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How should I pursue Java professionally?

Kizito Ssensalo
Greenhorn

Joined: May 31, 2005
Posts: 1
Hello Everyone!

I'm a self taught web developer who works in classic ASP. I have had difficulty in the past year finding a job and I started to think that I should learn another programming language.

I took a Java class and I really, really liked it. I start thinking that perhaps I could write in Java for a profession. I think that I want to take the Java self paced courses (on the sun.com site) and then get the Java Certification.

So here are my questions:

1. Which courses should I take? How many courses should I take before I take the certification?

2. When I finally get my certification, how much does a java programmer make on average?

3. is there any other path you recommend for someone who wants to pursue a career as a java programmer?
David Ulicny
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 04, 2004
Posts: 724
3. is there any other path you recommend for someone who wants to pursue a career as a java programmer?


Work with Java 12 hours per day.
Also think about some good book, for example Head First series is very good.
Have you any experience with C/C++? If yes, than you will find Java not hard to learn.


SCJP<br />SCWCD <br />ICSD(286)<br />MCP 70-216
Steve Simon Joseph Fernandez
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 17, 2005
Posts: 35
Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel is a good book to start with. But, as is the case with everything else, nothing can take the place of regular practice

_steve.
Andrew Morris
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 27, 2005
Posts: 8
As Steve was mentioning you need regular practice and here are some resources that can help
Books:
* Herbert Schildt Java 2 A Beginner's Guide
* Cay Horstmann, " Computing Concepts with JAVA 2 Essentials"
* The Complete Reference Java 2 By Herbert Schildt
* C. Thomas Wu An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming with JAVA
Tutorials:
http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/java/newto/
http://leepoint.net/notes-java/
http://www.javacoffeebreak.com/tutorials/
you can also practice coding online at http://www.devsquare.com
Ilja Preuss
author
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 11, 2001
Posts: 14112
Originally posted by David Ulicny:

Work with Java 12 hours per day.


Make that something more around 7 hours or whatever you are comfortable with. Software Development is a marathon, not a sprint. Learning a new language you will need all your concentration, getting burned out would just be waste.


The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny - it is the light that guides your way. - Heraclitus
madhup narain
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 14, 2004
Posts: 148
As a programmer i have to say that i get to learn something new every day. So there no end to learning the language. I have been into coding for quite some time there is nothing that can be counted in hours, what i mean is yoy may learn something that takes someone 8 hrs in just 4 hours, provided that you dont get bored.
Its really difficult to put in a specified number of hours, i would say that try learning the basics of the language for a start ... then start coding once you get hold of the concepts...improve them ... remember you get to learnm new things every day then finally you can think about the certification.


Money for nothing and Java for Free
SCJP, SCWCD
Santana Iyer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 13, 2005
Posts: 335
Hi all,

I really liked madhup's resonse.

I am fresher, no exp. into Java from past 10 months.

Take it easy, study little but make sure you understand.
I gave SCJA1.0 Beta in which I learned about j2ee, j2me although very basic
but I feel Java as technology is too big.

I have read many books on Java, my personal favorite is Head First Java by Kathy Sierra, Bert Bates. You can goto amazon.com and check it is Bestselling book on Java (when I bought it few months back it was).

Madhup says is 100% right, every day you learn new things.
In my view Java is place where it may take time to get used to. So take it easy, take own time.

This is in my view, I am still student.
Bye.
D'Angelis Grant
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 24, 2005
Posts: 9
Questions,

You have ASP, have you looked at ASP.NET?

Do you a degree or other qualification?

Experience seems to be key to getting a job. What does everyone think of this person's chances of getting hired as a java developer?

I don't know which is better over the long term but my gut feeling is that it would be easier to get hired as an ASP.NET developer than a java one given your background.

I have passed SCJP 1.4. It felt like an insult to my intelligence. Anyone with a copy of K&Bs book could pass this whether they could program in java or not.
Sonny Gill
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 02, 2002
Posts: 1211

Originally posted by Steve Simon Joseph Fernandez:
Thinking in Java by Bruce Eckel is a good book to start with. But, as is the case with everything else, nothing can take the place of regular practice

_steve.


I would disagree. It may not be a good book to start with, in many cases. Especially when you want to quickly come up to speed on Java.

TIJ tries to go a lot into OO thinking, which may be too difficult to follow if at the same time you are trying to learn the basics of the language. IMHO it would make a good 2nd book on Java though
m brown
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 01, 2005
Posts: 57
Originally posted by David Ulicny:


Work with Java 12 hours per day.


wow...are you serious?
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
 
subject: How should I pursue Java professionally?