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Synchronization and Locks

 
Buhi Mume
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From Kathy & Bert Java 5 book, it states that each object has just one lock (page 707). What does this mean?

I am confused because the book continues saying that (page 709)
That gives you the ability to have more than one lock for code synchronization within a single object.


Help? Thank you.
 
Sujittt Tripathyrr
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Hi

I think the meaning is when you have multiple object which are accessing the same shared rsources but if the block is in synchronized then only one object is eligible for access.

Please coorect me if i am wrong.

Thanks
 
Poobhathy Kannan
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It�s like this

Think there is a room with a pad-lock. If you enter that room then u will lock that room so no one else can enter into there. Once you have released only, any other can get in.

The same applies to threads too.
Room is an Object... Pad-lock is the lock� and you and others are threads.
 
Buhi Mume
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The room and padlock analogy explains that an object has one lock. But how about the following?
That gives you the ability to have more than one lock for code synchronization within a single object.
 
Tony Shivpershad
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I agree with Buhi, the statements appear to be contradictory. I am confused as well.
 
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