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(Solved!) Boxing tricks

 
Jem Hobstad
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Hey.

Well, checking all chapters before the friday's exam made me encounter this tricky thing about boxing.

Byte b = 127;
Byte b1 = 127;
b == b1; // this is true

Integer i = 128;
Integer i1 = 128;
i == i1; // this is false, because it's larger than 127. Ok, that's burnt in.

Now. Ha! Look:
Short s = 10;
Short s2 = new Short((short)10);
s == s2; // this is false. Eeek.
s.equals(s2); // this is true >_<

Short s3 = new Short("10");
s2 == s3; // false too. Surprised.

Well, is there any logic explanation to this, or it's just to be accepted as-is and remember it until the exam is done?

thanks.

[ October 24, 2007: Message edited by: Jem Hobstad ]
[ October 24, 2007: Message edited by: Jem Hobstad ]
 
Keith Lynn
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Originally posted by Jem Hobstad:
Hey.

Well, checking all chapters before the friday's exam made me encounter this tricky thing about boxing.

Byte b = 127;
Byte b1 = 127;
b == b1; // this is true

Integer i = 128;
Integer i1 = 128;
i == i1; // this is false, because it's larger than 127. Ok, that's burnt in.

Now. Ha! Look:
Short s = 10;
Short s2 = new Short((short)10);
s == s2; // this is false. Eeek.
s.equals(s2); // this is true >_<

Short s3 = new Short("10");
s2 == s3; // false too. Surprised.

Well, is there any logic explanation to this, or it's just to be accepted as-is and remember it until the exam is done?

thanks.

[ October 24, 2007: Message edited by: Jem Hobstad ]


Yes, there is a logical explanation.

When used between object references, == tests whether or not those references refer to the same object.

The equals method tests the contents of the object.
 
marc weber
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Originally posted by Jem Hobstad:
...this is false, because it's larger than 127. Ok, that's burnt in...

Remember, this behavior of referencing the same wrapper instance for values withing a byte range applies only to boxed instances. Whenever you use "new" to construct a wrapper instance, you are creating a brand new separate instance, regardless of the value.
 
Jem Hobstad
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Ok, but my point is


They hold the same value. They all are instances of Byte, but strangely, only two references point to the same object.
In the book, it states (p236) taht two wrapper objects will always be == when their primitive values are the same:
- Boolean
- Byte
- (..)
- Short and Integer from -128 to 127.
According to that, the == betweeb any of these four Byte instances should return true ...
 
Jem Hobstad
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ah sorry didn't see your post Marc

ok that solves my issue then!
cheers.
 
marc weber
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Originally posted by Jem Hobstad:
... In the book, it states (p236) that two wrapper objects will always be == when...

I don't have the book with me, but I think this is under the topic of autoboxing, and only applies to that context. That is, "two boxed wrapper objects..."

(I know you got it now, but I just want to stress this for anyone else reading this, because there's a good chance it will be on the exam. )
 
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