This week's book giveaways are in the Refactoring and Agile forums.
We're giving away four copies each of Re-engineering Legacy Software and Docker in Action and have the authors on-line!
See this thread and this one for details.
Win a copy of Re-engineering Legacy Software this week in the Refactoring forum
or Docker in Action in the Cloud/Virtualization forum!
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HELP: your very first professional programming job

 
Paul Kim
Greenhorn
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hello, I am a newbie of this forum. I am going to get my CS degree in a year or so. I need some sort of guidence since I have no related work experience. My questions are mainly towards C++/java programmers. I am curious what is like to be a junior programmer? What kind of work do you do in the real world? Is it very different from the work you did in the college lab? What is your daily routine for the first 3 months on the job? And thereafter. I know the job market is very bleak for new graduates right now. But I still would like to know which industry has more openings for entry-level c++/java programmers in general. Lastly, is Detroit a good place to find some IT works in the near future? Thank you for your help!!!
 
Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff
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As I recall there was a lot of grunt work at first. After all - what is the advantage of seniority if you can't get the newbie to do the dull stuff for you. Did some documenting, did some security work.
Then it worked it's way up to a series of minor report changes and scheduling duties.
I was excited when they actually let me work on a Change Request that actually DID something :roll: .
Detroit - hmmmmm. Well I work around Detroit - but there have been a heck of a lot of layoffs around here lately. In this area the demand for programmers just about parallels the profits for the Big 3.
Course GM just had a REALLY good quarter - so things may look up soon.
 
Daniel Dunleavy
Ranch Hand
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It depends on the kind of company you join. Some large companies can have you milling around looking for a desk and computer for a few weeks. While a small hungry firm needs everyone productive from day one. I was lucky to start at a smallish software firm where you were doing stuff from day one. The good thing about large companies is training. They can afford the cost and downtime to give it to you.
Good Luck
Dan
 
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