aspose file tools*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes War is over, but where are the jobs? Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "War is over, but where are the jobs?" Watch "War is over, but where are the jobs?" New topic
Author

War is over, but where are the jobs?

Jim Baker
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 10, 2002
Posts: 177
Now war is over, but no turn around on
economy.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61662
    
  67

Who said the war is over?
And you expect the economy to turn around in an afternoon when it's being totally neglected?
bear, waiting for someone in power to notice that the economy needs a bit of attention...


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
Derek Grey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 204
Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
Who said the war is over?
And you expect the economy to turn around in an afternoon when it's being totally neglected?
bear, waiting for someone in power to notice that the economy needs a bit of attention...

Does that "someone in power" actually have any power at all to bring up the economy ???
If yes then what's he/she waiting for....???
And please..."Tax Cut" is not a suitable solution...i.e. if it ever was.
Todd Killingsworth
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 30, 2002
Posts: 28
It's not whether we win or lose, its how we play the game after the war.
Businesses and investors hate uncertainty. There was little question that, once committed, the US would topple Iraq's government. The next questions are :
1) How much will Iraq's reconstruction cost, and how will that affect the U.S. economy?
2) How much damage has been done to international business due to alliance schisms, and the resulting economic repercussions?
3) Will there be disruptions due to retaliatory terrorist attacks on the US?
Until corporations feel comfortable again with capital investment and business expansion, and start loosening their purse strings, the unemployment numbers won't change much.
It's much larger than a single President and tax cuts.
Todd Killingsworth
Ashok Mash
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 13, 2000
Posts: 1936
There was an article in The Chicago Tribune dated 13th Aril that the tech jobs are going to double by 2010, and that there will be further shortage of technical expertise.
I don't know if its a good news or a bad news. 2010 is a long way to go.


[ flickr ]
Derek Grey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 204
Originally posted by Ashok Krishnan:
There was an article in The Chicago Tribune dated 13th Aril that the tech jobs are going to double by 2010, and that there will be further shortage of technical expertise.
I don't know if its a good news or a bad news. 2010 is a long way to go.

Ashok,
The question is, if the demand will increase in USA. Requirements for Programming will definetely grow, no question about that.
Ashok Mash
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 13, 2000
Posts: 1936
I tend to agree. However, Chicago Tribune's article was talking about American jobs I suppose. I am not too sure about that though.
Meanwhile, I think as someone who relocated to Europe for work, I should be willing to relocate back to India, China or any other place to stay in the industry. This flexibility was one of the major plus points with Indian knowledge workers, and I think their best bet is to be flexible for a foreseeable future.
Matt Cao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 03, 2003
Posts: 715
Hi,
I think if you will be in the twentyish by 2010 and with the experience of fourtyish may be.
On the hindsight, if you know Hindi or Mandarin, you should relocate back to your country of origins. Unless you think there is a possibility that you could land a job on the higher-end such as R&D post. I hope you are not interpreted this in a demeanor way. Those countries did and will come up with their own ideas, but it take time for the Westerner customers to accept their products. Japanese have being in that path before. You could check in those black and white movies and see how the westerner laughed at Japanese products previously.
My neighbor and some of my friends did because no one should be sink in the level of doing manual labor job just to get by in US, when you know there is alternative solution.
Cheers,
MCao
Derek Grey
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 204
Originally posted by Ashok Krishnan:
I tend to agree. However, Chicago Tribune's article was talking about American jobs I suppose. I am not too sure about that though.
Meanwhile, I think as someone who relocated to Europe for work, I should be willing to relocate back to India, China or any other place to stay in the industry. This flexibility was one of the major plus points with Indian knowledge workers, and I think their best bet is to be flexible for a foreseeable future.

Just a thought.... in a few years from now let's say 90% of the programming jobs are offshored which means programmers in those countries now know that they are the only ones who can do that job and eventually start demanding higher salaries (which might even contradict the whole basis on which offshoring started). I think that is a possibility. Programming requires good amount of brains (it infact streches one's thinking capacity)and when people are made to think, they don't stop thinking once they finish their job of writing code. They start to analyze that maybe they can get paid more etc. Now if that happens what would the US-based firm do???....take an educated guess.
John Fontana
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 28, 2002
Posts: 235
For the past 2 years, reports keep saying that an upturn is around the corner...
Posts in October said hiring will boom after Jan 1st...
posts in February said when a decision was made about the war...
posts in the past 3 weeks said after the war...
posts now say next year...


www.websiteandsound.com
"If you do what you've always done, you'll get what you've always gotten."
Vitor Belfort
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 27, 2002
Posts: 30

For the past 2 years, reports keep saying that an upturn is around the corner...
Posts in October said hiring will boom after Jan 1st...
posts in February said when a decision was made about the war...
posts in the past 3 weeks said after the war...
posts now say next year...

Yes that's another thing that's pretty annoying... No one likes recessions but when we're stuck in one why is everyone so blind about it.
Ashok Mash
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 13, 2000
Posts: 1936
Originally posted by Matt Cao:
Hi,
I think if you will be in the twentyish by 2010 and with the experience of fourtyish may be.
On the hindsight, if you know Hindi or Mandarin, you should relocate back to your country of origins.

I agree with Matt in general, but I don't think Hindi or Mandarin is going to help much. As long as the wealth distribution remains as it is now (I dont see a reason for change for next 40-50 years), rich and prospective clients will remain to be in the West ( or will operate innovatively from the West) and would communicate in English. So, ultimately, China or India would catch up with English rather than prefering to hire native language speakers to develop solutions for english speaking clients.
Cheers,
Ashok.
Carlisia Campos
sanitation engineer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 22, 2001
Posts: 135
The US gov't is proposing to (help) establish a government and estability in Iraq, while it cannot foster steady economic growth at home. Yes, the war, I know. But how about any talk of war was in the air... weren't we on the dumps back then?


i blog here: carlisia.com
JiaPei Jen
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 19, 2000
Posts: 1309
Is it possible that the U.S. economic recovery has been outsourced?
Elizabeth King
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 11, 2002
Posts: 191
very likely.
S. Palanigounder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 03, 2003
Posts: 145
I saw the job market, at least Java market,
is becoming worse after the war. Did you
feel that?
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
I think it's getting better. The number of opportunities and cold calls I've been receiving has increased in the last 6-8 weeks.
--Mark
JiaPei Jen
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 19, 2000
Posts: 1309
Unemployment rate is one of the lagging indicators of the economy. It means that, generally speaking, the timing of job creation lags behind economic recovery and the timing of job losses also lag behind when the economy starts it downward spree.
[ May 13, 2003: Message edited by: JiaPei Jen ]
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: War is over, but where are the jobs?