development.
2. Better understanding of the language structure - so when you are talking with experienced developers you can understand what they are talking, this does not account for the API - memorizing it is a monumental task. But if you are gifted and are able to memorize it then you rule!!
3. Sure, any one can sit with the programming manual(s) and program in any given language. So, the purpose of SCJP is not to test the ability of a person to program in JAVA or not. It tests a person's ability to program effectively in JAVA.
SCJP is all about programming i.e. how to use a given tool effectively. SCJD is more about designing and the architect is one step above it.
Just my two cents ...
Rob Ross
Bartender

Joined: Jan 07, 2002
Posts: 2205
Originally posted by Bill Bailey:
Well, let's stop hypocrisy.
We all know, as Java developers, that the certification is not to improve knowledge


Well, that's the ONLY reason I'm studying for the SCJP. I already have a job as a java programmer. I've been doing software development professionally for over 10 years now, and java for 2 years. I am studying for the SCJP because I want to increase my understanding of core java concepts. When I pass, I won't be getting a raise. I'll just know I learned a lot.
So if you, or anyone else is getting certified just to increase your salary or marketing potential, hey that's great for you. Just don't say that there aren't many other reasons why people get certified.

Rob


Rob
SCJP 1.4
Valentin Crettaz
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Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Brian,
I wouldn't say that SCJP is about efficient Java programming. Because if you don't know squat about Java and you are good at memorizing things, you can get certified. And that is what we have to fight against. That behavior is exactly the reason why people are asking themselves whether it is worth getting certified (right Franklin?). By certifying people who had no idea of Java two months before their exam, we are banalizing the certification process and decreasing its worth.

Better understanding of the language structure

Lots of people don't even know what the JLS is and I'm sorry to say that the JLS is the absolute reference as far as language structure is concerned.
It tests a person's ability to program effectively in JAVA.

Well, maybe we didn't got the same exam, 'cause I had nothing to code.
Brian, let me get this straight, I'm not fighting what you say, but things need to be said correctly. In my opinion, a certification is good as long as one stays honest with what she is learning. To stay honest means "to respect the technology" and take the time it requires to first getting experienced with it and then getting further. And only if that requirement is applied correctly, the certification value may be increased, otherwise Sun will keep certifying people who ar good at reading and memorizing...
And I can tell from all posts I've read so far that more than half of the people seeking certification are not ready for getting that title because they simply don't fulfill the basic requirement of having steady knowledge in the field. No hard feelings folks!
Everybody repeat after me:
"I first need to get experienced, and then I will seek for certification, not the other way around!"

At least Rob got it right
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: Valentin Crettaz ]
Wendal Park
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 28, 2001
Posts: 39
I agree.
I have been programming in Java for more than 4 years, but I still found the certification path useful since there are lots of topics that I will never touch at work.


MSc, BSc, SCJP 1.4<br /> <img src="graemlins/banghead.gif" border="0" alt="[banghead]" /> SCBCD
Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Hypocrite or not, I am not sure a SCJP will get you far. I mostly agree with Brian's assessment.
Never use SCJP only as a tool to get you something, I personally consider it as a learning process that can fill holes left by my education.
This process proves that several courses on Java in college did not give me a solid ground to understand Java. This is why I am taking time to
learn, not too anxious to take this test. I can tell you that the prep books for SCJP are far better and clearer than any textbooks that I had before. A solid grasp of Java basics surely will speed up your programming.
victor

Originally posted by Bill Bailey:
Well, let's stop hypocrisy.
We all know, as Java developers, that the certification is not to improve knowledge.
You are not better than a non-certified if you only added value is to know the API by heart.
If the documentation exists, let's use it and let stop learning dummy definitions.
No, if we take the Cert, it is just to have a better salary, a better job, to be recogniized, to have brighter days.....

So the real question is : Does it work ?
Did someone obtain a better job after the SCPJ ?
Did someone obain a better salary ?
Did someone have a chat with his bos like
You know, Boss, I'm certified now... I guess I deserve a better wage...let's say..30 %...
Then what did he do ?
Laughed ? fired you ? cried ? or gave you some Microsoft stock options....??
That is the real question.
Brian Lugo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 10, 2000
Posts: 165
Lets start a thread and ask people if they have passed the SCJP solely on memorizing and not understanding the concepts.
I would'nt mind taking that person out for lunch/dinner .
Speaking in terms of SCJP you have to memorize the concepts that you have digested (all the concepts essential to SCJP) to pass the SCJP (may be with a good score).
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Brian,
understanding a concept and using a concept are two diametrically opposed things. If you understand something it doesn't mean that you know how to use it or what else you need to know to use it.
That's exactly the reason why people should first be experienced (that means a least 2 years full-time of Java work) before daring to attempt the certification exam.
If you have no experience and you get certified you are not very valuable to me, but if you are experienced and get certified it's another story.
Anyway, we'll never find ourselves on common ground concerning that question, I guess
Junilu Lacar
Bartender

Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 4456
    
    6

Val and Rob,
I respect your opinions and have no doubt that you have nothing but honorable intentions in taking the SCJP and in keeping the title from becoming just another gold star to stick on a resume.
But let's get back to the real world here: the world where people have to compete with other people in order to survive, where one needs to try to get as much advantage over others as possible in order to come out ahead. Not everybody can spend their days on a mountaintop and soak in the glow of "Pure Java" knowledge.
Surely you realize that you could just as easily gain the core knowledge you seek without studying for the exam. And what of those who are in the Catch-22 situation of not being qualified for a job because of lack of experience but can't get experience because they aren't qualified for a job? They certainly have to break out somehow.
Despite all our good intentions for the SCJP and best efforts to maintain a certain level of professionalism, it is my considered opinion (induced from the type of questions we get in this forum) that most people taking the exam today have practically no concern for the ideals that you so valiantly try to uphold.
But then again, that may be just my own cynical weltanschauung
Rob Ross
Bartender

Joined: Jan 07, 2002
Posts: 2205
Well Junilu, if that's true, it's very sad.
But I can tell you my experience of 10 years is that in that time, NO ONE has ever asked me about any kinds of certifications in any of the various types of platforms I have programmed...including a plethora of Database platforms. It's never come up. Not once in ten years. It was always about my experience.
So if you are getting certified because you think that someone is really going to care about it, and hire you because of it, well, that's NEVER been my experience! Sorry.

Rob
Junilu Lacar
Bartender

Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 4456
    
    6

Originally posted by Rob Ross:
So if you are getting certified because you think that someone is really going to care about it, and hire you because of it, well, that's NEVER been my experience!

Nor has it been mine. Sadly, it seems to me that a lot of folks think otherwise and perhaps to the extent that they do sometimes succeed, the misconception only lives on.
The only thing that the SCJP really got me was noticed. After that, it was all about what I had done in the past and what I could do.
But there's still hope, you know. The SCJD is still there to make sure that we maintain a high level of professionalism.
Junilu
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Junilu,
most people taking the exam today have practically no concern for the ideals that you so valiantly try to uphold.

That's the idea I was trying to convey, but apparently I failed
Rob,
if that's true, it's very sad.

You betcha
Erik Dark
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 28, 2002
Posts: 107
It seems a lot of people here are experienced in IT/Java and now seek certification. That's a perfectly good order to do things I think..
But what if you lack (job-)experience and like to get a foot in the door of IT? Not just to get another payed job but because you found out you are fascinated by the whole thing (Java) and want to get your finger behind it...sincerely!
This little story points out what made me studying for SCJP, realizing though it's not the cleanest way to do it. But maybe it gives me just that foot in the door to gain real experience
What was first: the chicken or the egg?
Erik Dark
Brian Lugo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 10, 2000
Posts: 165
I really see some extremist views here about whats right and whats wrong. Or as a matter of fact what are the implications of doing a certain thing in various ways. Lets see what I mean:
1. A person with 2 or more years of JAVA exp. taking/studying for SCJP.
2. A person with 2 or more years of JAVA exp. taking/studying for SCJP rigorously (like understanding/memorizing JLS and then scoring between 90-100% in SCJP).
3. A person with some programming experience in JAVA taking SCJP.
4. A person with absolutely no technical experience taking SCJP to get a job in JAVA.
5. And may be more that I cannot think of right now.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with above things. Things start going wrong when the person who has passed SCJP does not apply the concepts that he/she has learnt. There is no guarantee that a person in category 1 or 2 will always apply what he/she has learnt.
People have different motives to take SCJP, I think the end result is the person who has passed the SCJP very recently has some knowledge about JAVA and hopefully that person may have learnt something new.
I see couple of posts indicating the perfectionist/extremist tone here.
Anyways, which ever you want to slice it I hope that a person taking SCJP has learnt atleast something. Whether that person will make use of things that he/she has learnt - no one will know.
I know that I am learning a lot of new things and I hope someday I am capable of applying these neat concepts.
Some posts in this thread indicate the passionate feelings they have about JAVA programming, which is really good. But then preaching that what they are doing is the only correct thing that one can do is non-sense.
JeanLouis Marechaux
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 906
Valentin, Rob, Junilu,
Please allow me to clarify my point of view.
I do not take the Cert in order to increase my salary because :
1) I do not take the Cert (good reason, no ? )
2) I don't really care about my salary
But take a look at the Cert forums here and there.
Most of the time, you've got Java newbies or students trying to pass the exam, with 1 to 6 month of relevant experience.
Does it make sense ? I'm quite sure it doesn't.
So I'm with you. Let's create the first Ethical Java Programmer Association together
- Professionalism
- Technical knowledge
- Experience
- Humility
- respect
- Humour

I didn't want to hurt anybody. If I did, please forgive me.
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: Bill Bailey ]
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
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Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
bill,
Does it make sense ? I'm quite sure it doesn't.

There you go...
Brian,
...There is absolutely nothing wrong with above things

Well, that's a matter of interpretation anyway.
There is no guarantee that a person in category 1 or 2 will always apply what he/she has learnt.

Absolutely.
Anyways, which ever you want to slice it I hope that a person taking SCJP has learnt atleast something

Well, that was never the question here, at least I didn't perceived it as the main issue. Of course, you will never know everything, and you'll always learn something.
But then preaching that what they are doing is the only correct thing that one can do is non-sense.

Again, nobody said that (I guess). This is not about "preaching the correct thing to do" but more about common sense. In everything you'll do in your life you'll have to start by learning the basics, won't you? Now the problem is just how much time you spend learning the basics? Is that enough? Or do I need to learn more?
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: Valentin Crettaz ]
Rob Ross
Bartender

Joined: Jan 07, 2002
Posts: 2205
I don't feel hurt at all. Nor do I think my views are extreme.
I know there are a lot of people trying to get into java programming who have no previous experience, and I respect that.
But this particular forum is about the SCJP. And Sun recommends that a person actually have a little hands-on experience actually writing java software before they take the test. Now, this is a suggestion, and people are free to disregard it. But if you do, if you really have no java programming experience, and you just decide one day to take the SCJP by studying for 2 months and memorizing all the answers to every practice test so you memorize enough by route to get a passing score on the test, well, I ask what have you gained?
A piece of paper?
If you try to get a job, and tell them you're certified, but can't even write a simple program and explain how it works, then how will that help get you hired? It will, in fact, make the certification look less useful.
That's all I'm trying to say

Rob
Brian Lugo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 10, 2000
Posts: 165
I quit. Got to do better things than philosophize ...
Bill - lets start the cult. However if I choose to be a member, I am not going to complain/cry about those people who are not doing the same thing that I am/will be doing even though I know it is the correct/good thing and its just a matter of choice.
Corey McGlone
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 20, 2001
Posts: 3271
Somehow, I feel that this thread has strayed a little bit. The original question was: "Is Ceritifcation really worth it?"
Well, if nothing else, this thread has revealed that everyone has their reasons for becoming certified and everyone has their viewpoints of why one should (or should not) become certified.
So, since everyone has their own reasons for becoming certified, I guess each person really has to answer this question for his/herself. If you're after certification in order to get a promotion, well, then, did you get the promotion? If so, then I guess it was worth it. If not, hopefully you learned something from the experience. If you're after certification just to learn more, you're probably in for a winning experience, unless you already know everything there is to know about Java.
I don't think anyone can tell you if certification will be worth it for you because it's up to you to decide why you want to be certified in the beginning. If you achieve what you wanted that led you to becoming certified in the first place, I guess it was worth it.
Now, if what you really want to know is, "Will getting certified get me a job?" or "Will becoming certified make me a good Java programmer?" - those are entirely different questions.
There's my two cents,
Corey
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: Corey McGlone ]

SCJP Tipline, etc.
Rob Ross
Bartender

Joined: Jan 07, 2002
Posts: 2205
Excellently said Corey!
For me, I'd say this process has been worth it, because I have learned so much in preparing for this exam thus far, and I can state this even though I haven't taken it yet!
Rob
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Very good post Corey.
It is indeed true that everyone might have a different reason of getting certified and I respect that.
Let's just conclude by saying that this thread at least confirms one thing: everything, no matter what, is relative.
I'll be back on the subject in about a month
Stephen Batsas
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 22, 2002
Posts: 117
Dear Guys and Gals,
My two cents worth on this topic:
I dont believe that someone who can memorise the API or understands the concepts and principles can pass the exam. There are many questions with code examples that require you to predict the output. This can only be learned by hands on coding experience.
Regards
bill williams
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 15, 2002
Posts: 94
I agree with Rob that the preparing process itself is most worthwhile. I cleared lots of confusion on the basic concepts during the process. I also learned something I did not have much experience with, such as IO and events.
I do believe that, if i stand before an interviewer with another applicant with similar experience and background, and I have an additional java certificate, I would have a better chance to be hired. This alone is worth $150, right?
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: bill williams ]
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: bill williams ]
[ February 05, 2002: Message edited by: bill williams ]

Yet Another SCJP2
aymen esawey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 29, 2002
Posts: 61
this thread made some points clear to me i think i'll head for the beginners forum.


Aymen Esawey<br />SCJP <img src="smile.gif" border="0"> <br /><a href="http://www.javaranch.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic&f=32&t=001968" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">how to nuke the SUN </a>
Joseph Hammerman
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 19, 2002
Posts: 76
Certification is useful both as a credential and for learning. There is a long term value of the credential and a long term value of what you have learned, beyond whether it gets you a job immediately. I think it is important to develop your skills, as well as make yourself look good on paper. Certification probably works best as a credential if you have experience indicating you are a Java guru and several certifications in Java also indicating you are a Java guru. As an experienced contract programmer, getting Java certification will not immediately get me a Java job. It will initially make me eligable for jobs in my main areas of experience where Java is listed as a plus.
JeanLouis Marechaux
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 12, 2001
Posts: 906
Well,
So many people argued the SCPJ is useful that maybe I'll start preparing it...
(Only idiots never change their mind )
[ February 06, 2002: Message edited by: Bill Bailey ]
jbuilder
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 07, 2002
Posts: 1
1.The world needs more Java Programmers and Developers, so, do not hesitate to study Java.
2.
everyone has the steps from a beginner to an
expert. so do not worry you are now a beginner.
3.
The world needs judgement to competition.
some person thought, not being a SCJP is better than being a SCJP, because too many people passed.
so, i will ask, if so many people got SCJP, why
you as an expert not get one?
if it's easy for u to get, why not get??
if it's hard for u to get, why not get??

oracle9i@263.net
Marcus Green
arch rival
Rancher

Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
I have seen reports that Certified programmers earn more than un certified ones. I did have the link on my discussion forum but I cannot find it at the moment (feel free to search).
However it could be that certified programmers are more highly motivated to jump through hoops and thus get on better. Also getting certified certainly can improve your knowledge of Java (if not your ability), but for most people the motivation will be an improvement in resume/prospects.

Certification is just a nice tick on the resume, and a spring in the step for confidence.
Marcus


SCWCD: Online Course, 50,000+ words and 200+ questions
http://www.examulator.com/moodle/course/view.php?id=5&topic=all
Jane Griscti
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 30, 2000
Posts: 3141
Just read a new survey/article on this topic that places all certification in good perspective.
Check it out
Certification: The Year in Review


Jane Griscti
SCJP, Co-author Mike Meyers' Java 2 Certification Passport
R K Singh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 15, 2001
Posts: 5371
Why do you want to get certified?
you have to think... if you want to get it for Job, then it can help only till first screening after that u have to really prove that u are worth. If u can not prove that u are worth in interview or in there first criteria of selection then they might go for a guy who is not certified but proves himself to be worth there invertment.
So do not get certified for Job... it can only help you to take upto water .. you have to drink it by bending and sulping the water. If you think after certification some one will bring water for u in a crystal glass , U R wrong.
I think I wanted to get certi because I wanted to see myself where I am, though true I do not need Sun to say where I am. As I think every one knows what is his level of knowledge.
It is preparation for certi which is worth ... marks are materialistic.


"Thanks to Indian media who has over the period of time swiped out intellectual taste from mass Indian population." - Chetan Parekh
Valentin Crettaz
Gold Digger
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2001
Posts: 7610
Another interesting article (not especially about SCJP but any cert in general):
Key certifications grow in value
Whod Prompt
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 20, 2003
Posts: 10
I graduated in Computer Engineering recently where my college teachs 60% software and 40% hardware for this degree. I had only one class with java, where the class was data structures in C++ and the labs were in java. A lot of people will know only the basics of java, and be able to compile a few programs, but really have only done c++ work will say they know java. After graduating I wanted to work in java, but don't have much knowledge of the langauge. I wish I could get the experience first and then the certification, but I haven't been able to find a job yet. So I just don't want to sit around and not imrove myself, so instead of just programming I decided to be able to put something on my resume. I don't think the certification will get me hired without a bachelors degree, but this certification will indicate that I have a basic knowledge of java. I would like to get the developers certification eventually, but one step at time.
I believe this is a competivie world and not just a bachelors degree and some experience will go far anymore. Everybody I talk to is either getting their masters or have their masters, this wasn't the case 5-10 years ago. Just my 2-cents.
So yes it's worth it for me and I think anybody who wanted to do java development that it might not help that much, but it's not that hard and it won't hurt. It's worth the 150 bucks. But maybe other people will consider getting the developers and architecture along with the programmer
[ March 27, 2003: Message edited by: Whod Prompt ]
Francis Siu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 04, 2003
Posts: 867
Hello
Some people say that know c++ is equal to Java.
It may true that some knowledge are the same but
several concept are different such as the feature of
Garbage Collection which c++ hasn't and the Multiple Inheritance which Java hasn't.
Whod Prompt
All people are very helpful in this JavaRanch and work hard, if you really like to be Java programmer
I think that JavaRanch is ours place to live in.


Francis Siu
SCJP, MCDBA
Gurucharan Murudeshwar
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 19, 2003
Posts: 15
Hi All,
It is a fact that one certification does not
prove anything about the person.
Unless ofcourse, he/she gets 100% !!!
But consider a case in an interview or a pay hike :
(1) Person-A
- Has been in the company for 2 years
- Is good in Java programming
- Knows about the project requirements
- Is a hard worker
- Does not have any Java related certificates
(2) Person-B
- Has been in the company for 2 years
- Is good in Java programming
- Knows about the project requirements
- Is a hard worker
- Has a SCJP certificate
Now, it does matter !
Anyone checking the resumes would prefer Person-B to Person-A.
It is sad but true.

Cheers,
gurucharan
[ Some people learn by example,
Others only through experience.
]
 
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subject: Is Certification really worth it ?