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without being very familiar with any IDE, is that a big problem ?

Artemesia Lakener
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Joined: Jun 21, 2005
Posts: 162
Believe or not, I really don't use IDE much. I am a unix guy. I don't like any IDE much. But I do have a few years java experience in J2EE, Swing, etc. I am wondering --- Do people care lot if you are familiar with any IDE ? will that become a problem for me when I go to interview ?
Thomas Paul Bigbee
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Joined: Jun 28, 2005
Posts: 71
Yep
When you go for an interview, and you're asked which IDE you like best, and you state: "I don't use any IDE, I'm a Unix guy", I'm going to bet you ten against fifty that you wont get the job (I would not hire you), the reason is this, all professional IDEs allow collaboration between developers (check out, check in, restore, etc...), collaboration is the name of the game, my strong suggestion is that you get an open-source IDE like Eclipse and a build tool like ant and start building some projects from scratch.

Hope I was not too harsh, however, you asked...
Tom
Luke Kolin
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Joined: Sep 04, 2002
Posts: 336
While any IDE worth its salt has hooks into source management systems like CVS, Subversion and VSS they are by no means the only way. Subversion has a very nice command line interface, and most people in my workplace use WinCVS instead of the native CVS support in Eclipse because of issues. The Eclipse/SVN plug in has similar annoyances.

Rejecting a person because you don't know of command-line interfaces to source management systems says more about your talents than his.

Cheers!

Luke
Artemesia Lakener
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Joined: Jun 21, 2005
Posts: 162
Originally posted by Thomas Paul Bigbee:
Yep
When you go for an interview, and you're asked which IDE you like best, and you state: "I don't use any IDE, I'm a Unix guy", I'm going to bet you ten against fifty that you wont get the job (I would not hire you), the reason is this, all professional IDEs allow collaboration between developers (check out, check in, restore, etc...), collaboration is the name of the game, my strong suggestion is that you get an open-source IDE like Eclipse and a build tool like ant and start building some projects from scratch.

Hope I was not too harsh, however, you asked...
Tom


thanks for the opinion. One more thing I want to mention --- I do use ant, the difference is I write customize build.xml by myself, and I do use source control tools that are NOT integrated with IDE. But, if people ask me "have you used lot of the debug features of IDE ?" I will look silly on that. That's what I miss..

anyway, I welcome all kinds of opinions, that's why I posted the msg
Kj Reddy
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Joined: Sep 20, 2003
Posts: 1704
I dont think it will be a problem. Initially I never worked on any IDE and I didnt faced any problem getting shortlisted in interviews. But same time to know the mininum basics about an IDE wont take much time. IDE makes you easier to work and you can complete the code in less time so the productivity increases.
Eric Lemaitre
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Joined: Jul 03, 2004
Posts: 538

Hi Artemesia !

Believe or not, I really don't use IDE much. I am a unix guy. I don't like any IDE much. But I do have a few years java experience in J2EE, Swing, etc. I am wondering --- Do people care lot if you are familiar with any IDE ? will that become a problem for me when I go to interview ?

I would say not too much, but you should learn how to use Eclipse quickly. It is now by far the most widely used, is friendly and well done, in any interview if you state you use Eclipse it will be fine anyway. What is more you don't need to be an expert at all so light experience would be enough and very quick to get.

Best regards.


Eric LEMAITRE
CNAM IT Engineer, MS/CS (RHCE, RHCX, SCJA, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, Net+)
Free Online Tutorials: http://www.free-tutorials-online.net/
Tim Holloway
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Jun 25, 2001
Posts: 15959
    
  19

I haven't noticed any significant difference in collaboration ability between projects based on Windows Notepad vs. some gee-whize IDE. Mind you, I haven't been using RUP, but then RUP isn't used where I work anyway.

The thing I like best about an IDE is intelligent completion. Given a language environment such as Java that has literally thousands of classes, methods and assorted other adjuncts, having the editor pop up most likely completions saves a lot of time.

IDE debugging is invaluable to me as well, but I work with people who use their IDE's editor to insert lots of System.out.println's and most of them can bang out code faster than I can.

The major problem with lack of IDE experience is you end up bouncing off cluess HR types who demand 6+ years of WSAD experience, which, if you prefer to remain honest is a problem (to say the least).

There is one other reason for demanding IDE experience. I do know some people who never bother to build Ant scripts. Thus, the only way they can do a build is from the IDE (and specifically that exact make and version IDE). Fortunately for them, I'm not in a position to mete out what I consider an appropriate punishment for that sort of behavior.


Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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