my dog learned polymorphism*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes Same technology or multiple technologies Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of Android Security Essentials Live Lessons this week in the Android forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "Same technology or multiple technologies" Watch "Same technology or multiple technologies" New topic
Author

Same technology or multiple technologies

sangeeta kapoor
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 15, 2004
Posts: 70
I am working in Java for the past 2.5 years. Mine is small company where there are different teams for different technologies. dot net team handles dot net projects, Java team handles Java projects and so on.
I have some friends in some big multinational companies like Accenture, Sapient, HCL etc. They tell me that they are never into any one particular technology. Sometimes they get work in C++, sometimes in Java, dot net or even testing. They say this makes growth faster.

I am really confused whats the best way to go for in one's career. Stick to one technology like J2EE and keep moving in different technologies.

Whenever I see an adv. in a newspaper it always says x number of years in a particualr technology. If one keeps on changing technologies like this, then experience in one particular technology will not be much.
Arjunkumar Shastry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 28, 2005
Posts: 986
Companies ask specific business domain knowldge besides array of languages.I think overall awareness of Software technologies is essential than knowing just coding in one language.Business knowledge process is also must now a days.


Namma Suvarna Karnataka
krishnaraj sg
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 29, 2005
Posts: 17
hi,

my advice to you is,dont think about such nonsense,itz highly imposible for a person to learn all the technology and do a project development,just consider java itself,itz soo vast,it will take years to master just one...same is with .NET,C,C++,Testing.

Be in one field,master that technology and live happy.

krishnaraj.sg
sangeeta kapoor
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 15, 2004
Posts: 70
Originally posted by krishnaraj sg:
hi,

my advice to you is,dont think about such nonsense,itz highly imposible for a person to learn all the technology and do a project development,just consider java itself,itz soo vast,it will take years to master just one...same is with .NET,C,C++,Testing.

Be in one field,master that technology and live happy.

krishnaraj.sg


I totally agree with you, it's impossible to master many technologies. But what if your company asks you to. I have seen people doing it in some big companies. Also why do companies do this, shifting people from one technology to another.
Victor Banerjee
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 30, 2005
Posts: 88
I think it actually depends on what kind of a company you are working for.

Delivery -
In this line, you are expected to deliver moderately complex or simple code of high quality.
Here knowing multiple languages is the silver bullet. In short -
"Jack of All Trades. Masters of None". This covers 80-85% of all projects/companies you would come across.

Product Development, Mission Critical applications-
Here in depth knowledge of one language is required. You are expected to deliver complex code of high quality.
Very few companies work on this in India. Most Indian companies are purely delivery focussed and you would find less of them in this sector.

Now you make a choice and move in one direction.
Roger Chung-Wee
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 29, 2002
Posts: 1683
Also why do companies do this, shifting people from one technology to another.

They do this because they are short of expertise and have a client demanding that work be delivered to a tight schedule. On a previous project, our Indian outsourcer (IBM in Bangalore as it happens, but it could have been any other big outsourcer) assigned at least one non-Java programmer to work on our Swing client.

My firm belief is that you are better off if you are able to work just on the technology which interests you, assuming that it is technology which is in good demand. You will develop expertise which will, sooner or later, be rewarding.


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.3, SCBCD 1.3
peter wooster
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 13, 2004
Posts: 1033
Originally posted by sangeeta kapoor:
I am working in Java for the past 2.5 years. Mine is small company where there are different teams for different technologies. dot net team handles dot net projects, Java team handles Java projects and so on.
I have some friends in some big multinational companies like Accenture, Sapient, HCL etc. They tell me that they are never into any one particular technology. Sometimes they get work in C++, sometimes in Java, dot net or even testing. They say this makes growth faster.

I am really confused whats the best way to go for in one's career. Stick to one technology like J2EE and keep moving in different technologies.

Whenever I see an adv. in a newspaper it always says x number of years in a particualr technology. If one keeps on changing technologies like this, then experience in one particular technology will not be much.


Learn as many languages and systems as you can, you don't have to an expert in each of them. You should attempt to reach guru status in at least one, but there is a very good chance that it will become "legacy". If you know several, you show prospective employers that you are adaptable and capable of learning whatever they need.

The job ads want the moon. How may people have 5 years experience in J2EE, or 10 in Java? How long does it take to learn Struts, JSP and Servlets? Is there a reason that a WebSphere expert is useless on WebLogic or JBoss? How big is the learning curve going from Java to C#? What will you do when Java is replaced as the next cool language? Would you hire an architect who only knew one platform?
amit taneja
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 14, 2003
Posts: 810
many answer with differernt replies ?

oops...

what about doing java architect exam ? who should do it ?
if my aim is to do java architect exam within 1-2 years (as i have 1 yr experience ) what do you say ?

now java is demanding and java has strong future and its still growing..(point to be noted specially for java)

this boom of this language has never been seen by anylanguage in past
(c/c++ has their time but not as boom as java now days )

and many expert from you has firm belive that java will remain...

my personal conclusion

become aim for java architect ..and side by side learn things as you can or has to


regards,
amit


Thanks and Regards, Amit Taneja
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 15960
    
  19

Originally posted by amit taneja:

this boom of this language has never been seen by anylanguage in past


Ever heard of something called COBOL?


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
peter wooster
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 13, 2004
Posts: 1033
Originally posted by amit taneja:

now java is demanding and java has strong future and its still growing..(point to be noted specially for java)

this boom of this language has never been seen by anylanguage in past
(c/c++ has their time but not as boom as java now days )

and many expert from you has firm belive that java will remain...


I recommend that you read The Hundred Year Language by Paul Graham.
[ July 07, 2005: Message edited by: peter wooster ]
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: Same technology or multiple technologies
 
Similar Threads
HCL or Sapient
Sapient or Accenture
.Net Devlopers - Windows & Web Application at SRA Systems Limited, in Chennai
Java in i-series
Any Comments on my Resume?