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What to do? Please help.

Peter Pol
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 24, 2002
Posts: 40
Hello everybody,
I need some advice...
I live in New York City metro area and I am a computer science graduate. I have been looking for a job about a year now, but with no luck...
So, I decided to go for a second degree. The problem is that I don't know what to choose. Should it be finance, statistics, economics or something else. I love programming, but I can't find anything in this field now.
Does anybody know which major I should add to my BS in computer science to have better chances to find a job? I'd like to use my programming skills in this new field (major I will choose).
Thank you very much for any information.
Peter
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Well, if you're looking for a non-CS degree, I recommend finance or economics. There are lots of hedge funds and other companies on Wall St that hire quants to do a combination of modeling and trading.
--Mark
SJ Adnams
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 28, 2001
Posts: 925
If it were me I would do this:
"MSc in Mathematic Trading and Finance" at Cass London.
CFA (www.aimr.org)
PRMIA (www.prima.org)
FRM (www.garp.org)
& do them all at the same time
Unfortunatly I'm not as smart as I like to think I am so would have trouble getting into Cass (and am struggling to revise level I CFA - exam is next week ).
John Lee
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 05, 2001
Posts: 2545
since you just graduate, so i think you may want to gain some experience. so i think you should study part-time, then try to find a part time job.
Peter Pol
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 24, 2002
Posts: 40
Originally posted by Don Liu:
since you just graduate, so i think you may want to gain some experience. so i think you should study part-time, then try to find a part time job.


You're right - I want to gain some experience. I have been looking for any job in programming (full-time, part-time, internship, volunteer), but I haven't got anything. I've been applying for jobs across the USA - but even this didn't help me to land a job.
I've had couple interviews, but the guys from HR didn't read my resume and invited me for a interview. During interview they asked me: "How many years of professional experience do you have?". In my resume it is stated that I have only academic experience...
They expect from you a lot, but meanwhile they don't even read your resume and you go to a interview for nothing. Well, almost for nothing - you can hear :"We're sorry, but we look for somebody who have X years of professional experience".
One more thing I'd like to ask... How do you determine that a job is an entry level job? I maen in terms of years of experience. I saw some jobs called "Entry level programmer" and when I went through these ads I found out that you need 3 - 6 years of experience. To get an entry level job do you really need to have a few years of experience?
What do you think?
Thank you for any comment and suggestions.
Peter
Balaji Loganathan
author and deputy
Bartender

Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Originally posted by Simon Lee:

CFA (www.aimr.org)
PRMIA (www.prima.org)
FRM (www.garp.org)
& do them all at the same time

Hi Simon,
Do you know any such certificates for trade/supply-chain management/economist realted field/area ??
Regards
Balaji


Spritle Software Blogs
SJ Adnams
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 28, 2001
Posts: 925
i worked for a supply chain company a few years back. Mostly SAP was the big thing then.
CFA is fairly broad, have you looked at the sylabus?
Balaji Loganathan
author and deputy
Bartender

Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Originally posted by Simon Lee:
i worked for a supply chain company a few years back. Mostly SAP was the big thing then.
CFA is fairly broad, have you looked at the sylabus?

Thanks for replying immed.
Yes I had look in the CFA sylabus, I feel like it is more into investment analysis, assessment,financial statement and accountancy oriented AND not something like supply-chain management, trade and economist, B2B commerce etc.,
Being worked for a supply-chain mgmt firm, may I know what made you to choose CFA level1 programme which is more or like CA(chartered accountant)?
SJ Adnams
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 28, 2001
Posts: 925
well I don't work in supply chain management now, I work in a bank
What kind of company are you looking to work for http://www.aspentech.com or http://www.i2.com that kind of thing?
Balaji Loganathan
author and deputy
Bartender

Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Originally posted by Simon Lee:
What kind of company are you looking to work for http://www.aspentech.com or http://www.i2.com that kind of thing?

Thanks again.
YES!..I would say something like www.i2.com or www.techsys.com, want to be a techinical advisor or trade analyst or something like that . Since my background is only computer science, I'm planning to do some certificates in trade realted area so that I can shape myself to suit the job requirements.
Balaji Loganathan
author and deputy
Bartender

Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Originally posted by Simon Lee:
I work in a bank

Well!.. now i feel CFA is a right certificate for you.
Matt Cao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 03, 2003
Posts: 715
Hi Peter,
I think you missed out intern opportunity while you were attending school there. Do you have any favorite professor related CS? Go bugging him or her for a connection or at least a real production project. Then apply for daytime job that helps you paid the bills. Then sign up for a second major or career, I think you qualify for a second major a lot quicker than you can land an entry programming job.
New York is known for major financial hub of the total thirteen financial hubs in US. If you follow the financial major, you probably will face with major competition for an entry level job again. Think of something else. Are you have a nick for learning foreign language? If yes, learn one or two Asian languages, then go apply for a job with UN. Once you inside, navigate your way so you could land a programming job with their IT dept. Sorry, got meeting to attend.
Regards,
MCao
Richard Scothern
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 25, 2001
Posts: 83
I beleive Bloomberg are hiring junior software engineers, however their systems are written in C and C++.
If you can convince them that your java skills are transferable (which they are), then you may have a chance.
Richard
Joe Richard
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 15, 2001
Posts: 76
Peter;
You may want to try and get an entry level job in the Computer Industry, like a Help Desk or Computer Operators job. This will give you a foot in the door and the chance to move up the ladder. You have a better chance of landing as a current employee. Many companies still promote from within. A help desk position will give you the change to learn the current application running in-house, if you talk to the right people you may be able to get a few easy projects assigned to you that involve programming. Even after two years if you do not get promoted you will still have the experience to get the job you want. Starting from the ground floor takes will take you a few years longer to get where you want to be, but it builds a very solid foundation. Employers like that.
Good Luck!
Never give up your dreams!


Persistence equals goals
SCJD (In Progress), SCJP
Tony Evans
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 29, 2002
Posts: 579
Hi Peter,
In your position I would look at a government job.
It offers stability, good training, not likely to be outsourced, a chance to gain good experience.
There is a whole raft of different government departments out there.
I have 7 years IT experience, but after a long hard look at the Industry and future trends I decided that I would be better of starting a new direction and the civil service was one such option that looked the most attractive.
Granted the pay is not as good, but if you have talent intelligence and drive they will give you a decent start and a decent career ladder.
Cheers Tony
 
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