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Unix on your resume

Alex Ayzin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 10, 2001
Posts: 107
On various job boards you keep seeing requests for Java developers with Unix(Linux, Sun Solaris, etc.). How much Unix you should know for a Java developer? I mean, I know how to put \ls(I think that's the command simular to \dir in DOS) on command line, but that's pretty much it. I remember, then I first started with Sybase, the fuss about Unix was huge, we were forced to learn it(to bad I can't remember non of it), but I didn't actually used it in my Sybase related work at all. Is it the same with Java or you really need it? Can youy just put Sun Solaris on your resume, brush up some tutorials before interview and just go?
Thanks in advance,
Regards,
--Alex
Vladan Radovanovic
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 20, 2000
Posts: 216
I really think so. You have to understand that the world is full of ignorant recruiters. They have a requirement to find individuals with "Sun Solaris" experience. None of them know anything about it and how much of it you should know. There is a book called "Essential System Administration" from O'Riley. Even thuogh the book is for Unix System Administrators, it doesn't hurt if you just browse through it. You will understand that the different versions of Unix ( Linux, Sun Solaris, Irix and so on...) have 95% things in common so if you know one version, you really know all the others. Yes you can really just quickly learn most common commands and that should be good. And if you worry what if you have trouble at workplace with any of the commands, there is Unix based help system called Manual Pages which you invoke by typing man and there is an explanation for any command. I have used Unix for 4 years of my schooling but I don't think I have used more than 10 commands. Make sure you brush up on basic commands and that is it.
My 2 cents.
Vladan
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

Don't try and read a system admin book. It will just confuse you. You only need to learn about 10 commands (as Vladan said) and know how to work with either vi or emacs.


Please ignore post, I have no idea what I am talking about.
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

Go to http://www.google.com and search for "free unix shell accounts". Get a unix account and brush up on your commands.
Good luck.
Alex Ayzin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 10, 2001
Posts: 107
Thanks, guys.
Christopher, does it matter, which free Unix Shell account I get? I mean, there are lots of them on the net, offering different things. What in particular should I look for in that service? One service offer something like this: irc (EPIC4), gcc/cc, perl, ncftp, web page, email account, majordomo (list server), pub ftp. OS: Linux Slackware 3.4, kernel release 2.0.32
And the other service offers the following: Software/service available: ircii, tcl, gcc, ncftp, screen, web page, email, etc.. OS: Linux. Is there any preferences?
One more thing. Can you recommend any site that gives something like a comparison chart of different Unix flavors, I mean
Linux vs. SunOS Solaris vs. AIX vs. anything else.
Thank you,
--Alex
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

I was just suggesting that you get anyone of these accounts so you could practice your basic unix commands. And I am sure that any of them would give you that functionality. If you don't use it you will lose it. Don't worry about all the extra unix utils that some of these accounts have. You want to be able to stay fresh with the basic commands.
If I see any sites that compare different flavors of unix I will post back here.
 
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