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If java is saturated then what is unsaturated ???

 
samuel kumar
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What other technologies should be look into to beat the market and get a job thats challenging and also well paid.
What other areas coulds be a choice for me . please suggest.
I really appreciate it .
 
Thomas Paul
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Try nursing.
The problem is not Java but all IT jobs.
 
Anonymous
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We must do the best for the IT, to create, to revolution the technology, to work with IT we have to love it.
 
stara szkapa
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W(x) � number of workers with skill X
J(x) � number of jobs requiring skill X
It would be interesting to know J(x)/W(x) for all x.
Maybe there is some statistics on it on the net I don�t know about.
 
Tim Holloway
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This is a question that needs context. World-wide, the demand for software talent is good and expected to grow greatly, and to the best of my knowledge, that includes Java expertise, even if Microsoft wants everyone caught in their .Net.
So when considering a career doing Java, where you are located makes a big difference in the answer.
 
Mark Herschberg
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I think you're looking at it the wrong way.
I've never heard of a plain Java job. I've heard of jobs which require Java, but also use other skills. The ones requiring more difficult/complex/rarer skills seem less likely to be filled. I don't see the spectrum of Java jobs being saturated. I see Java jobs which require limited non-coding skills as being oversubscribed at the moment, but that's about it.
Unfortunately, most people find it easier to learn a new language than to improve the softer skills. For this reason, there is more competition and lower pay for those jobs. Granted, across the entire populas, engineering skills are harder to come by, and we are raised that the more "math" you can do, the smarter you are. But within the class of software developers, jumping to a new technology is relatively low cost; hence, we can all do it, and markets quickly saturate.
This is simple supply and demand. If you want a job that pays well and has little competition, you need to do something most other people can't. For engineers, that tends to be business and communication skills.
--Mark
 
Mark Herschberg
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Since, most people will not heed the advice in my previous post and instead will want a pure technical play, go into security.
Of course, it's not easy. You can't just read a book and say you know security. You'll need to prove it through classes, certifications, or prior work.
--Mark
 
Al Newman
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
I think you're looking at it the wrong way.
I've never heard of a plain Java job. I've heard of jobs which require Java, but also use other skills. The ones requiring more difficult/complex/rarer skills seem less likely to be filled. I don't see the spectrum of Java jobs being saturated. I see Java jobs which require limited non-coding skills as being oversubscribed at the moment, but that's about it.
Unfortunately, most people find it easier to learn a new language than to improve the softer skills. For this reason, there is more competition and lower pay for those jobs. Granted, across the entire populas, engineering skills are harder to come by, and we are raised that the more "math" you can do, the smarter you are. But within the class of software developers, jumping to a new technology is relatively low cost; hence, we can all do it, and markets quickly saturate.
This is simple supply and demand. If you want a job that pays well and has little competition, you need to do something most other people can't. For engineers, that tends to be business and communication skills.
--Mark

Mark, normally I would agree completely with your analysis, but until very recently what I've been seeing is an almost complete failure of demand for development skills - of any kind. Inclusive of you're "difficult/complex/rarer skills" which I also recognize and seek to a greater or lesser degree.
Moreover, I found that despite the existence of those rare skills I was failing to get through the job filters because of an inability to pass the buzzword challenge. I either didn't have the proper buzzwords on my CV or I couldn't pass their cheesy java exams. I had to go get the SCJP and SCWCD to pass those hurdles no matter how many valuable soft skills I had!
Now that I'm back working I've been doing nothing but analysis and requirements, because those indeed are rare skills among the ranks of java-hackers.
[ September 10, 2003: Message edited by: Alfred Neumann ]
 
shay Aluko
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Most people tend to look at Java as a be-all and end-all, there are so many things that are unsaturated in the IT field, a lot of Java developers are one-dimensional, we need to bear in mind that Java is just one aspect of a complex mosaic of technologies we need to master. For instance i left pure Java development to move into application server support, site availability, performance metrics etc. The Idea is we need to have Java as a part of our toolbox and move beyond Java and acquire skills that pertain to different stages of the software lifecycle. The IT field is shrinking regardless of where you are, the people that will thrive in this field will need to be more that mere java developers.
 
Al Newman
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Originally posted by shay Aluko:
Most people tend to look at Java as a be-all and end-all, there are so many things that are unsaturated in the IT field, a lot of Java developers are one-dimensional, we need to bear in mind that Java is just one aspect of a complex mosaic of technologies we need to master. For instance i left pure Java development to move into application server support, site availability, performance metrics etc. The Idea is we need to have Java as a part of our toolbox and move beyond Java and acquire skills that pertain to different stages of the software lifecycle. The IT field is shrinking regardless of where you are, the people that will thrive in this field will need to be more that mere java developers.

Well, maybe. I can see a place for a java specialist. Not only java but a family of related technologies. J2EE, Jini, JMS, RMI. What I tend to call 'all things J'. Plus App Servers, Ant, XDoclet, etc. This need not include things like specification and other so-called softer skills.
Right now the softer skills are hot compared to the coding skills because new projects are starting but haven't yet reached construction. But this is going to change at some point....
 
Tim Holloway
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
Since, most people will not heed the advice in my previous post and instead will want a pure technical play, go into security.
Of course, it's not easy. You can't just read a book and say you know security. You'll need to prove it through classes, certifications, or prior work.
--Mark

Just don't expect miracles. A good friend of mine who is quite talented, experienced, and certified in computer security recently got hired after a 2-year "unpaid vacation".
Ironically, the Fortune 500 company that canned him recently made national news thanks to their inability to handle "Worm Week".
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
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