aspose file tools*
The moose likes JDBC and the fly likes SOAP, SAX and JDBC Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Spring in Action this week in the Spring forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Databases » JDBC
Bookmark "SOAP, SAX and JDBC " Watch "SOAP, SAX and JDBC " New topic
Author

SOAP, SAX and JDBC

Brian Snyder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 03, 2001
Posts: 142
I'm new to Java programming. I just completed a site for an invesment club that talks to a database using JDBC. How is and what is SOAP and SAX in relation to JDBC???
Where and what are the new trends in data storage?
Peter den Haan
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 20, 2000
Posts: 3252
Originally posted by Brian Snyder:
I'm new to Java programming. I just completed a site for an invesment club that talks to a database using JDBC. How is and what is SOAP and SAX in relation to JDBC???

No significant relation? Roughly, SAX is an event-driven XML parser framework and SOAP is an XML-based RPC (remote procedure call) technology.
Where and what are the new trends in data storage?

The latest trend is that oldfashioned relational databases are still refusing to die
Following your XML interest, what's moderately cool is that the ability to be able get your database query results back in XML format is becoming a common feature your typical run of the mill database. Add an XSLT processor and a stylesheet and, hey, presto, instant presentation, custom export formats, etc. But as long as the cost of parsing an XML file remains what it is, JDBC will remain the bread and butter of Java developers.
- Peter

[This message has been edited by Peter den Haan (edited June 13, 2001).]
Brian Snyder
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 03, 2001
Posts: 142
Thanks for the reply.
Andrew Shafer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 19, 2001
Posts: 338

Peter, what DBs will give you back XML?
Are they validated against some DTD/schema? Where can I find more information?


!_I_Know_Kung_Fu_!
Anil Vupputuri
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 31, 2000
Posts: 527
None other than Oracle8i , has a very good support of XML. Follow this link,
Oracle - XML for better understanding.
[This message has been edited by Anil Vupputuri (edited June 14, 2001).]


SCJP 1.5, SCEA, ICED (287,484,486)
vaibhav punekar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 20, 2001
Posts: 134
So Peter,
is it that if we get database query results in XML format,we save the trips to database.Ultimately when we parse the document and make any changes to it does it get reflected in database automatically?I don't think so.They need to go through a parser to the database.
Please correct if I am wrong.


VAIBHAV <BR>SCJP
Peter den Haan
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 20, 2000
Posts: 3252
Originally posted by vaibhav punekar:
So Peter,
is it that if we get database query results in XML format,we save the trips to database.

No; it's just a different representation of the same old data. But the XML representation might be easier to import somewhere else and, with XSLT, it's certainly easier to transform.
Ultimately when we parse the document and make any changes to it does it get reflected in database automatically?I don't think so.They need to go through a parser to the database.
Please correct if I am wrong.

You're spot on. And as far as I know databases are far less happy to accept XML as input.
Some of the cooler ideas that have been bounced around in the XML forum and elsewhere involve tightly coupling a database and an XML DOM representation of the database. So instead of using JDBC you could manipulate the DOM. Updating the database with an XML document simply means sticking that document somewhere in the database DOM, that's it. You could use XPath instead of SQL for querying, etc. Obviously, you would no longer work with textual representations at all; generating and parsing database-sized XML files would... erm... adversely affect performance.
- Peter
Ajith Kallambella
Sheriff

Joined: Mar 17, 2000
Posts: 5782
On a related note, we have been quite successful in maintaining the client data cache as a DOM tree. All the DB updates are then done by traversing the DOM tree and grouping the "nodes" that have changed.
This also helps us efficiently translate the table relations as represent real object relations.
Just thought of sharing this information ...
------------------
Ajith Kallambella M.
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java�2 Platform.
IBM Certified Developer - XML and Related Technologies, V1.


Open Group Certified Distinguished IT Architect. Open Group Certified Master IT Architect. Sun Certified Architect (SCEA).
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: SOAP, SAX and JDBC