aspose file tools*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes How to politely refuse a job offer Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Reply locked New topic
Author

How to politely refuse a job offer

Danesh Saeed
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 26, 2004
Posts: 6
Hi !
I am new to the industry so please don't mind my ignorance.
I am currently working for a company but was looking for a better job. Another company has offered me a job. But I don't think it is a stable company and I don't want to join it. So how do I refuse their job offer without creating any hard feelings. They are obviously going to ask me the reason why I am not joining. Its a small world and we might bump in to each other again, so I don't want to create any bitterness.
Danesh
Jeroen Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
Just tell them that you feel that at this time joining them would not be in the best interest for your career, in part because you want a more stable environment than they can provide you.
I did that twice, refused a very nice job offer for much the same reasons, and in both cases I turned out to have been correct.
In both cases the company was bankrupt inside of 6 months...
I've also quit a company for the same reason, and we're still good friends (there I was wrong, they're still around half a year later but who knows what would have happened if they'd had to keep paying for me for that period (they're now 4 people...)).


42
Tim Baker
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 04, 2003
Posts: 541
Well do you really think if they didn't offer you the job they would give you a proper reason?


Kim Jong II (North Korea's Dear Leader) said:Nuclear weapons don't kill people, people kill people.
Jeroen Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
Originally posted by Tim Baker:
Well do you really think if they didn't offer you the job they would give you a proper reason?

don't they always?
"We didn't think you'd fit in our team"
"You don't meet all our technical qualifications"
"We found someone else more experienced"
"........." (long silence)
"You'll hear from us"
If you want companies to treat you right, treat them right too. Be honest and give the real reason, not some excuse they know for a lie when they hear it.
Varun Khanna
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 30, 2002
Posts: 1400
Originally posted by Danesh Saeed:
Another company has offered me a job. But I don't think it is a stable company and I don't want to join it.

Why did you applied and gave interview at the first place? or was the offer without applying/interviews?
[ March 26, 2004: Message edited by: Varun Khanna ]

- Varun
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
I agree with Jeroen. It's the difference between saying to your girlfriend, "that's an ugly dress" and "I like you in darker colors," in other words, diplomacy.
Saying "you're not stable enough" can come off as curt. Saying, "given where I am, I'm looking for a less dynamic environment" (or something similar) is appropriate. Right now, I only like working for startups. I recognize that they're not for everyone, and if a 40yo with a wife, mortgage, and 2 kids said he didn't feel comfortable with it, I would understand and not be insulted.
I once had a guy accept a job, and then back out a few hours later because his wife said she didn't want him throwing himself into another startup, given that they just had a baby. He was honest (and felt bad about backing out), and I didn't hold it against him.
So be honest (always), but also consider the right words.
--Mark
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
I should also add that this is a great opportunity to network.
If you know anyone who even just might be right for the job, by all means make the connection! Your friend will appreciate the lead. The company will appreciate you trying to help them (and make the hiring manager's job easier). They will also at least read over the resume, because they think you're a good candidate, and figure people you know probably are as well. I do this all the time.
The one exception is if you got this job through a recruiter. Then, you might be hurting the recruiter's business, so you need to make sure everyone is on the same page about what is and isn't appropriate. (When in doubt, don't.)
--Mark
Tim Baker
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 04, 2003
Posts: 541
Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

Saying "you're not stable enough" can come off as curt. Saying, "given where I am, I'm looking for a less dynamic environment" (or something similar) is appropriate.
--Mark

Your current employer might not be to happy about being referred to as less dynamic
Jeroen Wenting
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
don't say "less stable", rather "less established".
Startups will understand that people like more job security than they can provide. The founders and everyone working for them is taking a huge financial risk, which is not for everyone.
The startup I worked for I told them I would reevaluate my position when the initial contract ran out and they accepted that.
When I left them at the end of that contract I did promise them they could always call me if they had trouble they couldn't sort out themselves and I'd come over for an evening or weekend to help them out.
They appreciated that, but it hasn't been required (except a few emails back and forth).
Billy Tsai
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 23, 2003
Posts: 1304
I need a better job after this Banking/ECommerce project


BEA 8.1 Certified Administrator, IBM Certified Solution Developer For XML 1.1 and Related Technologies, SCJP, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCDJWS, SCJD, SCEA,
Oracle Certified Master Java EE 5 Enterprise Architect
Charles Zimmerman
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 12, 2008
Posts: 4
I have a similar question... I recently was offered a position at another company and got to the point where I did all the paperwork and took the drug test. My current company (sales) made promises they didn't keep and made me think I'd be making all this extra money. Months have passed and this has turned out not to be true. I'd still like to get back in with the other company. Any one have any ideas on how I can 'save face' and what I should say to the guy who wanted to hire me at the other company I should've went with?
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61656
    
  67

Please don't post the same question in more than one topic, and please don;t re-awaken older posts.


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: How to politely refuse a job offer