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How to change fields?

John Mills
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 25, 2001
Posts: 13
Many of you have suggested that if we cannot find any jobs in Java, then switch to something else, like C++, databases etc. But remember that each area requires serious study, like C++, Oracle, SAP etc. How do you guys find the time and money to take courses in such broad areas. When I am unemployed I would spend most of my time looking for jobs so that I do have the time and money to further study. Please help me. How do you keep on learning? How do you switch so easily to another field?
Thanks a lot.
Michael Finney
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 25, 1999
Posts: 508
This belongs in Jobs Discussion. I am moving it there.
------------------
Michael Finney
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform
Sun Certified Developer for the Java 2 Platform


Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
http://www.smilingsoftwaresolutions.com/
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

In lots of jobs there is the oppertunity to learn new things. So if you are hired to code C++ there will most likely be tasks which require other languages. I have never been able to learn much outside of work. I figure out what I want to learn than find tasks that require that skill. In addition lots of companies will send you to training and or refund costs of real classes.


Please ignore post, I have no idea what I am talking about.
Daniel Dunleavy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 13, 2001
Posts: 276
I have been in the field for 20 years, and in my opinion you can't afford to wait until your out of work to start learning. I am always trying to look ahead and start learning the "new stuff" at home while working on the stuff I already know at work. Over the years I have made transitions from IBM/COBOL/VSAM to DB2. While doing this I was learning PC stuff and having a hard time convincing management I wasn't just a mainframe guy. Finally got the PC job. Then I started learning unix/oracle.
Once again the point is, you must always be looking to the horizon the see the things you have to start learning now. So when you are out of work you are prepared to do either the same old thing or possibly pick up a job in the "new stuff" you have accumulated.
I think I once heard you need to be putting in at least 10-20 hours a week of new stuff to keep standing still.
Dan
John M. Gabriele
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 18, 2001
Posts: 232
I went to college to be a high school physics teacher.
Now, with the market the way it is, I plan to fall back on
teaching if I [gulp] have to.
Guess I'm lucky.
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986

That's not true.

I think I once heard you need to be putting in at least 10-20 hours a week of new stuff to keep standing still.
John Mills
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 25, 2001
Posts: 13
Originally posted by john gabriele:
I went to college to be a high school physics teacher.
Now, with the market the way it is, I plan to fall back on
teaching if I [gulp] have to.
Guess I'm lucky.

Well, I do not even have a teacher certificate. Is it nice to get one, careerwise?
John M. Gabriele
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 18, 2001
Posts: 232
Getting a teaching cert in CT is very difficult. There's
all kinds of tests, forms, classes, and letters of recommendation
involved. You wouldn't want it anyway, unless you were really dedicated to kids -- pay starts usually about $35k/year.
Daniel Dunleavy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 13, 2001
Posts: 276
well? what is your opinion, more or less?
curious
Dan

Originally posted by christopher foran:
That's not true.

I think I once heard you need to be putting in at least 10-20 hours a week of new stuff to keep standing still.

John M. Gabriele
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 18, 2001
Posts: 232

Everybody should spend at *least* 10 hours a week learning new things whether these things are career-related or not.
Michael Pearson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 11, 2001
Posts: 351
Benjamin Franklin believed a man should spend a few hours every day learning new skills. He tried to diversify his skills in the arts and sciences. He thought this daily ritual would allow him to fulfill his maximum potential.
That's old school, but it's still an ideal to strive for. The man was a genius that lived a very full life.

John, it looks like you and Benjamin Franklin have something in common!
William Barnes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 16, 2001
Posts: 986


well? what is your opinion, more or less?

You make a living as a programmer, how many hours a week do you spend learning new things?
You are presenting the 10 to 20 hours a week as if someone else told you a common truth. Which is what I am disagreeing with. Instead why don't you tell us how much time you put in, than I wouldn't have anything to disagree with.
I know that I don't have an extra 10 to 20 hours a week to do anything, let alone learn new things.
Daniel Dunleavy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 13, 2001
Posts: 276
Chris...on avg 10-15 a week, but it can vary. Right now its higher because I am trying to learn java as well as some other things.
Michael...Ben Franklin is my hero !!! he just about did it all...printing, politics/ gov, science, created the free library system in America, as well as his wild off hours exploits.
Dan
 
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