*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes Job Of Project Manager Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "Job Of Project Manager" Watch "Job Of Project Manager" New topic
Author

Job Of Project Manager

Ashik Uzzaman
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 05, 2001
Posts: 2370

I have worked as a Java Faculty, then Java Programmer and now am working as a Senior Programmer in my current offshore company. I am considering the position of Project Manager as my next step either in my own company or somewhere else. I have pointed out the following issues to consider.

* I have BSS and MSS in Economics
* I have a 2 years' diploma in Software Engineering from NIIT
* I have passed SCJP, SCWCD, IBM XML and WebSphere Application Server exams.
* I have around 4 years' of IT (working) experience. My area of specialization is java, open source projects, design patterns and software develpoment discipline (CMM).

Now I think I lack an MBA to get my targetted post of project manager. For this, I can either go for a general MBA in an university or do MIS or go for MBA in Project Management.

Can you advise me what to choose from this? Can you add a few more options as well?

Also I would like to know if you do or don't appreciate my switching from core technical person to an IT manager position.

:roll:


Ashik Uzzaman
Senior Member of Technical Staff, Salesforce.com, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
I don't think I've met a single project manager with an MBA. I'm sure they exist, they're just not very common--at least not in the US.

An MBA lets you do one of two things:
- make a left turn in your career
- move into an executiove position

The former means you can switch careers. Consultants go into finance, software engineers move into marketing, etc. The latter means not just managerial, but executive position, typically a director or VP level, depending on the size of the company. A project manager is a line manager, first level up. For that job you need to understand basic project management skills and ideally the skills used by those under you. Certainly it helps to have an appreciattion of the larger issues in the business.

A business school curriculum, however, does not generally teach project management. Maybe some of the newer programs are targeted, but if you take a generic program at a place like Wharton, you won't find much on project management.

Given the cost of the program versus the added compensation, I would recommend taking targeted classes or a special PM program (maybe look at PMP certification--not that I'm necessarily a fan of this cert either). I don't think getting an MBA is the most efficent way to become a project manager.

--Mark
Ashik Uzzaman
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 05, 2001
Posts: 2370

Thank you very much Mark. I was infact thinking about whether the industry will accept me as a project manager without an MBA. Regarding learning, I can learn from books or going through some sort of PMP certification. But got some good hint from you. Thanks again.
Billy Tsai
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 23, 2003
Posts: 1297
maybe go study and get the Project Management Professional certification(PMP)
will help u become a PM


BEA 8.1 Certified Administrator, IBM Certified Solution Developer For XML 1.1 and Related Technologies, SCJP, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCDJWS, SCJD, SCEA,
Oracle Certified Master Java EE 5 Enterprise Architect
Dmitry Melnik
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2003
Posts: 328
I was infact thinking about whether the industry will accept me as a project manager without an MBA.

And I was thinking about whether the industry will accept me as a project manager with a PMP certificate and with very limited PM experience...
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Dmitry Melnik:

And I was thinking about whether the industry will accept me as a project manager with a PMP certificate and with very limited PM experience...


What did you think of the PMP certification? As I understand it, you need so many hours of experience and then you take a multiple choice test. I'm a big fan of experience (although how they supervise your experience is unclear to me). However, I don't think a multiple choice test comes anywhere close to testing your abilities to lead a project.

--Mark
Angela D'souza
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 16, 2002
Posts: 469
Ashik,
I am desperately looking for offshore companies for Java work. I read you working for offshore company. Would you mind giving me information about offshore company. That will be really great help to me.

Originally posted by Ashik uzzaman:
software develpoment discipline (CMM).

What is CMM?

Thanks,
Angela
Dmitry Melnik
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2003
Posts: 328
What did you think of the PMP certification?

I think that its another resume-jewel, that it proves that I have read the book, and it does not prove that I can manage a real life project, but might decrease my chance of totally screwing up my first one. Or not.

As I understand it, you need so many hours of experience and then you take a multiple choice test.

Well, I spent many hours studying, and then decided not to take the test. And may be I am wrong, still not sure.

However, I don't think a multiple choice test comes anywhere close to testing your abilities to lead a project.

...as well as reading a book (alone) comes anywhere close to learning a set of skills necessary to lead a project

While I can practice in programming, designing, and analysing by doing fun projects on my own, or doing things in my head, I really can not do the same with project management, because of lack of critical resources. And here I stuck

I don't think that asking people "Would you mind if I screw a project or two for you? I am just learning, y'know..." will work. Suggestions on how to get started are very welcome
[ August 05, 2004: Message edited by: Dmitry Melnik ]
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
OK, it's as I suspected. I'm liking the PMP cert even less than I like Java certs. :-p

The way I got started was being in the right place at the right time. Is your resume online? I might be able to take a look at it and suggest a course of action.


CMM stands for the Capability Maturity Model, and was created by Software Engineering Institute (SEI). It's a way of characterizing the software development process.

--Mark
[ August 05, 2004: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
Dmitry Melnik
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2003
Posts: 328
Is your resume online?

It sure is. I've sent the URL to you as a private message.

I might be able to take a look at it and suggest a course of action.

Thanks, I appreciate that.
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Dmitry,

Here's my feedback (with general lessons for everyone). Don't take my comments personally. I see a lot of resumes like this. I would encourage you to give the URL in this thread so others can see it and give you feedback, too--actually, we should start a new thread for this.

You need to look into rewriting your resume. A four page resume is way too long. It says to me that the person can't concisely communicate information, and often emhasizes the wrong information. Remember that most resumes are initially looked at between 15-45 seconds.

Shoot for two pages. Don't worry about listing every technology with every project. Maybe mentioned wrote wizbang using custom MFC extensions but who cares about the specifics. If they do, they'll ask you. This is especially true as your want to become a PM, the technology becomes less important.

Remove the objective. It's fine in college. After that, who cares? your object is to get the job you applied for. A summary is fine, but keep it brief--a few sentaces, not a half page list.

While I'm not a fan of TLA laundry lists, I understand why they are necessary (and some versions of my resume include them). But be more efficent in listing them. You have a short list and a long list--don't duplicate information.

Finally, consider whitespace. While a resume shouldn't be too busy, four pages of prose on past projects isn't a high-regarded format. Consider looking at resume samples in books and online.

WRT Pm (the subject of this thread), you need to focus on PM skills. First and foremost is communication by the resume itself (as noted above). Show a trend towards greater project responsibility. Remove general sentances in your resume and replace them with specific technical (and in more recent jobs, non-technical) accomplishments.

Good luck.

--Mark
Dmitry Melnik
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2003
Posts: 328
Mark, thanks a lot for your time and your response. I will not post my resume nor my real name here. At the moment I have valid reasons not to do so, even though I really need and appreciate ranchers' feedback.

You need to look into rewriting your resume. A four page resume is way too long.

Agreed. I normally cut off pieces irrelevant to the position I apply for, when I custom tailor my resume, and usually end up with 2 pages. And this one is a general purpose software analyst/engineer resume of mine. Need to prepare one for PM's job hunting.
[ August 10, 2004: Message edited by: Dmitry Melnik ]
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
 
subject: Job Of Project Manager