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hashCode Question

 
Mike Cutter
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I saw this question on a mock exam, but I don't always trust their answers. I hear that hashCode questions are big on the certification exam, so a thorough explanation of this question would be helpful.
Given two instances of x and y, of a class that correctly implements equals() and hashCode() methods, which two are always equal? (Choose two)
A. (x.equals(y) == false) implies (x.hashCode(y) != y.hashCode())
B. (x.hashCode(y) != y.hashCode()) implies (x.equals(y) == false)
C. (x.hashCode(y) == y.hashCode()) implies (x.equals(y) == y.equals(x))
D. (x.equals(y) == true) implies (x.hashCode() == y.hashCode())
 
Sudd Ghosh
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The equals/hashcode contract says:
If two objects are equal according to the equals(Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce the same integer result.
It is not required that if two objects are unequal according to the equals(java.lang.Object) method, then calling the hashCode method on each of the two objects must produce distinct integer results. However, the programmer should be aware that producing distinct integer results for unequal objects may improve the performance of hashtables.
Following this, options B and D should be correct.
 
Balloon Boo
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I think D must right!en......Maybe B is right!
This afternoon I'll take the exam!GOD bless me!
 
Dan Chisholm
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Originally posted by Mike Cutter:
A. (x.equals(y) == false) implies (x.hashCode(y) != y.hashCode())
B. (x.hashCode(y) != y.hashCode()) implies (x.equals(y) == false)
C. (x.hashCode(y) == y.hashCode()) implies (x.equals(y) == y.equals(x))
D. (x.equals(y) == true) implies (x.hashCode() == y.hashCode())

The Object.hashCode method does not declare a parameter so the code examples here are problematic.
 
Balloon Boo
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U're right,Dan!
I missed the hashcode() declare!
B is wrong!
 
Sudd Ghosh
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Oh, oh... I too overlooked that. If that hashCode parameter was not there, then option B would have been correct, right ? Is there any other problem with that option?
Thanks, Sudd
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